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Bismuth subsalicylate / metronidazole / tetracycline Disease Interactions

There are 12 disease interactions with bismuth subsalicylate / metronidazole / tetracycline:

Major

Nitroimidazoles (Includes Bismuth subsalicylate/metronidazole/tetracycline) ↔ Blood Dyscrasias

Severe Potential Hazard, Low plausibility

Applies to: History - Blood Dyscrasias, Bone Marrow Depression/Low Blood Counts

The use of nitroimidazoles (e.g., metronidazole, tinidazole) has rarely been associated with hematologic adverse effects such as mild, transient leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and bone marrow aplasia. The manufacturers recommend that therapy with nitroimidazoles be administered cautiously in patients with evidence of or a history of blood dyscrasias, and that total and differential leukocyte counts be performed before and after treatment with these drugs, particularly in patients receiving repeated courses of therapy.

References

  1. White CM, Price JJ, Hunt KM "Bone marrow aplasia associated with metronidazole." Br Med J 280 (1980): 647
  2. "Product Information. Flagyl (metronidazole)." Searle, Skokie, IL.
  3. "Product Information. Tindamax (tinidazole)." Presutti Laboratories Inc, Arlington Heights, IL.
View all 4 references
Major

Nitroimidazoles (Includes Bismuth subsalicylate/metronidazole/tetracycline) ↔ Neurologic Toxicity

Severe Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: CNS Disorder, Peripheral Neuropathy

The use of nitroimidazoles (e.g., metronidazole, tinidazole) has been associated with the development of nervous system toxicity including convulsive seizures and dose-related peripheral neuropathy, the latter characterized primarily by numbness or paresthesia of an extremity. Persistent peripheral neuropathy has been reported in some patients treated for prolonged periods. Other neurologic adverse effects include vertigo, incoordination, ataxia, confusion, agitation, hallucinations, and depression. Therapy with nitroimidazoles should be administered cautiously in patients with or predisposed to seizures or other nervous system abnormalities. Nitroimidazole therapy should be discontinued promptly if neurologic disturbances occur.

References

  1. Learned-Coughlin S "Peripheral neuropathy induced by metronidazole." Ann Pharmacother 28 (1994): 536
  2. Lawford R, Sorrell TC "Amebic abscess of the spleen complicated by metronidazole-induced neurotoxicity: case report." Clin Infect Dis 19 (1994): 346-8
  3. Schreiber W, Spernal J "Metronidazole-induced psychotic disorder." Am J Psychiatry 154 (1997): 1170-1
View all 14 references
Major

Salicylates (Includes Bismuth subsalicylate/metronidazole/tetracycline) ↔ Reye's Syndrome

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Influenza, Varicella-Zoster

The use of salicylates, primarily aspirin, in children with varicella infections or influenza-like illnesses has been associated with an increased risk of Reye's syndrome. Although a causal relationship has not been established, the majority of evidence to date seems to support the association. Most authorities, including the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, recommend avoiding the use of salicylates in children and teenagers with known or suspected varicella or influenza and during presumed outbreaks of influenza. If antipyretic or analgesic therapy is indicated under these circumstances, acetaminophen may be an appropriate alternative. The same precautions should also be observed with related agents such as salicylamide or diflunisal because of their structural and pharmacological similarities to salicylate.

References

  1. Belay ED, Bresee JS, Holman RC, Khan AS, Shahriari A, Schonberger LB "Reye's syndrome in the United States from 1981 through 1997." N Engl J Med 340 (1999): 1377-82
  2. "Product Information. Salflex (salsalate)." Carnrick Laboratories Inc, Cedar Knolls, NJ.
  3. "Product Information. Rexolate (sodium thiosalicylate)" Hyrex Pharmaceuticals, Memphis, TN.
View all 9 references
Moderate

Antibiotics (Includes Bismuth subsalicylate/metronidazole/tetracycline) ↔ Colitis

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Colitis/Enteritis (Noninfectious), Colitis/Enteritis (Noninfectious)

Pseudomembranous colitis has been reported with most antibacterial agents and may range in severity from mild to life-threatening, with an onset of up to two months following cessation of therapy. Antibiotic therapy can alter the normal flora of the colon and permit overgrowth of Clostridium difficile, whose toxin is believed to be a primary cause of antibiotic- associated colitis. The colitis is usually characterized by severe, persistent diarrhea and severe abdominal cramps, and may be associated with the passage of blood and mucus. The most common culprits are clindamycin, lincomycin, the aminopenicillins (amoxicillin, ampicillin), and the cephalosporins. Therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotics and other agents with significant antibacterial activity should be administered cautiously in patients with a history of gastrointestinal diseases, particularly colitis. There is some evidence that pseudomembranous colitis, if it occurs, may run a more severe course in these patients and that it may be associated with flares in their underlying disease activity. The offending antibiotic(s) should be discontinued if significant diarrhea occurs during therapy. Stool cultures for Clostridium difficile and stool assay for C. difficile toxin may be helpful diagnostically. A large bowel endoscopy may be considered to establish a definitive diagnosis in cases of severe diarrhea.

References

  1. Moriarty HJ, Scobie BA "Pseudomembranous colitis in a patient on rifampicin and ethambutol." N Z Med J 04/23/80 (1980): 294-5
  2. Thomas E, Mehta JB "Pseudomembranous colitis due to oxacillin therapy." South Med J 77 (1984): 532-3
  3. Harmon T, Burkhart G, Applebaum H "Perforated pseudomembranous colitis in the breast-fed infant." J Pediatr Surg 27 (1992): 744-6
View all 47 references
Moderate

Metronidazole (Includes Bismuth subsalicylate/metronidazole/tetracycline) ↔ Alcoholism

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Alcoholism

Nitroimidazoles (e.g., metronidazole, tinidazole) may inhibit alcohol dehydrogenase and occasionally precipitate a disulfiram-like reaction in patients who consume alcohol while being treated. Symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, flushing, sweating, headache, abdominal cramps, and hypotension. Patients should be instructed to avoid alcohol-containing products during nitroimidazole therapy and for at least 48 to 72 hours after the last dose. Therapy with nitroimidazoles should be administered cautiously in patients who might be prone to acute alcohol intake. An alternative therapy may be appropriate.

References

  1. Giannini AJ, DeFrance DT "Metronidazole and alcohol: potential for combinative abuse." J Toxicol Clin Toxicol 20 (1983): 509-15
  2. Harries DP, Teale KF, Sunderland G "Metronidazole and alcohol: potential problems." Scott Med J 35 (1990): 179-80
  3. "Product Information. Tindamax (tinidazole)." Presutti Laboratories Inc, Arlington Heights, IL.
View all 6 references
Moderate

Metronidazole (Includes Bismuth subsalicylate/metronidazole/tetracycline) ↔ Dialysis

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: hemodialysis

Metronidazole and its metabolites are moderately removed by hemodialysis. Doses should either be scheduled for administration after dialysis or supplemental doses be given after dialysis.

References

  1. Kreeft JH, Ogilvie RI, Dufresne LR "Metronidazole kinetics in dialysis patients." Surgery 93 (1983): 149-53
  2. Somogyi A, Kong C, Sabto J, Gurr FW, Spicer WJ, McLean AJ "Disposition and removal of metronidazole in patients undergoing haemodialysis." Eur J Clin Pharmacol 25 (1983): 683-7
  3. "Product Information. Flagyl (metronidazole)." Searle, Skokie, IL.
View all 5 references
Moderate

Metronidazole (Includes Bismuth subsalicylate/metronidazole/tetracycline) ↔ Liver Disease

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Liver Disease

Metronidazole is extensively metabolized by the liver to both pharmacologically active and inactive compounds. The plasma clearance of metronidazole may be decreased and the half-life prolonged in patients with impaired hepatic function. Therapy with metronidazole should be administered cautiously at reduced dosages in patients with severe liver disease.

References

  1. Loft S, Dossing M, Poulsen HE, et al "Influence of dose and route of administration on disposition of metronidazole and its major metabolites." Eur J Clin Pharmacol 30 (1986): 467-73
  2. "Product Information. Flagyl (metronidazole)." Searle, Skokie, IL.
  3. Farrell G, Baird-Lambert J, Cvejic M, Buchanan N "Disposition and metabolism of metronidazole in patients with liver failure." Hepatology 4 (1984): 772-6
View all 6 references
Moderate

Metronidazole (Includes Bismuth subsalicylate/metronidazole/tetracycline) ↔ Sodium

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Congestive Heart Failure, Hypertension, Fluid Retention, Hypernatremia

Flagyl I.V. RTU (brand of metronidazole ready-to-use injection) contains 14 mEq of sodium per each 500 mg dose of metronidazole. The sodium content should be considered when this product is used in patients with conditions that may require sodium restriction, such as congestive heart failure, hypertension, and fluid retention.

References

  1. "Product Information. Flagyl (metronidazole)." Searle, Skokie, IL.
Moderate

Salicylates (Includes Bismuth subsalicylate/metronidazole/tetracycline) ↔ Coagulation

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Bleeding, Coagulation Defect, Thrombocytopathy, Thrombocytopenia, Vitamin K Deficiency

All salicylates can interfere with the action of vitamin K and induce a dose-dependent alteration in hepatic synthesis of coagulation factors VII, IX and X. At usual recommended dosages, a slight increase in prothrombin time (PT) may occur. Therapy with salicylates, especially if given in high dosages, should be administered cautiously in patients with significant active bleeding or a hemorrhagic diathesis, including hemostatic and/or coagulation defects associated with hemophilia, vitamin K deficiency, hypoprothombinemia, thrombocytopenia, thrombocytopathy, or severe hepatic impairment. The same precaution should also be observed with the use of related agents such as salicylamide because of their structural and pharmacological similarities to salicylate.

References

  1. Fausa O "Salicylate-induced hypoprothrombinemia: a report of four cases." Acta Med Scand 188 (1970): 403-8
  2. American Medical Association, Division of Drugs and Toxicology "Drug evaluations annual 1994." Chicago, IL: American Medical Association; (1994):
  3. "Product Information. Pepto-Bismol (bismuth subsalicylate)." Procter and Gamble Pharmaceuticals, Cincinnati, OH.
View all 5 references
Moderate

Tetracyclines (Includes Bismuth subsalicylate/metronidazole/tetracycline) ↔ Hepatotoxicity

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Liver Disease

The use of tetracyclines has rarely been associated with hepatotoxicity. Histologic fatty changes of the liver, elevated liver enzymes, and jaundice have been reported, primarily in patients treated with large doses of intravenous tetracycline hydrochloride (no longer available in the U.S.) but also in patients receiving high oral doses of these drugs. Therapy with tetracyclines should be administered cautiously in patients with preexisting liver disease or biliary obstruction. Reduced dosages may be appropriate, particularly with minocycline and doxycycline, since the former is metabolized by the liver and the latter undergoes enterohepatic recycling. Liver function tests are recommended prior to and during therapy, and the concomitant use of other potentially hepatotoxic drugs should be avoided.

References

  1. Min DI, Burke PA, Lewis D, Jenkins RL "Acute hepatic failure associated with oral minocycline: a case report." Pharmacotherapy 12 (1992): 68-71
  2. Brogden RN, Speight TM, Avery GS "Minocycline: a review of its antibacterial and pharmacokinetic properties and therapeutic use." Drugs 9 (1975): 251-91
  3. Burette A, Finet C, Prigogine T, De Roy G, Deltenre M "Acute hepatic injury associated with minocycline." Arch Intern Med 144 (1984): 1491-2
View all 11 references
Moderate

Tetracyclines (Includes Bismuth subsalicylate/metronidazole/tetracycline) ↔ Renal Dysfunction

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Renal Dysfunction

Tetracyclines (except doxycycline) are eliminated by the kidney to various extent. Patients with renal impairment may be at greater risk for tetracycline-associated hepatic and/or renal toxicity (increased BUN with consequent azotemia, hyperphosphatemia, and acidosis) due to decreased drug clearance. Therapy with tetracyclines should be administered cautiously at reduced dosages in patients with renal impairment. Clinical monitoring of renal and liver function is recommended, and serum tetracycline levels may be necessary during prolonged therapy.

References

  1. Reddy J "Tetracycline antibiotics should be avoided in patients with renal disease." N Z Med J 94 (1981): 396
  2. Braden GL, Geheb MA, Shook A, Singer I, Cox M "Demeclocycline-induced natriuresis and renal insufficiency: in vivo and in vitro studies." Am J Kidney Dis 5 (1985): 270-7
  3. "Product Information. Achromycin (tetracycline)." Lederle Laboratories, Wayne, NJ.
View all 28 references
Moderate

Tetracyclines (Oral) (Includes Bismuth subsalicylate/metronidazole/tetracycline) ↔ Esophageal Irritation

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Esophageal Obstruction

The use of oral tetracycline capsules and tablets has been associated with esophageal irritation and ulceration in patients who ingested the drug without sufficient fluid shortly before bedtime. Therapy with solid formulations of tetracyclines should preferably be avoided in patients with esophageal obstruction, compression or dyskinesia. If the drugs are used, patients should be advised not to take the medication just before retiring and to drink fluids liberally.

References

  1. Channer KS, Hollanders D "Tetracycline-induced oesophageal ulceration." Br Med J 282 (1981): 1359-60
  2. Aarons B, Bruns BJ "Oesophageal ulceration associated with ingestion of doxycycline." N Z Med J 91 (1980): 27
  3. Nordt SP "Tetracycline-induced oral mucosal ulceration." Ann Pharmacother 30 (1996): 547-8
View all 12 references

bismuth subsalicylate / metronidazole / tetracycline drug Interactions

There are 805 drug interactions with bismuth subsalicylate / metronidazole / tetracycline

bismuth subsalicylate / metronidazole / tetracycline alcohol/food Interactions

There are 4 alcohol/food interactions with bismuth subsalicylate / metronidazole / tetracycline

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

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