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Mulpleta vs Doptelet - What's the difference?

Both drugs are used to treat thrombocytopenia (low blood platelet counts) in adult patients with chronic liver disease who are scheduled to undergo a medical or dental procedure. What is the difference?

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on June 27, 2019.

Official Answer

by Drugs.com

The key differences between Mulpleta and Doptelet include dosing, timing, and side effects.

Both Mulpleta (lusutrombopag) from Shionogi Inc. and Doptelet (avatrombopag) from Dova Pharmaceuticals, Inc. are once-daily, orally administered, thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor agonists for the treatment of thrombocytopenia (low platelet count) in patients with chronic liver disease.

Both drugs are used in patients who are scheduled to undergo a procedure to help to avoid bleeding and platelet transfusions.

Doptelet (avatrombopag)

Doptelet dosing starts 10 to 13 days prior to the scheduled procedure. The recommended daily dose of Doptelet is based on the patient’s platelet count prior to the scheduled procedure.

  • If the platelet count is less than 40 x109/L, the dose is 60 mg orally once a day with food for 5 days in a row.
  • If the platelet count is 40 to less than 50 x109/L, the dose is 40 mg orally once a day with food for 5 days in a row.
  • Patients should undergo their procedure 5 to 8 days after the last dose of Doptelet.
  • Doptelet is available as a 20 mg oral tablet.
  • The most common side effects (≥ 3%) reported with Doptelet are: fever, stomach pain, nausea, headache, fatigue, and swelling in the hands or feet (edema).

Mulpleta (lusutrombopag)

Mulpleta dosing starts 8 to 14 days prior to the scheduled procedure.

  • The recommended dosage of Mulpleta is 3 mg taken orally once daily with or without food for 7 days.
  • Mulpleta is available as a 3 mg oral tablet in blister packs containing 7 tablets.
  • The most common side effect (≥ 3%) reported with Mulpleta is headache.

For further information, see the prescribing information for Doptelet and Mulpleta.

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