Skip to Content

Remeron Patient Tips

Medically reviewed on Nov 21, 2017 by C. Fookes, BPharm.

How it works

  • Remeron is a brand (trade) name for mirtazapine. Experts are not sure exactly how mirtazapine relieves depression but suggest it works by increasing the activity of noradrenaline and serotonin, two neurotransmitters in the brain.
  • Remeron belongs to the class of medicines known as tetracyclic antidepressants.

Upsides

  • Used for the treatment of significant depression (Major Depressive Disorder).
  • Remeron is available as a generic under the name mirtazapine.

Downsides

If you are between the ages of 18 and 60, take no other medication or have no other medical conditions, side effects you are more likely to experience include:

  • Sedation, which may affect your ability to drive or operate machinery. Avoid alcohol. It is unclear whether tolerance develops to Remeron's sedating effect.
  • May cause orthostatic hypotension (a significant drop in blood pressure when going from a sitting to a standing position).
  • May cause weight gain, an increase in cholesterol levels, an elevation of liver enzymes, and very rarely, seizures. Dry mouth and constipation are other reasonably common side effects.
  • In susceptible people, pupil dilation may lead to an episode of angle-closure glaucoma.
  • As with other antidepressants, Remeron may increase the risk of suicidal thoughts or behavior in children and young adults.
  • Rarely, may cause problems with white blood cells; blood cell count monitoring may be required.
  • May interact with a number of other drugs including those that inhibit hepatic enzymes, cause sedation, or increase serotonin levels.
  • Interaction or overdosage may cause serotonin syndrome (symptoms include mental status changes [such as agitation, hallucinations, coma, delirium], fast heart rate, dizziness, flushing, muscle tremor or rigidity and stomach symptoms [including nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea]).
  • May precipitate a manic episode in people with undiagnosed bipolar disorder.
  • May cause a discontinuation syndrome if abruptly stopped; symptoms include dizziness, abnormal dreams, electric shock sensations, headache, and confusion.
  • May cause akathisia in some people - this is an unpleasant and distressing restlessness and a need to keep moving. More likely to occur during the first few weeks of therapy.
  • Long-term use may affect a child's height and weight. Monitor.
  • Only available as an oral tablet.
  • Rarely may cause low sodium levels; elderly people and those on other sodium-lowering drugs (such as diuretics) are most at risk.

Notes: In general, seniors or children, people with certain medical conditions (such as liver or kidney problems, heart disease, diabetes, seizures) or people who take other medications are more at risk of developing a wider range of side effects. For a complete list of all side effects, click here.

Bottom Line

Remeron is an effective antidepressant; however, its use may be limited by its prominent sedative effects.

Tips

  • May be taken with or without food.
  • Take Remeron close to bedtime as it is very likely to cause sedation. Do not drive or operate machinery if you feel sleepy as a result of taking Remeron, even if it is the next day. Avoid alcohol.
  • Seek urgent medical attention if you develop a sore throat, fever, inflammation of the mucous membranes inside the mouth (stomatitis), or other flu-like symptoms or signs of infection.
  • Seek urgent advice from an eye professional if eye pain, changes in vision, or swelling or redness around the eye develop.
  • Call your doctor immediately if a severe rash with skin swelling develops or you notice a painful reddening of the skin or blisters or ulcers anywhere on your body.
  • Let your doctor know if you experience depression, or a worsening of depression or suicidal thoughts, particularly during the first few months of therapy. Also, monitor yourself for any symptoms of serotonin syndrome (symptoms include agitation, hallucinations, fast heart rate, dizziness, muscle tremor, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea).
  • Talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking any other medications with Remeron, including those bought over the counter, because some may not be compatible with Remeron.

Response and Effectiveness

  • Peak plasma concentrations occur within two hours of a single dose. A reduction in depressive symptoms may be noticed within two to four weeks; however, it may take up to six to eight weeks for the full effects to be seen.

References

Remeron (mirtazapine) [Package Insert]. Revised 12/2015. Organon USA Inc. https://www.drugs.com/pro/remeron.html

  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use Remeron only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that this information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. This drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. It is an informational resource designed as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Drugs.com does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of this information. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2017 Drugs.com. Revision Date: 2017-11-21 01:11:40

Hide