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Mixed grass pollens allergen extract Side Effects

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Nov 7, 2020.

For the Consumer

Applies to mixed grass pollens allergen extract: sublingual tablet

Warning

Sublingual route (Tablet)

Use of Sweet Vernal/Orchard/Rye/Timothy/Kentucky Blue Grass mixed pollen allergen extract may lead to life-threatening allergic reactions including anaphylaxis and severe laryngopharyngeal edema. Do not use in patients with severe asthma that is unstable or uncontrolled. Monitor patients for at least 30 minutes after administration of the initial dose. Prescribe auto-injectable epinephrine and instruct on its use, including when to seek immediate medical care. Sweet Vernal/Orchard/Rye/Timothy/Kentucky Blue Grass mixed pollen allergen extract may not be appropriate for patients whose medical conditions decrease their ability to survive a serious allergic reaction or for patients who are unresponsive to epinephrine or inhaled bronchodilators, eg, when receiving beta-blocker therapy.

Side effects requiring immediate medical attention

Along with its needed effects, mixed grass pollens allergen extract may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking mixed grass pollens allergen extract:

More common

  • Congestion
  • cough
  • difficulty with breathing
  • fever
  • itching ears, mouth, and tongue
  • noisy breathing
  • sore throat
  • swelling of the mouth
  • swollen, painful, or tender lymph glands in the neck, armpit, or groin
  • tightness in the chest

Less common

  • Body aches or pain
  • chills
  • headache
  • hives or welts, itching, or skin rash
  • loss of voice
  • numbness or tingling feeling around the mouth
  • redness of the skin
  • runny nose or sneezing
  • swelling of the lips or tongue
  • unusual tiredness or weakness

Incidence not known

  • Blurred vision
  • chest pain or discomfort
  • cold hands and feet
  • confusion
  • diarrhea
  • difficulty swallowing
  • dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up suddenly from a lying or sitting position
  • fainting
  • fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse
  • general feeling of discomfort or illness
  • heartburn
  • joint pain
  • large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or genitals
  • lightheadedness
  • loss of appetite
  • loss of consciousness
  • mouth or throat blisters
  • muscle aches and pains
  • nausea
  • neck tenderness or swelling
  • pain or burning in the throat
  • pale skin
  • puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue
  • redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest
  • shivering
  • sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or tongue or inside the mouth
  • sweating
  • trouble sleeping
  • vomiting
  • weight decreased

Side effects not requiring immediate medical attention

Some side effects of mixed grass pollens allergen extract may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects.

Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Less common

  • Belching
  • burning feeling in the chest or stomach
  • stomach discomfort, upset, or pain

Incidence not known

  • Anxiety
  • continuing ringing or buzzing or other unexplained noise in the ears
  • dry eyes
  • dry mouth
  • hearing loss
  • increased watering of the mouth
  • lack or loss of strength
  • sleepiness or unusual drowsiness

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to mixed grass pollens allergen extract: sublingual tablet

General

The most common side effects reported were oral pruritus, throat irritation, ear pruritus, mouth edema, tongue pruritus, cough, oropharyngeal pain.[Ref]

Hypersensitivity

Postmarketing reports: Anaphylactic reaction, oral allergy syndrome, angioedema[Ref]

Respiratory

Very common (10% or more): Throat irritation (22%)

Common (1% to 10%): Cough, oropharyngeal pain, pharyngeal edema, tonsillitis, upper respiratory tract infection, asthma, dysphonia

Postmarketing reports: Dyspnea, laryngeal edema, stridor, wheezing, exacerbation of asthma, oropharyngeal blistering[Ref]

Cardiovascular

Postmarketing reports: Flushing, eosinophilic myocarditis, palpitations, tachycardia, hypotension, circulatory collapse, pallor, peripheral vascular disorder, chest discomfort[Ref]

Dermatologic

Common (1% to 10%): Urticaria, atopic dermatitis

Postmarketing reports: Rash, pruritus[Ref]

Endocrine

Postmarketing reports: Autoimmune thyroiditis[Ref]

Gastrointestinal

Very common (10% or more): Oral pruritus (25.1%)

Common (1% to 10%): Mouth edema, tongue pruritus, lip edema, oral paresthesia, abdominal pain, dyspepsia, tongue edema, oral hypoesthesia, stomatitis, dysphagia, nausea, vomiting, esophageal pain, gastritis, gastroesophageal reflux, lip pruritus

Postmarketing reports: Diarrhea, eosinophilic esophagitis, salivary gland enlargement and/or hypersecretion, dry mouth, dry eye[Ref]

Hematologic

Postmarketing reports: Lymphoadenopathy, increased eosinophilic count[Ref]

Metabolic

Postmarketing reports: Decreased weight[Ref]

Nervous system

Postmarketing reports: Loss of consciousness, headache, somnolence, dizziness[Ref]

Other

Common (1% to 10%): Ear pruritus

Postmarketing reports: Malaise, face edema, tinnitus, asthenia, influenza-like illness[Ref]

Psychiatric

Postmarketing reports: Anxiety[Ref]

References

1. "Product Information. Oralair (mixed grass pollens allergen extract)." Greer Laboratories Inc, Lenoir, NC.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Some side effects may not be reported. You may report them to the FDA.