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Trandolapril / verapamil and Alcohol / Food Interactions

There are 4 alcohol/food/lifestyle interactions with trandolapril / verapamil which include:

Moderate

verapamil ↔ Alcohol (Ethanol)

Moderate Drug Interaction

Ask your doctor before using verapamil together with ethanol. Verapamil may increase the blood levels and intoxicating effects of ethanol. This can cause symptoms of extreme drowsiness, confusion, and nausea. If you experience any of these side effect you should avoid activities requiring mental alertness. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

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Minor

verapamil ↔ Alcohol (Ethanol)

Minor Drug Interaction

Consumer information for this minor interaction is not currently available. Some minor drug interactions may not be clinically relevant in all patients. Minor drug interactions do not usually cause harm or require a change in therapy. However, your healthcare provider can determine if adjustments to your medications are needed.

For clinical details see professional interaction data.

Moderate

verapamil ↔ multivitamins with minerals

Moderate Drug Interaction

Using verapamil together with multivitamin with minerals can decrease the effects of verapamil. Talk with your doctor before using verapamil and multivitamin with minerals together. You may need a dose adjustment or need your blood pressure checked more often if you take both medications. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

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Minor

verapamil ↔ multivitamins with minerals

Minor Drug Interaction

Consumer information for this minor interaction is not currently available. Some minor drug interactions may not be clinically relevant in all patients. Minor drug interactions do not usually cause harm or require a change in therapy. However, your healthcare provider can determine if adjustments to your medications are needed.

For clinical details see professional interaction data.

Moderate

verapamil ↔ food

Moderate Food Interaction

Consumer information for this interaction is not currently available.

GENERALLY AVOID: Consumption of large quantities of grapefruit juice may be associated with significantly increased plasma concentrations of oral verapamil. The mechanism is inhibition of CYP450 3A4-mediated first-pass metabolism in the gut wall by certain compounds present in grapefruits. One study reported no significant effect of a single administration of grapefruit juice on the pharmacokinetics of verapamil in ten hypertensive patients receiving chronic therapy. In another study conducted in nine healthy male volunteers, administration of 120 mg oral verapamil twice daily for 3 days following pretreatment with 200 mL grapefruit juice twice daily for 5 days resulted in a 57% increase in S-verapamil peak plasma concentration (Cmax), a 36% increase in S-verapamil systemic exposure (AUC), a 40% increase in R-verapamil Cmax, and a 28% increase in R-verapamil AUC compared to administration following orange juice. Elimination half-life and renal clearance of both S- and R-verapamil were not affected by grapefruit juice, and there were no significant effects on blood pressure, heart rate, or PR interval. A third study reported a 1.63-fold increase in Cmax and a 1.45-fold increase in AUC of (R,S)-verapamil in 24 young, healthy volunteers given verapamil sustained-release 120 mg twice daily for 7 days with 250 mL grapefruit juice four times daily on days 5 through 7. Two subjects developed PR interval prolongation of more than 350 ms during grapefruit juice coadministration. A high degree of interindividual variability has been observed in these studies. The interaction was also suspected in a case report of a 42-year-old woman who developed complete heart block, hypotension, hypoxic respiratory failure, severe anion gap metabolic acidosis, and hyperglycemia following accidental ingestion of three verapamil sustained-release 120 mg tablets over a span of six hours. The patient's past medical history was remarkable only for migraine headaches, for which she was receiving several medications including verapamil. Prior to admission, the patient had a 2-week history of poorly controlled migraine, and the six hours preceding hospitalization she suffered from worsening headache and palpitations progressing to altered sensorium. An extensive workup revealed elevated verapamil and norverapamil levels more than 4.5 times above the upper therapeutic limits. These levels also far exceeded those reported in the medical literature for patients taking verapamil 120 mg every 6 hours, or 480 mg in a 24-hour period. The patient recovered after receiving ventilator and vasopressor support. Upon questioning, it was discovered that the patient had been drinking large amounts of grapefruit juice (3 to 4 liters total) the week preceding her admission due to nausea. No other sources or contributing factors could be found for the verapamil toxicity.

MANAGEMENT: Patients treated with oral verapamil should avoid the consumption of large amounts of grapefruit or grapefruit juice to prevent any undue fluctuations in serum drug levels. Patients should be advised to seek medical attention if they experience edema or swelling of the lower extremities; sudden, unexplained weight gain; difficulty breathing; chest pain or tightness; or hypotension as indicated by dizziness, fainting, or orthostasis.

References

  1. Bailey DG, Dresser GK "Natural products and adverse drug interactions." Can Med Assoc J 170 (2004): 1531-2
  2. Ho PC, Ghose K, Saville D, Wanwimolruk S "Effect of grapefruit juice on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of verapamil enantiomers in healthy volunteers." Eur J Clin Pharmacol 56 (2000): 693-8
  3. Fuhr U, Muller-Peltzer H, Kern R, et al. "Effects of grapefruit juice and smoking on verapamil concentrations in steady state." Eur J Clin Pharmacol 58 (2002): 45-53
View all 9 references
Moderate

trandolapril ↔ food

Moderate Food Interaction

Consumer information for this interaction is not currently available.

GENERALLY AVOID: Moderate-to-high dietary intake of potassium can cause hyperkalemia in some patients who are using angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. In some cases, affected patients were using a potassium-rich salt substitute. ACE inhibitors can promote hyperkalemia through inhibition of the renin-aldosterone-angiotensin (RAA) system.

MANAGEMENT: It is recommended that patients who are taking ACE inhibitors be advised to avoid moderately high or high potassium dietary intake. Particular attention should be paid to the potassium content of salt substitutes.

References

  1. "Product Information. Vasotec (enalapril)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  2. Ray K, Dorman S, Watson R "Severe hyperkalaemia due to the concomitant use of salt substitutes and ACE inhibitors in hypertension: a potentially life threatening interaction." J Hum Hypertens 13 (1999): 717-20
  3. Good CB, McDermott L "Diet and serum potassium in patients on ACE inhibitors." JAMA 274 (1995): 538

trandolapril / verapamil drug Interactions

There are 1013 drug interactions with trandolapril / verapamil

trandolapril / verapamil disease Interactions

There are 21 disease interactions with trandolapril / verapamil which include:

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2016 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.

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