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pantoprazole

Pronunciation

Generic Name: pantoprazole (pan TOE pra zole)
Brand Name: Protonix, Protonix IV

What is pantoprazole?

Pantoprazole is a proton pump inhibitor that decreases the amount of acid produced in the stomach.

Pantoprazole is used to treat erosive esophagitis (damage to the esophagus from stomach acid), and other conditions involving excess stomach acid such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome.

Pantoprazole is not for immediate relief of heartburn symptoms.

Pantoprazole may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about pantoprazole?

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking pantoprazole?

Heartburn is often confused with the first symptoms of a heart attack. Seek emergency medical attention if you have chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, and a general ill feeling.

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to pantoprazole or to similar medicines such as lansoprazole (Prevacid), esomeprazole (Nexium), omeprazole (Prilosec, Zegerid), or rabeprazole (AcipHex).

To make sure pantoprazole is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • severe liver disease;

  • low levels of magnesium in your blood;

  • osteoporosis; or

  • low bone mineral density (osteopenia).

Taking a proton pump inhibitor such as pantoprazole may increase your risk of bone fracture in the hip, wrist, or spine. This effect has occurred mostly in people who have taken the medicine long term or at high doses, and in those who are age 50 and older. It is not clear whether pantoprazole is the actual cause of an increased risk of fracture.

This medicine is not expected to harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

Pantoprazole can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while using this medicine.

Pantoprazole is not approved for use by anyone younger than 5 years old.

How should I take pantoprazole?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Pantoprazole tablets can be taken with or without food. Pantoprazole oral granules should be taken 30 minutes before a meal.

Do not crush, chew, or break the tablet. Swallow it whole.

The oral granules should be mixed with applesauce or apple juice. Do not use any other type of liquid or soft food. Sprinkle the granules directly onto 1 teaspoon of applesauce or apple juice. Stir for 5 seconds and swallow this mixture right away without chewing. Do not save the mixture for later use.

To give pantoprazole granules through a nasogastric (NG) feeding tube:

  • Attach a 60-milliliter syringe to the NG tube and remove the plunger. Hold the syringe high enough to prevent any bends in the tube.

  • Empty the pantoprazole granules into the syringe barrel and mix in 2 teaspoons of apple juice.

  • Add 2 more teaspoons of apple juice to the syringe to rinse the granules through. Tap or shake the syringe as the juice empties into the tube.

  • Rinse with 2 teaspoons of apple juice at least twice more to make sure there are no granules remaining in the syringe or NG tube.

Take this medicine for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the condition is fully treated.

If you use pantoprazole for longer than 3 years, you could develop a vitamin B-12 deficiency. Talk to your doctor about how to manage this condition if you develop it.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse while you are taking this medicine.

If you use pantoprazole for longer than 3 years, you could develop a vitamin B-12 deficiency. Talk to your doctor about how to manage this condition if you develop it.

This medicine can cause you to have a false positive drug screening test. If you provide a urine sample for drug screening, tell the laboratory staff that you are taking pantoprazole.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking pantoprazole?

This medicine can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, call your doctor. Do not use anti-diarrhea medicine unless your doctor tells you to.

Pantoprazole side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • severe stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss;

  • diarrhea that is watery or bloody;

  • seizure (convulsions);

  • kidney problems--urinating more or less than usual, blood in your urine, swelling, rapid weight gain; or

  • symptoms of low magnesium--dizziness, confusion; fast or uneven heart rate; tremors (shaking) or jerking muscle movements; feeling jittery;muscle cramps, muscle spasms in your hands and feet; cough or choking feeling.

Common side effects may include:

  • headache;

  • fever;

  • cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat;

  • stomach pain, gas, nausea, vomiting;

  • mild diarrhea; or

  • joint pain.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

Pantoprazole dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Erosive Esophagitis:

Treatment:
-Recommended dose: 40 mg orally once a day
-Duration of therapy: 8 weeks

Maintenance:
-Recommended dose: 40 mg once daily

Comments:
-If patients are not healed after 8 weeks or erosive esophagitis recurs with the oral formulation, treatment for another 8 weeks may be considered.
-Controlled studies using the oral formulation for maintenance did not extend beyond 12 months.

Uses:
-Short-term treatment in the healing and symptomatic relief of erosive esophagitis
-Maintenance of healing of erosive esophagitis

Usual Adult Dose for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease:

Oral:
-Recommended dose: 40 mg orally once a day
-Duration of therapy: 8 weeks

Parenteral:
-Recommended dose: 40 mg IV once a day, given over at least 2 minutes OR over 15 minutes
-Duration of therapy: 7 to 10 days

Comments:
-IV treatment should be discontinued once the patient is able to take an oral formulation.
-Use of the IV formulation has not been studied for longer than 10 days.
-If patients are not healed after 8 weeks with the oral formulation, treatment for another 8 weeks may be considered.

Uses:
-Short-term treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients with a history of erosive esophagitis
-Reduction of relapse rates of daytime and nighttime heartburn symptoms in adult patients with GERD

Usual Adult Dose for Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome:

Oral:
-Recommended dose: 40 mg orally 2 times a day
-Maximum dose: 240 mg/day

Parenteral:
-Initial dose: 80 mg IV every 12 hours, given over at least 2 minutes OR over 15 minutes
-Maintenance dose: 80 mg IV every 8 to 12 hours, given over at least 2 minutes OR over 15 minutes
-Maximum dose: 240 mg/day
-Maximum duration of therapy: 6 days

Comments:
-IV treatment should be discontinued once the patient is able to take an oral formulation.
-Use of the IV formulation for longer than 6 days and/or with doses higher than 240 mg has not been adequately studied.
-Patients may be vulnerable to increased acid production despite a short period of loss of effective inhibition.
-Patients given the oral formulation should be continued on therapy for as long as clinically necessary.

Use:
-Treatment of pathological hypersecretory conditions, including Zollinger-Ellison syndrome

Usual Pediatric Dose for Erosive Esophagitis:

5 years and older:
15 to less than 40 kg: 20 mg orally once a day
40 kg and greater: 40 mg orally once a day
Duration of therapy: Up to 8 weeks

Comment:
-Safety has not been established in treatment beyond 8 weeks.

Uses:
-Short-term treatment in the healing and symptomatic relief of erosive esophagitis
-Short-term treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients with a history of erosive esophagitis

Usual Pediatric Dose for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease:

5 years and older:
15 to less than 40 kg: 20 mg orally once a day
40 kg and greater: 40 mg orally once a day
Duration of therapy: Up to 8 weeks

Comment:
-Safety has not been established in treatment beyond 8 weeks.

Uses:
-Short-term treatment in the healing and symptomatic relief of erosive esophagitis
-Short-term treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients with a history of erosive esophagitis

What other drugs will affect pantoprazole?

Tell your doctor about all medicines you use, and those you start or stop using during your treatment with pantoprazole, especially:

  • ampicillin;

  • ketoconazole;

  • methotrexate;

  • mycophenolate mofetil;

  • warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven);

  • HIV or AIDS medicine--atazanavir, nelfinavir; or

  • iron-containing medicines--ferrous fumarate, ferrous gluconate, ferrous sulfate, and others.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with pantoprazole, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist can provide more information about pantoprazole.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 16.01. Revision Date: 2015-01-20, 11:04:42 AM.

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