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Metoprolol Succinate ER Side Effects

Generic name: metoprolol

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Aug 23, 2023.

Note: This document contains side effect information about metoprolol. Some dosage forms listed on this page may not apply to the brand name Metoprolol Succinate ER.

Applies to metoprolol: oral capsule extended release, oral tablet, oral tablet extended release. Other dosage forms:

Warning

Oral route (Tablet)

Ischemic Heart DiseaseDo not abruptly discontinue metoprolol tartrate tablets USP therapy in patients with coronary artery disease. Severe exacerbation of angina, myocardial infarction and ventricular arrhythmias have been reported in patients with coronary artery disease following the abrupt discontinuation of therapy with beta-blockers. When discontinuing chronically administered metoprolol tartrate tablets USP, particularly in patients with coronary artery disease, the dosage should be gradually reduced over a period of 1 to 2 weeks and the patient should be carefully monitored. If angina markedly worsens or acute coronary insufficiency develops, metoprolol tartrate tablets USP administration should be reinstated promptly, at least temporarily, and other measures appropriate for the management of unstable angina should be taken. Patients should be warned against interruption or discontinuation of therapy without the physician’s advice. Because coronary artery disease is common and may be unrecognized, it may be prudent not to discontinue metoprolol tartrate tablets USP therapy abruptly even in patients treated only for hypertension.

Serious side effects

Along with its needed effects, metoprolol (the active ingredient contained in Metoprolol Succinate ER) may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking metoprolol:

More common

Less common

Rare

Incidence not known

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur while taking metoprolol:

Symptoms of overdose

Other side effects

Some side effects of metoprolol may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects.

Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Less common

Rare

Incidence not known

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to metoprolol: compounding powder, injectable solution, oral capsule extended release, oral solution, oral tablet, oral tablet extended release.

General

The most common adverse reactions were tiredness, dizziness, depression, shortness of breath, bradycardia, hypotension, diarrhea, pruritus, and rash.[Ref]

Cardiovascular

Very common (10% or more): Heart failure (up to 27.5%), hypotension (systolic blood pressure less than 90 mmHg) (up to 27.4%), bradycardia (heart rate less than 40 beats per minute) (up to 15.9%),

Common (1% to 10%): Cold extremities, arterial insufficiency, palpitation, first degree heart block (P-R interval 0.26 seconds or greater), second or third degree heart block, postural disorders

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Cardiogenic shock in patients with acute myocardial infarction

Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Disturbances of cardiac conduction, cardiac arrhythmia

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Intermittent claudication increased

Frequency not reported: Claudication[Ref]

Gastrointestinal

Common (1% to 10%): Diarrhea, nausea, dry mouth, gastric pain, constipation, flatulence, heartburn, abdominal pain, vomiting

Frequency not reported: Retroperitoneal fibrosis[Ref]

Other

Common (1% to 10%): Tiredness, peripheral edema, accident and/or injury, death, fatigue

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Edema, precordial pain

Frequency not reported: Lactic dehydrogenase elevated

Postmarketing reports: Chest pain[Ref]

Nervous system

Common (1% to 10%): Dizziness, vertigo, stroke, headache

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Paresthesia, somnolence, impaired concentration

Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Alertness decreased

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Amnesia/memory impairment, tinnitus, taste disturbance

Frequency not reported: Short-term memory loss

Postmarketing reports: Syncope[Ref]

Respiratory

Common (1% to 10%): Shortness of breath, wheezing, dyspnea

Rare (less than 0.1%): Rhinitis[Ref]

Dermatologic

Common (1% to 10%): Pruritus, rash

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Sweating increased

Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Loss of hair

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Photosensitivity reactions, psoriasis aggravated, gangrene in patients with preexisting severe peripheral circulatory disorders, hyperhidrosis, alopecia[Ref]

Psychiatric

Common (1% to 10%): Depression

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Insomnia, nightmare

Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Nervousness, anxiety

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Confusion, hallucination, personality disorder, disturbances of libido

Frequency not reported: Sleep disturbance[Ref]

Musculoskeletal

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Muscle cramps

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Arthralgia, arthritis

Frequency not reported: Musculoskeletal pain[Ref]

Metabolic

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Weight gain

Frequency not reported: Unstable diabetes

Postmarketing reports: Blood triglycerides increased, high density lipoprotein (HDL) decreased[Ref]

Ocular

Rare (less than 0.1%): Visual disturbance, dry and/or irritated eyes, conjunctivitis

Frequency not reported: Blurred vision[Ref]

Hepatic

Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Liver function test abnormalities

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Hepatitis

Frequency not reported: Transaminase elevated, alkaline phosphatase elevated

Postmarketing reports: Jaundice, non-specific hepatic dysfunction[Ref]

Genitourinary

Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Impotence/sexual dysfunction

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Peyronie's disease[Ref]

Immunologic

Rare (less than 0.1%): Positive antinuclear antibodies[Ref]

Hematologic

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Thrombocytopenia

Frequency not reported: Agranulocytosis[Ref]

Frequently asked questions

References

1. Product Information. Lopressor (metoprolol). Novartis Pharmaceuticals. 2001.

2. Cerner Multum, Inc. UK Summary of Product Characteristics.

3. Cerner Multum, Inc. Australian Product Information.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Some side effects may not be reported. You may report them to the FDA.