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Aspirin (rectal)

Generic Name: aspirin (rectal) (AS pi rin)
Brand Name: Aspirin

Medically reviewed on Jun 12, 2018

What is rectal aspirin?

See also: Orencia

Aspirin is in a group of drugs called salicylates. It works by reducing substances in the body that cause pain and inflammation. Aspirin also reduces fever.

Rectal aspirin is given as a suppository to reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. Aspirin is also used to treat the symptoms of arthritis and rheumatic fever.

Rectal aspirin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important Information

Rectal aspirin should not be used in a child or teenager who has a fever, especially if the child also has flu symptoms or chicken pox. Aspirin can cause a serious and sometimes fatal condition called Reye's syndrome.

Do not take an aspirin rectal suppository by mouth. It is for use only in your rectum.

This medication comes with patient instructions for using the rectal suppository. Follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Try to empty your bowel and bladder just before using the aspirin suppository.

Remove the outer wrapper from the suppository before inserting it. Avoid handling the suppository too long or it will melt in your hands.

Before taking this medicine

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to aspirin or other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Arthrotec, Cambia, Cataflam, Voltaren, Flector Patch, Pennsaid, Solareze), diflunisal (Dolobid), etodolac (Lodine), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis), ketorolac (Toradol), mefenamic acid (Ponstel), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), piroxicam (Feldene), and others.

Rectal aspirin should not be used in a child or teenager who has a fever, especially if the child also has flu symptoms or chicken pox. Aspirin can cause a serious and sometimes fatal condition called Reye's syndrome.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to use Aspirin if you have:

Aspirin may be harmful to an unborn baby, and may also cause problems with pregnancy or childbirth. Do not use rectal aspirin without medical advice if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

It is not known whether rectal aspirin passes into breast milk or if it could harm an unborn baby. Do not use this medication without medical advice if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I use rectal aspirin?

Use this medication exactly as directed on the label, or as it has been prescribed by your doctor. Do not use the medication in larger or smaller amounts, or use it for longer than recommended.

This medication comes with patient instructions for using the rectal suppository. Follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Do not take an aspirin rectal suppository by mouth. It is for use only in your rectum.

Remove the outer wrapper from the suppository before inserting it. Avoid handling the suppository too long or it will melt in your hands.

Try to empty your bowel and bladder just before using the rectal aspirin suppository.

Lie on your back with your knees up toward your chest. Gently insert the suppository into your rectum about 1 inch.

For best results, stay lying down after inserting the suppository and hold it in your rectum for a few minutes. The suppository will melt quickly once inserted and you should feel little or no discomfort while holding it in. Avoid using the bathroom for at least an hour after using the suppository.

Call your doctor if you still have a sore throat after 2 days of using rectal aspirin, if you still have a fever after 3 days, or if you still have pain after 10 days of treatment (5 days for a child). Tell your doctor at any time if you have new or worsening symptoms.

This medication can cause you to have unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using rectal aspirin.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using rectal aspirin. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Store the rectal suppositories at cool room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not refrigerate or freeze them.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since rectal aspirin is sometimes used as needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are using the medication regularly, use the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and wait until your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include severe nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea, ringing in the ears, confusion, headache, increased thirst, severe drowsiness, uncontrolled muscle twitching, shortness of breath, bloody urine, hallucinations, or seizure (convulsions).

What should I avoid while using rectal aspirin?

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using any other cold, allergy, pain, or sleep medication. Aspirin (sometimes abbreviated as ASA) is contained in many combination medicines. Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much aspirin which can lead to an overdose. Check the label to see if a medicine contains aspirin or ASA.

Rectal aspirin side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using Aspirin and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • black, bloody, or tarry stools;

  • blood in your urine;

  • coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds;

  • pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding;

  • wheezing, chest tightness, trouble breathing;

  • decreased hearing or ringing in the ears;

  • seizure (convulsions); or

  • dizziness, confusion, or hallucinations.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • nausea, vomiting, stomach pain; or

  • rectal irritation.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

What other drugs will affect rectal aspirin?

Ask your doctor before using an antidepressant such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem, Symbyax), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft). Taking any of these medicines while you are using aspirin may cause you to bruise or bleed easily.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to use rectal aspirin if you are also using any of the following drugs:

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with rectal aspirin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

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