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Linagliptin Side Effects

In Summary

More frequently reported side effects include: hypoglycemia. See below for a comprehensive list of adverse effects.

For the Consumer

Applies to linagliptin: oral tablet

Along with its needed effects, linagliptin may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking linagliptin:

More common
  • Anxiety
  • blurred vision
  • chills
  • cold sweats
  • coma
  • confusion
  • cool, pale skin
  • depression
  • dizziness
  • fast heartbeat
  • headache
  • increased hunger
  • nausea
  • nightmares
  • seizures
  • shakiness
  • slurred speech
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
Incidence not known
  • Bloating
  • constipation
  • cough
  • fever
  • hives, welts, itching, or skin rash
  • large, hard skin blisters
  • large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs
  • loss of appetite
  • pains in the stomach, side, or abdomen, possibly radiating to the back
  • puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue
  • redness of the skin
  • severe joint pain

Some side effects of linagliptin may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common
  • Muscle aches
  • sore throat
  • stuffy or runny nose
Less common
  • Diarrhea

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to linagliptin: oral tablet

Gastrointestinal

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Constipation, increased amylase levels
Frequency not reported: Pancreatitis
Postmarketing reports: Acute pancreatitis[Ref]

During clinical trials, pancreatitis was reported in 15.2 cases per 10,000 patient year exposure in patients receiving linagliptin compared with 3.7 cases per 10,000 patient year exposure in those receiving active comparator (sulfonylurea). Following completion of clinical trials, 3 additional cases of pancreatitis were reported among those receiving linagliptin. Postmarketing reports of acute pancreatitis, including fatalities, have been received.[Ref]

General

The most common adverse event reported was nasopharyngitis.[Ref]

Hypersensitivity

Serious hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis, angioedema, and exfoliative skin conditions have been reported postmarketing in patients treated with this drug. These reactions have occurred within the first 3 months, with some occurring after the first dose.[Ref]

Frequency not reported: Drug hypersensitivity
Postmarketing reports: Serious hypersensitivity reactions[Ref]

Metabolic

Common (1% to 10%): Hypoglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperlipidemia, increased uric acid[Ref]

The incidence of hypoglycemia in patients treated with this drug as monotherapy, or in combination with metformin or pioglitazone, was similar to the incidence observed in placebo-treated patients. When given in combination with metformin plus a sulfonylurea, the incidence of hypoglycemia was almost 23% compared to 15% in those receiving placebo with metformin plus a sulfonylurea. As add-on to stable insulin therapy, the incidence of hypoglycemia was similar to placebo (31.4% versus 32.9%).[Ref]

Dermatologic

Postmarketing reports of bullous pemphigoid requiring hospitalization have been reported with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors use. These case typically recovered with topical or systemic immunosuppressive treatment and discontinuation of DPP-4 inhibitor.[Ref]

Postmarketing reports: Rash, angioedema, urticaria

Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors:
Postmarketing reports: Bullous pemphigoid[Ref]

Respiratory

Common (1% to 10%): Cough, nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infection[Ref]

Musculoskeletal

Between October 2006 and December 2013, thirty-three cases of severe arthralgia have been reported to the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System Database. Each case involved the use of 1 or more dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor. In all cases, substantial reduction in prior activity level was reported, 10 patients were hospitalized due to disabling joint pain. In 22 cases, symptoms appeared within 1 month of starting therapy, in 23 cases symptoms resolved less than 1 month after discontinuation. A positive rechallenge was reported in 8 cases, with 6 cases involving use of a different DPP-4 inhibitor. Sitagliptin had the greatest number of cases reported (n=28) followed by saxagliptin (n=5), linagliptin (n=2), alogliptin (n=1), and vildagliptin (n=2).[Ref]

Common (1% to 10%): Back pain, arthralgia, extremity pain[Ref]

Nervous system

Common (1% to 10%): Headache[Ref]

Genitourinary

Common (1% to 10%): Urinary tract infection[Ref]

References

1. "Product Information. Tradjenta (linagliptin)." Boehringer Ingelheim, Ridgefield, CT.

2. Cerner Multum, Inc. "UK Summary of Product Characteristics." O 0

3. Cerner Multum, Inc. "Australian Product Information." O 0

4. US Food and Drug Administration "FDA Drug Safety Communication: FDA warns that DPP-4 inhibitors for type 2 diabetes may cause severe joint pain. Available from: URL: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DrugSafety/UCM460038.pdf." ([2015, Aug 28]):

Some side effects of linagliptin may not be reported. Always consult your doctor or healthcare specialist for medical advice. You may also report side effects to the FDA.

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. This information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill , knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate safety, effectiveness, or appropriateness for any given patient. Drugs.com does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of materials provided. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the substances you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.

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