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Medications for Hashimoto's disease (Chronic Lymphocytic Thyroiditis)

What is Hashimoto's disease (Chronic Lymphocytic Thyroiditis)?

Hashimoto's disease is a condition in which your immune system attacks your thyroid, which causes inflammation. This leads to an under-active thyroid gland (hypothyroidism). Your thyroid gland is a small butterfly-shaped gland at the base of your neck below your Adam's apple. It produces hormones that control many of your body’s functions, such as metabolism, your cardiovascular system, and your digestion, and is part of your endocrine system.

Hashimoto's disease may also be called chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, and it is the most common cause of hypothyroidism. It may occur in all ages; however, most commonly affects middle-aged women.

What are the Symptoms of Hashimoto's Disease?

Since chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis typically progresses slowly over many years, you may not notice any signs or symptoms at first. Some people may notice a swelling at the front of their throat (this is called a goiter). Damage to the thyroid gland causes a drop in thyroid hormone levels in the blood, which causes symptoms of an under-active thyroid gland (hypothyroidism), such as:

  • Brittle nails
  • Constipation
  • Depression
  • Dry skin
  • Enlargement of the tongue
  • Hair loss
  • Joint pain
  • Memory lapses
  • Muscle aches, tenderness and stiffness or weakness
  • Pale, dry skin
  • Prolonged or excessive menstrual bleeding
  • Puffy face
  • Sensitivity to cold
  • Tiredness or sluggishness
  • Unexplained weight gain.

How is Hashimoto's Disease Diagnosed?

See your doctor if you have any symptoms suggestive of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis.   Your doctor will perform a blood test to check how your thyroid gland is functioning. People who have had any of the following done will need periodic testing of their thyroid gland:

  • Thyroid surgery
  • Treatment with radioactive iodine or anti-thyroid medications
  • Radiation therapy to your head, neck or upper chest.

How is Hashimoto's Disease Treated?

Treatment for chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis may include a period of observation if there is no evidence of hormone deficiency or replacement therapy with the synthetic hormone levothyroxine. If you need levothyroxine, you usually need it for the rest of your life.

Synthetic levothyroxine is identical to thyroxine, which is made naturally by your thyroid gland. This medication restores hormone levels to normal and reverses all the symptoms of hypothyroidism.

Drugs Used to Treat Hashimoto's disease

The following list of medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of this condition.

Drug name Rx / OTC Pregnancy CSA Alcohol Reviews Rating Popularity
levothyroxine A N 117 reviews
6.1

Generic name: levothyroxine systemic

Brand names:  Synthroid, Tirosint, Levoxyl, Unithroid, Euthyrox, Levo-T, Novothyrox, Tirosint-Sol …show all

Drug class: thyroid drugs

For consumers: dosage, interactions,

For professionals: A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

Synthroid A N 29 reviews
5.6

Generic name: levothyroxine systemic

Drug class: thyroid drugs

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: Prescribing Information

Armour Thyroid A N 55 reviews
7.6

Generic name: thyroid desiccated systemic

Drug class: thyroid drugs

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: Prescribing Information

Tirosint A N 44 reviews
6.7

Generic name: levothyroxine systemic

Drug class: thyroid drugs

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: Prescribing Information

Levoxyl A N 8 reviews
6.7

Generic name: levothyroxine systemic

Drug class: thyroid drugs

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: Prescribing Information

Nature-Throid A N 25 reviews
6.8

Generic name: thyroid desiccated systemic

Drug class: thyroid drugs

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

thyroid desiccated A N 146 reviews
6.0

Generic name: thyroid desiccated systemic

Brand names:  Armour Thyroid, Nature-Throid, NP Thyroid, Westhroid, WP Thyroid …show all

Drug class: thyroid drugs

For consumers: dosage, interactions,

For professionals: A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

NP Thyroid A N 57 reviews
3.9

Generic name: thyroid desiccated systemic

Drug class: thyroid drugs

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: Prescribing Information

Unithroid A N 2 reviews
5.5

Generic name: levothyroxine systemic

Drug class: thyroid drugs

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: Prescribing Information

Euthyrox A N 4 reviews
4.3

Generic name: levothyroxine systemic

Drug class: thyroid drugs

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: Prescribing Information

Levo-T A N 1 review
8.0

Generic name: levothyroxine systemic

Drug class: thyroid drugs

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: Prescribing Information

Novothyrox A N Add review
0.0

Generic name: levothyroxine systemic

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: Prescribing Information

Tirosint-Sol A N Add review
0.0

Generic name: levothyroxine systemic

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: Prescribing Information

Westhroid A N 1 review
10

Generic name: thyroid desiccated systemic

Drug class: thyroid drugs

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

WP Thyroid A N 5 reviews
3.5

Generic name: thyroid desiccated systemic

Drug class: thyroid drugs

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

Learn more about Hashimoto's disease (Chronic Lymphocytic Thyroiditis)

IBM Watson Micromedex

Mayo Clinic Reference

ICD-10 CM Clinical Codes (External)

Legend

Rx Prescription Only
OTC Over the Counter
Rx/OTC Prescription or Over the Counter
Off Label This medication may not be approved by the FDA for the treatment of this condition.
Pregnancy Category
A Adequate and well-controlled studies have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus in the first trimester of pregnancy (and there is no evidence of risk in later trimesters).
B Animal reproduction studies have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women.
C Animal reproduction studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use in pregnant women despite potential risks.
D There is positive evidence of human fetal risk based on adverse reaction data from investigational or marketing experience or studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use in pregnant women despite potential risks.
X Studies in animals or humans have demonstrated fetal abnormalities and/or there is positive evidence of human fetal risk based on adverse reaction data from investigational or marketing experience, and the risks involved in use in pregnant women clearly outweigh potential benefits.
N FDA has not classified the drug.
Controlled Substances Act (CSA) Schedule
N Is not subject to the Controlled Substances Act.
1 Has a high potential for abuse. Has no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. There is a lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision.
2 Has a high potential for abuse. Has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States or a currently accepted medical use with severe restrictions. Abuse may lead to severe psychological or physical dependence.
3 Has a potential for abuse less than those in schedules 1 and 2. Has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. Abuse may lead to moderate or low physical dependence or high psychological dependence.
4 Has a low potential for abuse relative to those in schedule 3. It has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. Abuse may lead to limited physical dependence or psychological dependence relative to those in schedule 3.
5 Has a low potential for abuse relative to those in schedule 4. Has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. Abuse may lead to limited physical dependence or psychological dependence relative to those in schedule 4.
Alcohol
X Interacts with Alcohol.

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Further information

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