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triamcinolone (injection)

Pronunciation

Generic Name: triamcinolone (injection) (TRYE am SIN oh lone)
Brand Name: Aristospan Injection, Arze-Ject-A, Clinacort, Kenalog-10, Kenalog-40

What is triamcinolone injection?

Triamcinolone is a steroid that prevents the release of substances in the body that cause inflammation.

Triamcinolone injection is used to treat many different types of inflammatory conditions, including severe allergic reactions, severe colitis, blood cell disorders, inflammatory eye disorders, lung disorders, acute gouty arthritis, rheumatic arthritis, and problems caused by low adrenal gland hormones.

Triamcinolone injection is also used to treat inflammation of the joints or tendons to treat arthritis, bursitis, or epicondylitis (tennis elbow). It is usually given in these conditions only as a short-term treatment of a severe or aggravated episode.

Triamcinolone is also used to treat certain skin disorders caused by autoimmune conditions such as lupus, psoriasis, lichen planus, and others.

Triamcinolone injection may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about triamcinolone injection?

You may not be able to receive this medicine if you have a fungal infection, or a condition called idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP).

What should I discuss with my health care provider before receiving triamcinolone injection?

You should not be treated with this medicine if you are allergic to triamcinolone.

You may not be able to receive triamcinolone injection if you have:

  • a fungal infection; or

  • idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP).

To make sure triamcinolone is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • an active or recent infection;

  • high blood pressure, heart disease, or history of stroke or heart attack;

  • cataracts, glaucoma, or herpes infection of the eyes;

  • a history of tuberculosis;

  • cirrhosis or other liver disease;

  • a nerve-muscle disorder, such as myasthenia gravis;

  • a stomach or intestinal disorder;

  • a colostomy or ileostomy, or recent stomach surgery;

  • kidney disease;

  • diabetes;

  • low bone mineral density; or

  • a problem with your thyroid or adrenal gland.

Steroid medicine can decrease bone formation, which could lead to osteoporosis, especially with long-term use. Talk with your doctor about your specific risk of bone loss while receiving triamcinolone injection.

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

Triamcinolone can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Steroids can affect growth in children. Tell your doctor if your child is not growing at a normal rate while using this medicine.

How is triamcinolone injection given?

Triamcinolone injection is given through a needle and can be injected into different areas of the body: into a muscle; into the space around a joint or tendon, or into a lesion on the skin. A healthcare provider will give you this injection.

Triamcinolone can lower blood cells that help your body fight infections. This can make it easier for you to get sick from being around others who are ill. Your blood may need to be tested often.

Your doctor may instruct you to limit your salt intake while you are receiving triamcinolone injection. You may also need to take potassium supplements. Follow your doctor's instructions.

This medicine can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using triamcinolone.

Tell your doctor if you have any type of surgery, illness, or medical emergency. Your dose needs may be different during times of unusual stress.

You should not stop using triamcinolone suddenly after long-term use, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Ask your doctor how to safely stop using this medicine.

Long-term use of steroids can cause harmful effects on the eyes, such as glaucoma or cataracts. If you receive triamcinolone injection for longer than 6 weeks, your doctor may want you to have regular eye exams.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Call your doctor for instructions if you miss an appointment for a scheduled triamcinolone injection.

What happens if I overdose?

Since this medicine is given by a healthcare professional in a medical setting, an overdose is unlikely to occur.

An overdose of triamcinolone is not expected to produce life threatening symptoms. However, long term use of high steroid doses can lead to symptoms such as thinning skin, easy bruising, changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your face, neck, back, and waist), increased acne or facial hair, menstrual problems, impotence, or loss of interest in sex.

What should I avoid while receiving triamcinolone injection?

After injection of triamcinolone into a joint, you should avoid overusing that joint through strenuous activity or high-impact sports. You could cause damage to the joint.

Do not receive a "live" vaccine or a toxoid vaccine while using triamcinolone, or you could develop a serious infection. Live or toxoid vaccines include diphtheria, measles, mumps, rubella (MMR), polio, rotavirus, smallpox, tetanus, typhoid, yellow fever, varicella (chickenpox), zoster (shingles), and nasal flu (influenza) vaccine.

Avoid being near people who are sick or have infections. Call your doctor for preventive treatment if you are exposed to chicken pox or measles. These conditions can be serious or even fatal in people who are using triamcinolone.

Triamcinolone injection side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • (after injection into a joint space) increased pain or swelling, joint stiffness, fever, and general ill feeling;

  • blurred vision, tunnel vision, eye pain, or seeing halos around lights;

  • unusual changes in mood or behavior;

  • shortness of breath (even with mild exertion), swelling, rapid weight gain;

  • stomach cramps, vomiting, diarrhea, bloody or tarry stools, rectal irritation;

  • fast or slow heartbeats;

  • sudden numbness or weakness (especially on one side of the body);

  • a seizure (convulsions);

  • increased blood pressure--severe headache, blurred vision, pounding in your neck or ears, nosebleed, anxiety;

  • increased pressure inside the skull--severe headaches, ringing in your ears, dizziness, nausea, vision problems, pain behind your eyes; or

  • signs of low adrenal gland hormones--worsening tiredness or muscle weakness, feeling light-headed, joint or muscle pain, craving salty foods, irritability, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, diarrhea, and weight loss.

Common side effects may include:

  • skin changes (acne, dryness, redness, discoloration);

  • increased hair growth, or thinning hair;

  • nausea, bloating, appetite changes;

  • stomach or side pain;

  • headache, sleep problems (insomnia);

  • a wound that is slow to heal;

  • sweating more than usual; or

  • changes in your menstrual periods.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

Triamcinolone dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Adrenocortical Insufficiency:

4 mg to 12 mg orally daily, in addition to mineralocorticoid therapy.

Usual Adult Dose for Ankylosing Spondylitis:

Initial:
8 mg to 16 mg orally per day. Alternatively, 3 mg to 48 mg IM per day, administered in equally divided doses every 12 hours.

Intra-articular and intrasynovial Injection:
5 mg to 40 mg once depending on the size of the joint. The average for the knee is 25 mg.

The maximum weekly dosage of triamcinolone diacetate is 75 mg.

Usual Adult Dose for Bursitis:

Initial:
8 mg to 16 mg orally per day. Alternatively, 3 mg to 48 mg IM per day, administered in equally divided doses every 12 hours.

Intra-articular and intrasynovial Injection:
5 mg to 40 mg once depending on the size of the joint. The average for the knee is 25 mg.

The maximum weekly dosage of triamcinolone diacetate is 75 mg.

Usual Adult Dose for Osteoarthritis:

Initial:
8 mg to 16 mg orally per day. Alternatively, 3 mg to 48 mg IM per day, administered in equally divided doses every 12 hours.

Intra-articular and intrasynovial Injection:
5 mg to 40 mg once depending on the size of the joint. The average for the knee is 25 mg.

The maximum weekly dosage of triamcinolone diacetate is 75 mg.

Usual Adult Dose for Rheumatoid Arthritis:

Initial:
8 mg to 16 mg orally per day. Alternatively, 3 mg to 48 mg IM per day, administered in equally divided doses every 12 hours.

Intra-articular and intrasynovial Injection:
5 mg to 40 mg once depending on the size of the joint. The average for the knee is 25 mg.

The maximum weekly dosage of triamcinolone diacetate is 75 mg.

Usual Adult Dose for Gouty Arthritis:

Initial:
8 mg to 16 mg orally per day. Alternatively, 3 mg to 48 mg IM per day, administered in equally divided doses every 12 hours.

Intra-articular and intrasynovial Injection:
5 mg to 40 mg once depending on the size of the joint. The average for the knee is 25 mg.

The maximum weekly dosage of triamcinolone diacetate is 75 mg.

Usual Adult Dose for Psoriatic Arthritis:

Initial:
8 mg to 16 mg orally per day. Alternatively, 3 mg to 48 mg IM per day, administered in equally divided doses every 12 hours.

Intra-articular and intrasynovial Injection:
5 mg to 40 mg once depending on the size of the joint. The average for the knee is 25 mg.

The maximum weekly dosage of triamcinolone diacetate is 75 mg.

Usual Adult Dose for Synovitis:

Initial:
8 mg to 16 mg orally per day. Alternatively, 3 mg to 48 mg IM per day, administered in equally divided doses every 12 hours.

Intra-articular and intrasynovial Injection:
5 mg to 40 mg once depending on the size of the joint. The average for the knee is 25 mg.

The maximum weekly dosage of triamcinolone diacetate is 75 mg.

Usual Adult Dose for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus:

Initial:
20 mg to 32 mg orally daily.

Maintenance:
48 mg orally or more daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Congestive Heart Failure:

Initial:
20 mg to 60 mg orally daily.

Maintenance:
Dosage should be continued for at least 6 to 8 weeks, to a maximum of 3 months.

Usual Adult Dose for Allergic Reaction:

Initial:
8 mg to 12 mg orally daily. Intractable cases may require higher dosage.

Usual Adult Dose for Allergic Rhinitis:

Initial:
8 mg to 12 mg orally daily. Intractable cases may require higher dosage.

Usual Adult Dose for Neuritis:

Initial:
12 mg to 40 mg orally daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Uveitis:

Initial:
12 mg to 40 mg orally daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Iritis:

Initial:
12 mg to 40 mg orally daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Keratitis:

Initial:
12 mg to 40 mg orally daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Conjunctivitis:

Initial:
12 mg to 40 mg orally daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Iridocyclitis:

Initial:
12 mg to 40 mg orally daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Chorioretinitis:

Initial:
12 mg to 40 mg orally daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Choroiditis:

Initial:
12 mg to 40 mg orally daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Loeffler's Syndrome:

Initial:
16 mg to 48 mg orally daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Sarcoidosis:

Initial:
16 mg to 48 mg orally daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Berylliosis:

Initial:
16 mg to 48 mg orally daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Idiopathic (Immune) Thrombocytopenic Purpura:

16 mg to 60 mg orally daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Hemolytic Anemia:

16 mg to 60 mg orally daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Erythroblastopenia:

16 mg to 60 mg orally daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Thrombocytopenia Idiopathic:

16 mg to 60 mg orally daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Leukemia:

Lymphoma:
16 mg to 40 mg orally daily.

Acute leukemia:
16 mg to 40 mg orally daily, up to 100 mg daily.

Usual Adult Dose for Nephrotic Syndrome:

Initial:
16 mg to 20 mg (up to 48 mg) orally daily until diuresis occurs.

Maintenance:
4 mg orally daily, or gradually reduced until discontinuation.

Usual Adult Dose for Meningitis:

Tuberculous meningitis:
32 mg to 48 mg orally daily (in single or divided doses), as an adjunct to antituberculous therapy.

Usual Adult Dose for Alopecia:

3 mg to 48 mg per day given as an intralesional injection. The average course of treatment for many conditions is 2 to 3 injections at one to two week intervals.

Alopecia areata and totalis:
25 mg to 30 mg subcutaneously once to twice weekly (at a concentration of 10 mg/mL). No more than 0.5 mL should be given in any one site.

The maximum weekly dose of triamcinolone diacetate is 75 mg.

Usual Adult Dose for Lichen Simplex Chronicus:

3 mg to 48 mg per day given as an intralesional injection. The average course of treatment for many conditions is 2 to 3 injections at one to two week intervals.

Alopecia areata and totalis:
25 mg to 30 mg subcutaneously once to twice weekly (at a concentration of 10 mg/mL). No more than 0.5 mL should be given in any one site.

The maximum weekly dose of triamcinolone diacetate is 75 mg.

Usual Adult Dose for Psoriasis:

3 mg to 48 mg per day given as an intralesional injection. The average course of treatment for many conditions is 2 to 3 injections at one to two week intervals.

Alopecia areata and totalis:
25 mg to 30 mg subcutaneously once to twice weekly (at a concentration of 10 mg/mL). No more than 0.5 mL should be given in any one site.

The maximum weekly dose of triamcinolone diacetate is 75 mg.

Usual Adult Dose for Lichen Planus:

3 mg to 48 mg per day given as an intralesional injection. The average course of treatment for many conditions is 2 to 3 injections at one to two week intervals.

Alopecia areata and totalis:
25 mg to 30 mg subcutaneously once to twice weekly (at a concentration of 10 mg/mL). No more than 0.5 mL should be given in any one site.

The maximum weekly dose of triamcinolone diacetate is 75 mg.

Usual Adult Dose for Keloids:

3 mg to 48 mg per day given as an intralesional injection. The average course of treatment for many conditions is 2 to 3 injections at one to two week intervals.

Alopecia areata and totalis:
25 mg to 30 mg subcutaneously once to twice weekly (at a concentration of 10 mg/mL). No more than 0.5 mL should be given in any one site.

The maximum weekly dose of triamcinolone diacetate is 75 mg.

Usual Adult Dose for Asthma:

Bronchial asthma:
8 mg to 16 mg orally daily.

2 inhalations (150 mcg) given 3 to 4 times a day. Alternatively, 4 inhalations (300 mcg) given twice daily. In patients with severe asthma, initial higher doses may be used (12 to 16 inhalations per day).

The maximum daily dosage should not exceed 16 inhalations (1200 mcg) .

Usual Adult Dose for Dermatitis:

Atopic and contact:
8 mg to 16 mg orally daily in a short treatment course as a supplement to topical therapy.

Usual Adult Dose for Dermal Necrosis -- Prophylaxis:

Case Report (n=1) - Extravasation of chemotherapeutic agent:
Intralesional injection, 7 to 8 mL of 10 mg/mL concentration, once weekly for 2 weeks.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Leukemia:

Acute leukemia:
1 mg/kg (up to 2 mg/kg) orally daily, continued from 4 to 6 weeks.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Asthma:

6 to 12 years:
1 to 2 inhalations (75 mcg to 150 mcg), given 3 to 4 times a day. Alternatively, 2 to 4 inhalations (150 mcg to 300 mcg) may be given twice daily.

The maximum daily dosage should not exceed 12 inhalations (900 mcg).

What other drugs will affect triamcinolone injection?

Many drugs can interact with triamcinolone. Not all possible interactions are listed here. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any you start or stop using, especially:

  • an antibiotic or antifungal medication;

  • birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy;

  • a blood thinner (warfarin, Coumadin, and others);

  • a diuretic or "water pill";

  • insulin or oral diabetes medicine;

  • medicine to treat tuberculosis;

  • a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug or NSAID (aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac, indomethacin, Advil, Aleve, Celebrex, and many others); or

  • seizure medication.

This list is not complete and many other drugs can interact with triamcinolone. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Give a list of all your medicines to any healthcare provider who treats you.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about triamcinolone injection.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 4.01.

Date modified: June 01, 2017
Last reviewed: April 16, 2017

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