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Nicoderm CQ (nicotine) Disease Interactions

There are 6 disease interactions with Nicoderm CQ (nicotine):

Major

Nicotine (Includes Nicoderm CQ) ↔ CVD/PVD

Major Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility. Applies to: Ischemic Heart Disease, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Arrhythmias

Nicotine has dose-dependent cardiovascular effects. At dosages used for smoking cessation, nicotine may produce peripheral vasoconstriction and increase heart rate, myocardial contractility and blood pressure. Although these effects are relatively minor and clinically insignificant in most healthy individuals, complications may occasionally occur in patients with underlying cardiovascular disease, particularly if they continue to smoke during nicotine therapy. Therapy with nicotine should be administered cautiously in patients with coronary artery disease, cardiac arrhythmias, and peripheral vascular disease. In general, nicotine therapy should be avoided during the immediate postmyocardial infarction period, in severe or worsening angina, and in life-threatening arrhythmias. All patients should stop smoking completely during nicotine replacement therapy.

References

  1. Rennard S, Daughton D, Cheney R, Thompson A, Miles R, Windle J, Repsher L, Clifford DP, Schones W, Fortmann SP, Killen JD, Pe "Nicotine replacement therapy for patients with coronary artery disease." Arch Intern Med 154 (1994): 989-95
  2. Warner JG, Little WC "Myocardial infarction in a patient who smoked while wearing a nicotine patch." Ann Intern Med 120 (1994): 695
  3. Khosla S, Laddu A, Ehrenpreis S, Somberg JC "Cardiovascular effects of nicotine: relation to deleterious effects of cigarette smoking." Am Heart J 127 (1994): 1669-72
  4. "Product Information. Nicorette (nicotine)." SmithKline Beecham, Philadelphia, PA.
  5. "Product Information. Habitrol (nicotine)." Basel Pharmaceuticals, Summit, NJ.
View all 5 references
Major

Nicotine (Includes Nicoderm CQ) ↔ pheochromocytoma

Major Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility. Applies to: Pheochromocytoma

Nicotine causes the release of catecholamines from the adrenal medulla. Enhanced sympathetic activity can provoke hypertensive crises in patients with pheochromocytoma or other tumors of the adrenal medulla, such as some neuroblastomas. Therapy with nicotine should be administered cautiously in patients with these tumors.

References

  1. "Product Information. Nicorette (nicotine)." SmithKline Beecham, Philadelphia, PA.
  2. "Product Information. Habitrol (nicotine)." Basel Pharmaceuticals, Summit, NJ.
  3. "Product Information. Nicotrol NS (nicotine)." McNeil Pharmaceutical, Raritan, NJ.
Moderate

Nicotine (Includes Nicoderm CQ) ↔ diabetes

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility. Applies to: Diabetes Mellitus

Nicotine causes the release of catecholamines from the adrenal medulla, which can stimulate glycogenolysis. Patients with diabetes mellitus should be monitored more closely during therapy with nicotine, and their antidiabetic regimen adjusted accordingly.

References

  1. "Product Information. Habitrol (nicotine)." Basel Pharmaceuticals, Summit, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Nicorette (nicotine)." SmithKline Beecham, Philadelphia, PA.
  3. Eliasson B, Taskinen MR, Smith U "Long-term use of nicotine gum is associated with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance." Circulation 94 (1996): 878-81
Moderate

Nicotine (Includes Nicoderm CQ) ↔ hyperthyroidism

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility. Applies to: Hyperthyroidism

Nicotine causes the release of catecholamines from the adrenal medulla, which can exacerbate the sympathetic nervous system manifestations of hyperthyroidism such as tachycardia, angina, and heart failure. Therapy with nicotine should be administered cautiously in patients with hyperthyroidism.

References

  1. "Product Information. Habitrol (nicotine)." Basel Pharmaceuticals, Summit, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Nicorette (nicotine)." SmithKline Beecham, Philadelphia, PA.
Moderate

Nicotine (Includes Nicoderm CQ) ↔ liver disease

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility. Applies to: Liver Disease

Nicotine is primarily metabolized by the liver, and systemic clearance is dependent on liver blood flow. Although data are lacking, impairment of liver function is likely to reduce nicotine clearance to some extent. Patients with liver disease using a nicotine product should be monitored for development of undue adverse effects and signs of nicotine toxicity, including nausea, salivation, cold sweat, palpitation, abdominal pain, diarrhea, headache, dizziness, vomiting, auditory and vision disturbances, tremors, mental confusion, and weakness. If necessary, nicotine dosage should be reduced or the treatment discontinued.

References

  1. "Product Information. Habitrol (nicotine)." Basel Pharmaceuticals, Summit, NJ.
  2. Neurath GB "Aspects of the oxidative metabolism of nicotine." Clin Investig 72 (1994): 190-5
  3. "Product Information. Nicotrol NS (nicotine)." McNeil Pharmaceutical, Raritan, NJ.
  4. "Product Information. Nicorette (nicotine)." SmithKline Beecham, Philadelphia, PA.
  5. "Product Information. NicoDerm CQ (nicotine)." SmithKline Beecham, Philadelphia, PA.
  6. Benowitz NL, Jacob P, Fong I, Gupta S "Nicotine metabolic profile in man - comparison of cigarette smoking and transdermal nicotine." J Pharmacol Exp Ther 268 (1994): 296-303
View all 6 references
Moderate

Nicotine (Includes Nicoderm CQ) ↔ PUD

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility. Applies to: Peptic Ulcer

Nicotine can delay healing in peptic ulcer disease. Therapy with nicotine should be administered cautiously in patients with peptic ulcers.

References

  1. "Product Information. Nicorette (nicotine)." SmithKline Beecham, Philadelphia, PA.
  2. "Product Information. Habitrol (nicotine)." Basel Pharmaceuticals, Summit, NJ.

Nicoderm CQ (nicotine) drug interactions

There are 24 drug interactions with Nicoderm CQ (nicotine)

Nicoderm CQ (nicotine) alcohol/food interactions

There is 1 alcohol/food interaction with Nicoderm CQ (nicotine)

Drug Interaction Classification

These classifications are only a guideline. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific individual is difficult to determine. Always consult your healthcare provider before starting or stopping any medication.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No interaction information available.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.