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Can Farxiga cause constipation?

Medically reviewed by Sally Chao, MD. Last updated on May 6, 2021.

Official Answer

by Drugs.com

Taking the drug Farxiga may lead to constipation in some people. The good news is that it doesn't seem to happen often. In studies, only around 2% of people taking Farxiga developed constipation, compared to 1.5% of people taking a placebo.

Constipation can cause hard stool that's difficult to pass. Some people who are constipated only have a few bowel movements per week. Medications, including Farxiga, may contribute to constipation.

Farxiga is a medication used to treat type 2 diabetes, heart failure and chronic kidney disease. It works by helping the kidneys remove sugar from the blood and flush it out through urination. This process typically causes you to urinate more often. If you're taking Farxiga, check with your doctor to see if you need to increase your fluid intake because not drinking enough fluids can also lead to constipation.

If you have constipation, drinking more fluids may soften your stool. This can make stool easier to pass, which helps prevent constipation.

Exercise is another lifestyle factor that can keep constipation at bay. Eating more foods rich in fiber can also help, such as whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables. Aim to get at least 25 grams of fiber daily, but be sure to add fiber to your diet slowly so your body can adjust. Be sure not to eat too many low-fiber foods, like meat and processed foods, because they can cause constipation.

References
  1. U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Farxiga. February 2019. Available at: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2019/202293s015lbl.pdf. [Accessed August 5, 2020].
  2. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). Constipation. Available at: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/constipation. [Accessed August 5, 2020].
  3. Farxiga FDA Approval History: https://www.drugs.com/history/farxiga.html [Accessed May 6, 2021}

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