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Aveed

Generic name: testosterone injectiontes-TOS-ter-one ]
Brand names: Aveed, Depo-Testosterone, Testosterone Cypionate, Testosterone Enanthate, Xyosted
Drug class: Androgens and anabolic steroids

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Mar 28, 2022. Written by Cerner Multum.

What is Aveed?

Testosterone is a naturally occurring sex hormone produced in a man's testicles. Small amounts of testosterone are also produced in a woman's ovaries and adrenal system.

Aveed is used in men and boys to treat conditions caused by a lack of this hormone, such as delayed puberty, impotence, or other hormonal imbalances. This medicine is not for use in treating low testosterone without certain medical conditions or due to getting older.

Testosterone enanthate is used in women to treat breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic) and cannot be treated with surgery.

Aveed should not be used to enhance athletic performance.

Aveed may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Aveed side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Tell your caregivers right away if you have a tight feeling in your throat, a sudden urge to cough, or if you feel light-headed or short of breath during or shortly after receiving the injection.

You will be watched closely for at least 30 minutes to make sure you do not have a reaction to the injection.

Aveed may cause serious side effects. Call your doctor at once if you have:

Women receiving testosterone may develop male characteristics, which could be irreversible if treatment is continued. Call your doctor at once if you notice any of these signs of excess testosterone:

Your Aveeds may be delayed or permanently discontinued if you have certain side effects.

Common side effects (in men or women) may include:

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Warnings

You should not be treated with testosterone if you have prostate cancer, male breast cancer, a serious heart condition, severe liver or kidney disease, or an allergy to castor oil or sesame oil. Aveed is not for use in treating low testosterone without certain medical conditions or due to getting older. Testosterone should not be used to enhance athletic performance.

Aveed is not for use in women who are pregnant.

Testosterone can increase your risk of heart attack, stroke, or death. You may need to stop using testosterone or start taking blood pressure medication.

Misuse of testosterone can cause dangerous or irreversible effects. Do not share this medicine with another person.

Before taking this medicine

You should not be treated with this medicine if you are allergic to testosterone, or if you have:

Aveed is not for use in women who are pregnant. This medicine can harm an unborn baby.

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

Using testosterone may increase your risk of developing prostate cancer, liver problems, or heart problems (including heart attack, stroke, or death). Ask your doctor about these risks.

Women using testosterone should not breastfeed.

Testosterone should not be given to a child younger than 12 years old. Some types of this medicine are not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old.

How is Aveed given?

Testosterone is injected under the skin or into a muscle, usually given every 2 to 4 weeks. Aveeds should be given only by a healthcare professional.

The length of treatment with Aveed will depend on the condition being treated.

Testosterone can raise your blood pressure, which could increase your risk of heart attack, stroke, or death. Your blood pressure will need to be checked often. You may need to stop using testosterone or start taking blood pressure medication.

You will need frequent blood tests.

Testosterone can affect bone growth in boys who are treated for delayed puberty. Bone development may need to be checked with x-rays every 6 months during treatment.

Aveed can affect the results of certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using testosterone.

Misuse of testosterone can cause dangerous or irreversible effects, such as enlarged breasts, small testicles, infertility, high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, liver disease, bone growth problems, addiction, and mental effects such as aggression and violence. Stealing, selling, or giving away this medicine is against the law.

If you have used too much testosterone, stopping the medicine may caused unpleasant withdrawal symptoms, such as depression, tiredness, irritability, loss of appetite, sleep problems, or decreased libido.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Call your doctor for instructions if you miss an appointment for your Aveed.

What happens if I overdose?

Since Aveed is given by a healthcare professional in a medical setting, an overdose is unlikely to occur.

What should I avoid while receiving Aveed?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

What other drugs will affect Aveed?

Tell your doctor about all your other medicines, especially:

This list is not complete. Other drugs may affect testosterone, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

Popular FAQ

Xyosted contains tesosterone, which is a Schedule 3 controlled substance in the US, according to the Controlled Substances Act. Continue reading

More FAQ

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.