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Juvisync (simvastatin / sitagliptin) and Alcohol / Food Interactions

There are 2 alcohol/food/lifestyle interactions with Juvisync (simvastatin / sitagliptin) which include:

Moderate

Alcohol (Ethanol) ↔ SITagliptin

Moderate Drug Interaction

Talk to your doctor before using ethanol together with sitaGLIPtin. Alcohol may affect blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes. Both hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) may occur, depending on how much and how often you drink. You should avoid using alcohol if your diabetes is not well controlled or if you have high triglycerides, neuropathy (nerve damage), or pancreatitis. Moderate alcohol consumption generally does not affect blood glucose levels if your diabetes is under control. However, it may be best to limit alcohol intake to one drink daily for women and two drinks daily for men (1 drink = 5 oz wine, 12 oz beer, or 1.5 oz distilled spirits) in conjunction with your normal meal plan. Avoid drinking alcohol on an empty stomach or following exercise, as it may increase the risk of hypoglycemia. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Switch to professional interaction data

Major

simvastatin ↔ food

Major Food Interaction

Consumer information for this interaction is not currently available.

GENERALLY AVOID: Coadministration with grapefruit juice may significantly increase the plasma concentrations of lovastatin and simvastatin and their active acid metabolites. The proposed mechanism is inhibition of CYP450 3A4-mediated first-pass metabolism in the gut wall by certain compounds present in grapefruit. When a single 60 mg dose of simvastatin was coadministered with 200 mL of double-strength grapefruit juice three times a day, simvastatin systemic exposure (AUC) increased by 16-fold and simvastatin acid AUC increased by 7-fold. Administration of a single 20 mg dose of simvastatin with 8 ounces of single-strength grapefruit juice increased the AUC of simvastatin and simvastatin acid by 1.9-fold and 1.3-fold, respectively. The interaction has also been reported with lovastatin, which has a similar metabolic profile to simvastatin. Clinically, high levels of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity in plasma is associated with an increased risk of musculoskeletal toxicity. Myopathy manifested as muscle pain and/or weakness associated with grossly elevated creatine kinase exceeding ten times the upper limit of normal has been reported occasionally. Rhabdomyolysis has also occurred rarely, which may be accompanied by acute renal failure secondary to myoglobinuria and may result in death.

ADJUST DOSING INTERVAL: Fibres such as oat bran and pectin may diminish the pharmacologic effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors by interfering with their absorption from the gastrointestinal tract.

MANAGEMENT: Patients receiving therapy with lovastatin, simvastatin, or red yeast rice (which contains lovastatin) should be advised to avoid the consumption of grapefruit and grapefruit juice. Fluvastatin, pravastatin, pitavastatin, and rosuvastatin are metabolized by other enzymes and may be preferable alternatives in some individuals. All patients receiving statin therapy should be advised to promptly report any unexplained muscle pain, tenderness or weakness, particularly if accompanied by fever, malaise and/or dark colored urine. Therapy should be discontinued if creatine kinase is markedly elevated in the absence of strenuous exercise or if myopathy is otherwise suspected or diagnosed. Also, patients should either refrain from the use of oat bran and pectin or, if concurrent use cannot be avoided, to separate the administration times by at least 2 to 4 hours.

References

  1. Richter WO, Jacob BG, Schwandt P "Interaction between fibre and lovastatin." Lancet 338 (1991): 706
  2. Neuvonen PJ, Backman JT, Niemi M "Pharmacokinetic comparison of the potential over-the-counter statins simvastatin, lovastatin, fluvastatin and pravastatin." Clin Pharmacokinet 47 (2008): 463-74
  3. Lilja JJ, Kivisto KT, Neuvonen PJ "Grapefruit juice-simvastatin interaction: Effect on serum concentrations of simvastatin, simvastatin acid, and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors." Clin Pharmacol Ther 64 (1998): 477-83
View all 8 references

Juvisync (simvastatin / sitagliptin) drug Interactions

There are 858 drug interactions with Juvisync (simvastatin / sitagliptin)

Juvisync (simvastatin / sitagliptin) disease Interactions

There are 7 disease interactions with Juvisync (simvastatin / sitagliptin) which include:

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2016 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.

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