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Versed

Generic name: midazolam (oral) [ mye-DAZ-oh-lam ]
Drug class: Benzodiazepines

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Oct 20, 2021. Written by Cerner Multum.

What is Versed?

Versed is a benzodiazepine (ben-zoe-dye-AZE-eh-peen) that is used to help you relax before having a minor surgery, dental work, or other medical procedure.

Versed may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Warnings

Versed can slow or stop your breathing, especially if you have recently used an opioid medication or alcohol. This medicine is given in a hospital, dentist office, or other clinic setting where your vital signs can be watched closely.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use Versed if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

  • narrow-angle glaucoma;

  • untreated or uncontrolled open-angle glaucoma; or

  • an allergy to cherries.

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

How should I take Versed?

Versed is usually given as a single dose just before your surgery or procedure.

Versed can slow or stop your breathing, especially if you have recently used an opioid medication or alcohol. This medicine should be used only in a hospital, dentist office, or other clinic setting where any serious side effects can be quickly treated.

After you take Versed, you will be watched closely to make sure the medicine is working and does not cause harmful side effects.

Your breathing, blood pressure, oxygen levels, and other vital signs will be watched closely while you are in surgery.

What happens if I miss a dose?

In a medical setting you are not likely to miss a dose.

What happens if I overdose?

In a medical setting an overdose would be treated quickly.

What should I avoid after taking Versed?

Do not drink alcohol shortly after taking Versed. Versed can increase the effects of alcohol, which could be dangerous.

Grapefruit may interact with Versed and cause side effects. Avoid consuming grapefruit products for a short time after taking this medicine.

You may feel drowsy for 24 to 48 hours after the injection. Avoid driving or hazardous activity until the effects of midazolam have worn off completely. Dizziness or drowsiness can cause falls, accidents, or severe injuries.

Versed side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Versed can slow or stop your breathing, especially if you have recently used an opioid medication, alcohol, or other drugs that can slow your breathing. Your caregivers will watch you for symptoms such as weak or shallow breathing.

Tell your medical caregivers right away if you have:

  • cough, wheezing, trouble breathing;

  • slow heart rate;

  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;

  • tremors; or

  • confusion, agitation, hallucinations, unusual thoughts or behavior.

Drowsiness or dizziness may last longer in older adults. Use caution to avoid falling or accidental injury.

Common side effects of Versed may include:

  • amnesia or forgetfulness after your procedure;

  • drowsiness, dizziness;

  • nausea, vomiting; or

  • blurred vision.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Versed?

Shortly after you are treated with Versed, using other drugs that make you sleepy or slow your breathing can cause dangerous side effects or death. Ask your doctor before using opioid medication, a sleeping pill, a muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety or seizures.

Other drugs may affect Versed, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.