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Eslicarbazepine Disease Interactions

There are 5 disease interactions with eslicarbazepine:

Major

Anticonvulsants (Includes Eslicarbazepine) ↔ Depression

Severe Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Depression

Antiepileptic drugs can increase depression and suicidal thoughts or behaviors in patients receiving these drugs for any indication. Patients should be monitored for the emergence or worsening of depression, suicidal thoughts and unusual changes in mood or behavior. Caregivers and family should be alert for the emergence or worsening of symptoms. Behaviors of concern should be reported immediately to the healthcare providers.

Major

Anticonvulsants (Includes Eslicarbazepine) ↔ Liver Disease

Severe Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Liver Disease

Most anticonvulsants are primarily metabolized by the liver. Metabolic activity may be decreased in patients with liver disease, resulting in elevated drug levels and increased risk of toxicity. Therapy with anticonvulsants should be administered cautiously in patients with mild and moderate liver impairment. Therapy with these drugs is mostly not recommended in patients with severe liver impairment. Caution is also advised when treating patients with a history of liver disease, since the use of some anticonvulsants has been associated with hepatotoxicity. Baseline and periodic evaluation of liver function is recommended. Therapy should be discontinued and not readministered if evidence of liver damage is observed and felt to be drug-related.

References

  1. Swinburn BA, Croxson MS, Miller MV, Crawford KB "Carbamazepine induced granulomatous hepatitis." N Z Med J Mar (1986): 167
  2. Ponte CD "Carbamazepine-induced thrombocytopenia, rash, and hepatic dysfunction." Drug Intell Clin Pharm 17 (1983): 642-4
  3. Horowitz S, Patwardhan R, Marcus E "Hepatotoxic reactions associated with carbamazepine therapy." Epilepsia 29 (1988): 149-54
View all 22 references
Major

Anticonvulsants (Includes Eslicarbazepine) ↔ Renal Dysfunction

Severe Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Renal Dysfunction

Most anticonvulsants are primarily excreted by the kidney. The plasma clearance may be decreased and the half-life prolonged in patients with impaired renal function. Therapy with anticonvulsants should be administered cautiously in patients with significant renal dysfunction. In most cases it is recommended to adjust the dosage in patients with CrCl <50 mL/min to half the usual starting dose and then increase slowly to achieve the desired clinical response. The renal function should be monitored regularly in patients receiving therapy.

References

  1. "Product Information. Trileptal (oxcarbazepine)" Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, NJ.
Moderate

Anticonvulsants (Includes Eslicarbazepine) ↔ Hyponatremia

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Hyponatremia, Hypothyroidism, Congestive Heart Failure, Adrenal Insufficiency, SIADH

Some anticonvulsants can cause clinically significant hyponatremia (Na < 125 mmol/L). Therapy with these drugs should be administered cautiously in patients with conditions predisposing to hyponatremia, such as SIADH, use of diuretics or drugs associated with inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, adrenal insufficiency, hypothyroidism, primary polydipsia, and edema (e.g., due to liver cirrhosis, congestive heart failure, or nephrotic syndrome). Serum sodium levels should be monitored during maintenance therapy, and patients should be monitored for signs and symptoms possibly indicating hyponatremia such as nausea, malaise, headache, lethargy, confusion, obtundation, and increase in seizure frequency or severity. If hyponatremia occurs, conservative measures such as fluid restriction, a reduction in dosage, or discontinuation of therapy will usually suffice.

References

  1. Steinhoff BJ, Stoll KD, Stodieck SR, Paulus W "Hyponatremic coma under oxcarbazepine therapy." Epilepsy Res 11 (1992): 67-70
  2. Van Amelsvoort T, Bakshi R, Devaux CB, Schwabe S "Hyponatremia associated with carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine therapy: a review." Epilepsia 35 (1994): 181-8
  3. Nielsen OA, Johannessen AC, Bardrum B "Oxcarbazepine-induced hyponatremia, a cross-sectional study." Epilepsy Res 2 (1988): 269-71
View all 7 references
Moderate

Eslicarbazepine (Includes Eslicarbazepine) ↔ Thyroid Function Tests

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Thyroid Disease

Dose-dependant decreases in thyroid function tests (serum T3 and T4) have been observed in patients taking eslicarbazepine. These changes were not associated with other abnormal thyroid function tests suggesting hypothyroidism. Abnormal thyroid function should be evaluated and clinicians should be cognizant of these effects when prescribing or administering eslicarbazepine therapy to patients with thyroid disorders.

eslicarbazepine drug Interactions

There are 757 drug interactions with eslicarbazepine

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

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