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Methotrexate Patient Tips

Medically reviewed on Oct 16, 2017 by C. Fookes, BPharm.

How it works

  • Methotrexate interferes with DNA synthesis and has more of an effect against cells that are proliferating faster than normal (these types of cells typically occur in cancer and psoriasis). It has been shown to inhibit dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), an enzyme that participates in the folic acid synthesis. Folic acid is essential in the synthesis of purines and pyrimidines, vital for protein, DNA, and RNA synthesis
  • Experts are not sure how methotrexate works in rheumatoid arthritis but believe it may have multiple mechanisms including an effect on immune function.
  • Methotrexate belongs to the class of medicines called antimetabolites. It may also be called a folic acid antagonist. Methotrexate is also called an immunosuppressant.

Upsides

  • May be used for the treatment of severe, disabling psoriasis or rheumatoid arthritis that is not responsive to other forms of treatment.
  • May be used in the treatment of some life-threatening cancers including osteosarcoma, hydatidiform mole, and acute lymphocytic leukemia.

Downsides

If you are between the ages of 18 and 60, take no other medication or have no other medical conditions, side effects you are more likely to experience include:

  • Mouth lesions, low blood counts, poor appetite, nausea and abdominal discomfort are the most common side effects of methotrexate. Tiredness, dizziness, skin rash, hair loss, and an increased susceptibility to infection have also been reported.
  • May cause bone marrow, liver, lung and kidney disease; deaths have been reported from methotrexate use. Periodic liver biopsies are recommended for people taking methotrexate long-term.
  • May cause a potentially fatal and irreversible lung condition; incidence does not depend on the dosage of methotrexate or length of treatment.
  • May not be suitable for people with anemia, poor kidney function, immunodeficiency, bone marrow disorders, gastrointestinal conditions, liver disease, fluid in the lungs, or with alcoholism. Methotrexate is more likely to cause toxicity in these people. Should not be used with NSAIDs as it may cause bone marrow suppression, anemia, and damage the stomach and intestinal lining. Methotrexate may also not be suitable for people with folate deficiency, stomach ulcers, lung disease, who are receiving radiation treatment or with any type of infection.
  • Not recommended for women of childbearing age unless benefits clearly outweigh risks as can cause fetal death or birth defects. May affect a person's future ability to have children, whether they are a man or a woman. Women should not breastfeed while taking methotrexate.
  • May occasionally cause severe, potentially fatal skin reactions. These may occur following single or multiple doses of methotrexate.
  • Interacts with many drugs, particularly those that also bind to blood proteins such as aspirin, sulfonamides, tetracyclines, and phenytoin.

Notes: In general, seniors or children, people with certain medical conditions (such as liver or kidney problems, heart disease, diabetes, seizures) or people who take other medications are more at risk of developing a wider range of side effects. For a complete list of all side effects, click here.

Bottom Line

Methotrexate may be considered for the treatment of psoriasis or rheumatoid arthritis if other treatments have failed. It may also be used in certain cancers. Side effects can be severe and potentially fatal so a full assessment of the risks versus benefits is required before methotrexate is prescribed. Ongoing monitoring of blood counts, liver and kidney function is also required.

Tips

  • There are significant risks associated with the use of methotrexate and your physician should fully inform you of the risks before starting treatment. During treatment, you should be monitored regularly.
  • Carefully read dosage instructions. For psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis, methotrexate is usually prescribed WEEKLY, not daily. If your label instructs you to take it daily, double check with your doctor that these are the correct instructions.
  • Report any instance of a dry, nonproductive cough to your doctor for further investigation.
  • Also report any instances of fever, unusual bleeding or bruising, loss of appetite, clay-colored stools, yellowing of the skin or eyes, swelling, diarrhea, skin reactions, vomiting, or mouth ulcers to your doctor.
  • Keep up a good level of hydration while taking methotrexate. If you become dehydrated, methotrexate may need to be temporarily discontinued until you have recovered.
  • Continued treatment with methotrexate may depend on the results of blood, kidney function, and other tests.
  • Keep up fluid levels while taking methotrexate; do not allow yourself to become dehydrated.
  • May make your skin more sensitive to the sun. Cover up and wear sunblock on exposed areas of skin when outside.
  • Do not take any over-the-counter NSAIDs including aspirin while you are on methotrexate unless your doctor permits this. Also, ask your doctor before taking any vitamin supplements or other medications purchased over-the-counter, or before receiving immunizations.
  • You may be at an increased risk of infection while taking methotrexate so avoid crowded areas and people who are unwell if you can. Wash your hands often.
  • Take good care of your mouth to help prevent mouth sores. Use a soft toothbrush and a mouthwash.
  • Avoid drinking alcohol or keep alcohol intake to a minimum while taking methotrexate.
  • If you are a woman with child-bearing potential, you should always use a reliable form of contraception while you are taking methotrexate. Your doctor may request that you take a pregnancy test before starting methotrexate. Methotrexate may also cause changes in your menstrual cycle. Men taking methotrexate should continue to use condoms for at least three months after stopping methotrexate.
  • Tell other healthcare providers that you are taking methotrexate. You should not receive any live vaccines while taking methotrexate.
  • If you are caring for somebody who is taking methotrexate, wear gloves when cleaning up body fluids or handling contaminated laundry or diapers, because methotrexate can transfer into urine, feces, and vomit. Wash any soiled items separately.

Response and Effectiveness

  • Peak levels are reached within one to two hours following an oral dose. Absorption of methotrexate depends on dosage; at a higher dosage, less methotrexate is absorbed. Toxicity of methotrexate appears to depend on how fast the drug is eliminated from the body. People with poor kidney function and certain other conditions are more likely to eliminate the drug slowly. The coadministration of leucovorin may help reduce toxicity.
  • Reduction in symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis such as joint swelling and tenderness may occur within 3 to 6 weeks. Also, reduces inflammation and pain; however, does not cause remission of rheumatoid arthritis nor prevent long-term joint damage. Most studies have been short-term, but limited studies suggest beneficial effects on symptoms persist for up to two years with continued treatment.
  • Methotrexate usually shows some benefit in psoriasis within six to eight weeks; however, full effects may not be seen for five to six months. In chronic plaque psoriasis, 50-70% report a good result.
  • When given to treat cancer, the length of time for an effect depends on the type of cancer and patient response to methotrexate.

References

  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use methotrexate only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that this information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. This drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. It is an informational resource designed as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Drugs.com does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of this information. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2017 Drugs.com. Revision Date: 2017-10-15 21:29:42

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