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How fast does Repatha work?

Medically reviewed by Melisa Puckey, BPharm. Last updated on Sep 9, 2020.

How long does it take for Repatha to reduce LDL cholesterol levels and cardiovascular events?

Official Answer

by Drugs.com

How fast does Repatha work?

  • Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol blood levels are reduced within the first month of being on Repatha and within the first year there is a measurable risk reduction of myocardial infarction, stroke and coronary revascularization.

How long does it take for Repatha to reduce LDL cholesterol levels?

  • In the Fourier clinical trial within four weeks of being on Repatha the blood LDL cholesterol levels (median) have decreased 57% from baseline levels to 54mg/dl and with regular Repatha dosing these levels are consistently maintained to at least 50% below original baseline levels over 168 weeks.
  • The lower blood LDL cholesterol levels mean that there will be less LDL cholesterol in the blood to stick and accumulated as fatty deposits in the arteries, so over time will help prevent strokes, myocardial infarctions and coronary revascularization.

How fast does Repatha reduce the risk of cardiovascular events?

  • In the first year on Repatha in the Fourier Clinical trial, there was a 12% risk reduction in the group of cardiovascular events including cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization for unstable angina, or coronary revascularization.
  • Into the second year of being on Repatha the patient's risk for having one of these cardiovascular events decreased further to 19% from their baseline risk.
  • Although Repatha reduced this group of cardiovascular events the Fourier study showed no observed positive effect individually for cardiovascular death, rates of hospitalization for unstable angina or worsening heart failure or death from any cause.
  • Repatha did reduce the risk of having a myocardial infarction, stroke and coronary revascularization.

What does Repatha do?

  • Repatha (evolocumab) works by helping the liver reduce levels of "bad" cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol) circulating in your blood by inhibiting a protein called PCSK9.
  • Reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the blood slows the formation of the fatty deposits in the arteries (atherosclerosis) and reduces the risk of strokes, myocardial infarctions and coronary revascularization.
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