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Betamethasone Dosage

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Dec 30, 2019.

Applies to the following strengths: 0.6 mg; 6 mg/mL; 4 mg/mL; 0.6 mg/5 mL; valerate; dipropionate; sodium phosphate; acetate

Usual Adult Dose for Dermatological Disorders

Injectable 30 mg/5 mL suspension:
Intralesional treatment: 0.2 mL/cm2 intradermally (do not give subcutaneously) using a tuberculin syringe with a 25 gauge half inch needle
-Use care to make a uniform intradermal depot
Maximum dose: 1 mL total dose at weekly intervals

Comments:
-Dose requirements are variable; individualize dose based on disease and patient response.
-When a favorable response is achieved, determine maintenance dose by decreasing the dosage in small decrements; use the smallest dose needed for adequate clinical response.
-Withdraw long-term therapy gradually.

Usual Adult Dose for Bursitis

Injectable 30 mg/5 mL suspension:

Acute subdeltoid, subacromial, olecranon, and prepatellar bursitis: 1 mL intrabursal injection
Chronic bursitis: Reduce dosage once acute condition is controlled.
Tenosynovitis and Tendinitis: 3 to 4 local injections, 1 to 2 weeks apart; inject into affected tendon sheaths rather than the tendons themselves
Ganglions of joint capsules and tendon sheaths: 0.5 mL directly into ganglion cyst produced marked lesion size reduction


Comments:
-Several intrabursal injections are usually necessary for acute bursitis and acute exacerbations of chronic bursitis; partial pain relief and increased mobility can be expected after 1 or 2 injections.
-Dose requirements are variable; individualize dose based on disease and patient response.
-When a favorable response is achieved, determine maintenance dose by decreasing the dosage in small decrements; use the smallest dose needed for adequate clinical response.
-Withdraw long-term therapy gradually.

Uses: Adjunctive therapy for short-term administration (to tide the patient over an acute episode or exacerbation) in acute gouty arthritis, acute and subacute bursitis, acute nonspecific tenosynovitis, epicondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and synovitis of osteoarthritis.

Usual Adult Dose for Synovitis

Injectable 30 mg/5 mL suspension:

Acute subdeltoid, subacromial, olecranon, and prepatellar bursitis: 1 mL intrabursal injection
Chronic bursitis: Reduce dosage once acute condition is controlled.
Tenosynovitis and Tendinitis: 3 to 4 local injections, 1 to 2 weeks apart; inject into affected tendon sheaths rather than the tendons themselves
Ganglions of joint capsules and tendon sheaths: 0.5 mL directly into ganglion cyst produced marked lesion size reduction


Comments:
-Several intrabursal injections are usually necessary for acute bursitis and acute exacerbations of chronic bursitis; partial pain relief and increased mobility can be expected after 1 or 2 injections.
-Dose requirements are variable; individualize dose based on disease and patient response.
-When a favorable response is achieved, determine maintenance dose by decreasing the dosage in small decrements; use the smallest dose needed for adequate clinical response.
-Withdraw long-term therapy gradually.

Uses: Adjunctive therapy for short-term administration (to tide the patient over an acute episode or exacerbation) in acute gouty arthritis, acute and subacute bursitis, acute nonspecific tenosynovitis, epicondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and synovitis of osteoarthritis.

Usual Adult Dose for Gouty Arthritis

Injectable 30 mg/5 mL suspension:
Acute gouty arthritis: 0.5 to 1 mL every 3 days to weekly
-A tuberculin syringe with a 25-gauge three quarter inch needle is suitable for most foot injections

Comments:
-Dose requirements are variable; individualize dose based on disease and patient response.
-When a favorable response is achieved, determine maintenance dose by decreasing the dosage in small decrements; use the smallest dose needed for adequate clinical response.
-Withdraw long-term therapy gradually.

Usual Adult Dose for Osteoarthritis

Injectable 30 mg/5 mL suspension: 0.5 to 2 mL intraarticular injection
Very large joint (hip): 1 to 2 mL
Large joint (knee, ankle, shoulder): 1 mL
Medium joint (elbow, wrist): 0.5 to 1 mL
Small joint (metacarpophalangeal, interphalangeal, sternoclavicular, hand, chest): 0.25 to 0.5 mL


Comments:
-Duration of relief varies widely.
-Intraarticular injection relieves pain, soreness, and stiffness; the injection is usually almost painless.
-A portion of the dose is systemically absorbed; consider any concomitant oral or parenteral corticosteroids (especially if high dose) in determining the intraarticular dose.
-Dose requirements are variable; individualize dose based on disease and patient response.
-When a favorable response is achieved, determine maintenance dose by decreasing the dosage in small decrements; use the smallest dose needed for adequate clinical response.
-Withdraw long-term therapy gradually.

Uses: Adjunctive therapy for short-term administration (to tide the patient over an acute episode or exacerbation) in acute gouty arthritis; acute rheumatic carditis; ankylosing spondylitis; psoriatic arthritis; rheumatoid arthritis, including juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (selected cases may require low-dose maintenance therapy).

Usual Adult Dose for Rheumatoid Arthritis

Injectable 30 mg/5 mL suspension: 0.5 to 2 mL intraarticular injection
Very large joint (hip): 1 to 2 mL
Large joint (knee, ankle, shoulder): 1 mL
Medium joint (elbow, wrist): 0.5 to 1 mL
Small joint (metacarpophalangeal, interphalangeal, sternoclavicular, hand, chest): 0.25 to 0.5 mL


Comments:
-Duration of relief varies widely.
-Intraarticular injection relieves pain, soreness, and stiffness; the injection is usually almost painless.
-A portion of the dose is systemically absorbed; consider any concomitant oral or parenteral corticosteroids (especially if high dose) in determining the intraarticular dose.
-Dose requirements are variable; individualize dose based on disease and patient response.
-When a favorable response is achieved, determine maintenance dose by decreasing the dosage in small decrements; use the smallest dose needed for adequate clinical response.
-Withdraw long-term therapy gradually.

Uses: Adjunctive therapy for short-term administration (to tide the patient over an acute episode or exacerbation) in acute gouty arthritis; acute rheumatic carditis; ankylosing spondylitis; psoriatic arthritis; rheumatoid arthritis, including juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (selected cases may require low-dose maintenance therapy).

Usual Pediatric Dose for Anti-inflammatory

Injectable 30 mg/5 mL suspension:
Initial dose: 0.02 to 0.3 mg/kg/day intramuscularly in 3 or 4 divided doses

Comments:
-Dose requirements are variable; individualize dose based on disease and patient response.
-When a favorable response is achieved, determine maintenance dose by decreasing the dosage in small decrements; use the smallest dose needed for adequate clinical response.
-Withdraw long-term therapy gradually.
-Benzyl alcohol preservative is associated with fatal "Gasping Syndrome" in premature and low birth weight infants; use preservative free formulations for neonates, especially premature infants.

Renal Dose Adjustments

Use with caution.

Liver Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Dose Adjustments

Dose adjustments may be needed for changes in clinical status due to remission or exacerbation of the disease, individual drug responsiveness, and exposure to stress.

Precautions

CONTRAINDICATIONS:
-Hypersensitivity to any of the ingredients
-Intramuscular formulations are contraindicated in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura
-Administration of live vaccines is contraindicated in patients on immunosuppressive doses of corticosteroids

Consult WARNINGS section for additional precautions.

Dialysis

Data not available

Other Comments

IV compatibility:
-May combine with 1% or 2% lidocaine hydrochloride (non-parabens formulations) for local anesthesia; add lidocaine into the betamethasone filled syringe and shake briefly - do not inject anesthetic into the betamethasone bottle.
-Avoid diluents with methylparaben, propylparaben, phenol, etc. as flocculation of the steroid may occur.

Patient advice:
-Warn patients not to discontinue this drug abruptly or without medical supervision.
-Seek medical attention for fever or other signs of infection.
-Avoid exposure to chickenpox and measles; if exposed, seek medical attention promptly.

Frequently asked questions

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.