Skip to Content

Anectine (succinylcholine) Disease Interactions

There are 10 disease interactions with Anectine (succinylcholine):

Major

Neuromuscular blocking agents (Includes Anectine) ↔ histamine release

Major Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility. Applies to: Allergies, Cardiovascular Disease, Asthma

Some neuromuscular blocking agents stimulate the release of histamine, which can cause wheezing, bronchospasm, increased bronchial secretions, hypotension, tachycardia, and circulatory collapse. Hypotension may also occur due to ganglionic blockade or as a complication of positive pressure respiration. Tubocurarine appears to be the most potent inducer of histamine, followed by metocurine (no longer commercially available in the U.S.) and succinylcholine. Other agents with varying but lesser degrees of histamine-releasing properties include atracurium, mivacurium, and pancuronium (at excessive dosages). Therapy with these neuromuscular blocking agents should be administered cautiously in patients with clinically significant cardiovascular disease and/or a history of asthma or severe allergic reactions. Certain agents may prolong the QTc interval, especially during general anesthesia in pediatric patients. The initial dosage and rate of administration may need to be reduced, and hemodynamic and respiratory status carefully monitored. Neuromuscular blocking agents that appear to have little or no histamine-inducing effects include cisatracurium, doxacurium, pipecuronium, rocuronium, and vecuronium.

References

  1. "Product Information. Tracrium (atracurium)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  2. "Product Information. Mivacron (mivacurium)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  3. "Product Information. Zemuron (rocuronium)." Organon, West Orange, NJ.
  4. "Product Information. Norcuron (vecuronium)." Organon, West Orange, NJ.
  5. "Product Information. Metubine Iodide (metocurine)." Dista Products Company, Indianapolis, IN.
  6. "Product Information. Anectine (succinylcholine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  7. "Product Information. Nuromax (doxacurium)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
View all 7 references
Major

Neuromuscular blocking agents (Includes Anectine) ↔ pulmonary impair

Major Potential Hazard, High plausibility. Applies to: Pulmonary Impairment

Neuromuscular blocking agents can cause respiratory depression and paralysis. Therapy with neuromuscular blocking agents should be administered cautiously in patients with pulmonary impairment. Treatment of respiratory paralysis consists of positive-pressure artificial respiration with oxygen and maintenance of a patent airway until the recovery of normal respiration is assured.

References

  1. "Product Information. Norcuron (vecuronium)." Organon, West Orange, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Nuromax (doxacurium)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  3. "Product Information. Anectine (succinylcholine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  4. "Product Information. Zemuron (rocuronium)." Organon, West Orange, NJ.
  5. "Product Information. Metubine Iodide (metocurine)." Dista Products Company, Indianapolis, IN.
  6. "Product Information. Tracrium (atracurium)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  7. "Product Information. Mivacron (mivacurium)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
View all 7 references
Major

Succinylcholine (Includes Anectine) ↔ burns

Major Potential Hazard, High plausibility. Applies to: Burns - External

The use of succinylcholine is contraindicated in patients after the acute phase of injury following major burns. These patients are more likely to develop significant hyperkalemia which may lead to cardiac arrest. The risk of hyperkalemia typically peaks at about 7 to 10 days after injury.

References

  1. "Product Information. Anectine (succinylcholine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Major

Succinylcholine (Includes Anectine) ↔ hyperkalemia

Major Potential Hazard, High plausibility. Applies to: Hyperkalemia, Intracranial Hemorrhage

The use of succinylcholine is contraindicated in patients after the acute phase of injury following major burns, multiple trauma, extensive denervation of skeletal muscle, or upper motor neuron injury. has been associated with an elevation in potassium levels due to rapid release of potassium from intracellular sites. Therapy with succinylcholine should be administered cautiously in patients with hyperkalemic states such as extensive soft-tissue trauma, burns, chronic abdominal infections, and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

References

  1. "Product Information. Anectine (succinylcholine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Major

Succinylcholine (Includes Anectine) ↔ malignant hyperthermia

Major Potential Hazard, High plausibility. Applies to: Malignant Hyperthermia

The use of succinylcholine is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of malignant hyperthermia. Succinylcholine administration has been associated with acute onset of malignant hyperthermia, especially during the concomitant use of volatile anesthetics. If malignant hyperthermia occurs, anesthesia should be discontinued and supportive measures rendered promptly, including rapid cooling, inhalation of 100% oxygen, control of acidosis, support of circulation, and assurance of adequate urinary output. In addition, intravenous dantrolene sodium is recommended.

References

  1. "Product Information. Anectine (succinylcholine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Major

Succinylcholine (Includes Anectine) ↔ skeletal muscle myopathies

Major Potential Hazard, High plausibility. Applies to: History (Familial) - Musculoskeletal Disorder, Myopathy, History - Musculoskeletal Disorder

The use of succinylcholine is contraindicated in patients with a personal or family history of skeletal muscle myopathies. Acute rhabdomyolysis with hyperkalemia followed by ventricular arrhythmias, cardiac arrest, and death have been reported following the administration of succinylcholine in apparently healthy children who were later found to have undiagnosed skeletal muscle myopathy, most frequently Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Immediate treatment of hyperkalemia should be instituted whenever a healthy appearing infant or child develops cardiac arrest with no obvious cause soon after administration of succinylcholine.

References

  1. "Product Information. Anectine (succinylcholine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Major

Succinylcholine (Includes Anectine) ↔ upper motor neuron injury

Major Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility. Applies to: Cerebral Vascular Disorder

The use of succinylcholine is contraindicated in patients with upper motor neuron injury that can be a sequelae of cerebral vasculopathy. The risk of hyperkalemia is increased in these patients.

References

  1. "Product Information. Anectine (succinylcholine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Moderate

Succinylcholine (Includes Anectine) ↔ bradycardia

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility. Applies to: Heart Block

The use of succinylcholine may exacerbate bradycardia via vagal stimulation leading to asystole, especially after a second dose. Therapy with succinylcholine should be administered cautiously in patients with bradycardia.

References

  1. "Product Information. Anectine (succinylcholine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Moderate

Succinylcholine (Includes Anectine) ↔ glaucoma

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility. Applies to: Glaucoma/Intraocular Hypertension

The use of succinylcholine has been associated with an increase in intraocular pressure. Therapy with succinylcholine should be administered cautiously in patients with narrow-angle glaucoma.

References

  1. "Product Information. Anectine (succinylcholine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
Moderate

Succinylcholine (Includes Anectine) ↔ myasthenia gravis

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility. Applies to: Myasthenia Gravis

Depolarizing agents, including succinylcholine, should be used with caution in patients with known neuromuscular junction disease. The succinylcholine-induced neuromuscular blockade may be prolonged in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). Care should be exercised when using this agent in patients with existing, previously diagnosed MG.

Anectine (succinylcholine) drug interactions

There are 169 drug interactions with Anectine (succinylcholine)

Drug Interaction Classification

These classifications are only a guideline. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific individual is difficult to determine. Always consult your healthcare provider before starting or stopping any medication.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No interaction information available.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.