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Escitalopram Disease Interactions

There are 9 disease interactions with escitalopram.

Major

SSRI antidepressants (applies to escitalopram) depression

Major Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility. Applicable conditions: Psychosis

Adult and pediatric patients with depression and other psychiatric disorders may experience worsening of their symptoms and may have the emergence of suicidal thoughts and behavior. Patients should be monitored appropriately and observed closely for worsening of their symptoms, suicidality or changes in their behavior, especially during the first few months of treatment, and at times of dose changes. Families and caregivers should be advised of the need for close observation and communication with the treating physician. Discontinuing the medication should be considered if symptoms are persistently worse, or abrupt in onset. It may be prudent to refrain from dispensing large quantities of medication to these patients.

References

  1. (2001) "Product Information. Zoloft (sertraline)." Roerig Division
  2. (2001) "Product Information. Prozac (fluoxetine)." Dista Products Company
  3. (2001) "Product Information. Paxil (paroxetine)." GlaxoSmithKline
  4. (2001) "Product Information. Luvox (fluvoxamine)." Solvay Pharmaceuticals Inc
  5. (2001) "Product Information. Celexa (citalopram)." Forest Pharmaceuticals
  6. (2002) "Product Information. Lexapro (escitalopram)." Forest Pharmaceuticals
View all 6 references
Moderate

Citalopram (applies to escitalopram) renal dysfunction

Moderate Potential Hazard, Low plausibility.

Citalopram (racemic) and escitalopram (the more pharmacologically active S-enantiomer) are extensively metabolized and only small amounts are excreted unchanged in the urine. No dosage adjustments are necessary in patients with mild to moderate renal impairment, as the oral clearance of citalopram has been shown to decrease only modestly (17%) in these patients compared to those with normal renal function. There is no information on the pharmacokinetics of citalopram or escitalopram in patients with severe renal impairment (CrCl < 20 mL/min). Therapy with these agents should be administered cautiously in such patients.

References

  1. (2001) "Product Information. Celexa (citalopram)." Forest Pharmaceuticals
  2. (2002) "Product Information. Lexapro (escitalopram)." Forest Pharmaceuticals
Moderate

SSRI (applies to escitalopram) hyponatremia

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility.

Treatment with SSRI antidepressants can cause hyponatremia. Caution should be used when treating patients with hyponatremia or at greater risk of hyponatremia such as the elderly, patients taking diuretics or who are volume depleted.

References

  1. (2001) "Product Information. Zoloft (sertraline)." Roerig Division
  2. (2001) "Product Information. Prozac (fluoxetine)." Dista Products Company
  3. (2001) "Product Information. Paxil (paroxetine)." GlaxoSmithKline
  4. (2001) "Product Information. Luvox (fluvoxamine)." Solvay Pharmaceuticals Inc
  5. (2001) "Product Information. Celexa (citalopram)." Forest Pharmaceuticals
  6. (2002) "Product Information. Lexapro (escitalopram)." Forest Pharmaceuticals
View all 6 references
Moderate

SSRIs (applies to escitalopram) liver disease

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are primarily metabolized by the liver. The plasma concentrations of SSRIs and their metabolites may be increased and the half-lives prolonged in patients with impaired hepatic function. Dosage adjustments may be necessary in accordance with the individual product package labeling.

References

  1. Schenker S, Bergstrom RF, Wolen RL, Lemberger L (1988) "Fluoxetine disposition and elimination in cirrhosis." Clin Pharmacol Ther, 44, p. 353-9
  2. Doogan DP, Caillard V (1988) "Sertraline: a new antidepressant." J Clin Psychiatry, 49, p. 46-51
  3. Guthrie SK (1991) "Sertraline: a new specific serotonin reuptake blocker." DICP, 25, p. 952-61
  4. Murdoch D, McTavish D (1992) "Sertraline. A review of its pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, and therapeutic potential in depression and obsessive- compulsive disorder." Drugs, 44, p. 604-24
  5. (2001) "Product Information. Zoloft (sertraline)." Roerig Division
  6. (2001) "Product Information. Prozac (fluoxetine)." Dista Products Company
  7. Lund J, Thayssen P, Mengel H, Pedersen OL, Kristensen CB, Gram LF (1982) "Paroxetine: pharmacokinetics and cardiovascular effects after oral and intravenous single doses in man." Acta Pharmacol Toxicol (Copenh), 51, p. 351-7
  8. Krastev Z, Terziivanov D, Vlahov V, Maleev A, Greb WH, Eckl KM, Dierdorf HD, Wolf D (1989) "The pharmacokinetics of paroxetine in patients with liver cirrhosis." Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl, 350, p. 91-2
  9. Kaye CM, Haddock RE, Langley PF, Mellows G, Tasker TC, Zussman BD, Greb WH (1989) "A review of the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of paroxetine in man." Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl, 350, p. 60-75
  10. (2001) "Product Information. Paxil (paroxetine)." GlaxoSmithKline
  11. Benfield P, Ward A (1986) "Fluvoxamine. A review of its pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, and therapeutic efficacy in depressive illness." Drugs, 32, p. 313-34
  12. Wilde MI, Plosker GL, Benfield P (1993) "Fluvoxamine. An updated review of its pharmacology, and therapeutic use in depressive illness." Drugs, 46, p. 895-924
  13. (2001) "Product Information. Luvox (fluvoxamine)." Solvay Pharmaceuticals Inc
  14. Finley PR (1994) "Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: pharmacologic profiles and potential therapeutic distinctions." Ann Pharmacother, 28, p. 1359-69
  15. van Harten J (1993) "Clinical pharmacokinetics of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors." Clin Pharmacokinet, 24, p. 203-20
  16. (2001) "Product Information. Celexa (citalopram)." Forest Pharmaceuticals
  17. (2002) "Product Information. Lexapro (escitalopram)." Forest Pharmaceuticals
View all 17 references
Moderate

SSRIs (applies to escitalopram) mania

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility. Applicable conditions: Bipolar Disorder, Depression

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), like other antidepressants, may occasionally cause or activate mania or hypomania. The reported incidence ranged from 0.1% to 2% in premarketing testing of several SSRIs. Patients with bipolar disorder are generally more likely to experience mania from antidepressants. Therapy with SSRIs should be administered cautiously in patients with a history of mania or bipolar disorder. Prior to initiating treatment, it is recommended to adequately screen patients for bipolar disorder, including a family history of suicide, bipolar disorder, and depression.

References

  1. Vieta E, Bernardo M (1992) "Antidepressant-induced mania in obsessive-compulsive disorder." Am J Psychiatry, 149, p. 1282-3
  2. Beal DM, Harris D, Bartos M, Korsak C, Splane G, Quant R, Starke J (1991) "Safety and efficacy of fluoxetine." Am J Psychiatry, 148, p. 1751
  3. Achamallah NS, Decker DH (1991) "Mania induced by fluoxetine in an adolescent patient." Am J Psychiatry, 148, p. 1404
  4. Lensgraf SJ, Favazza AR (1990) "Antidepressant-induced mania." Am J Psychiatry, 147, p. 1569
  5. Piredda SG, Rubinstein SL (1992) "Hypomania induced by fluoxetine?" Biol Psychiatry, 32, p. 107
  6. Guthrie SK (1991) "Sertraline: a new specific serotonin reuptake blocker." DICP, 25, p. 952-61
  7. Murdoch D, McTavish D (1992) "Sertraline. A review of its pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, and therapeutic potential in depression and obsessive- compulsive disorder." Drugs, 44, p. 604-24
  8. Laporta M, Chouinard G, Goldbloom D, Beauclair L (1987) "Hypomania induced by sertraline, a new serotonin reuptake inhibitor." Am J Psychiatry, 144, p. 1513-4
  9. Mundo E, Ronchi P, Bellodi L (1993) "Drug-induced mania." Hosp Community Psychiatry, 44, p. 689-90
  10. (2001) "Product Information. Zoloft (sertraline)." Roerig Division
  11. (2001) "Product Information. Prozac (fluoxetine)." Dista Products Company
  12. Boyer WF, Blumhardt CL (1992) "The safety profile of paroxetine." J Clin Psychiatry, 53 Suppl, p. 61-6
  13. (2001) "Product Information. Paxil (paroxetine)." GlaxoSmithKline
  14. Berthier ML, Kulisevsky J (1993) "Fluoxetine - induced mania in a patient with poststroke depression." Br J Psychiatry, 163, p. 698-9
  15. Messiha FS (1993) "Fluoxetine - adverse effects and drug-drug interactions." J Toxicol Clin Toxicol, 31, p. 603-30
  16. Peet M (1994) "Induction of mania with selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants." Br J Psychiatry, 164, p. 549-50
  17. Burrai C, Bocchetta A, del Zompo M (1991) "Mania and fluvoxamine." Am J Psychiatry, 148, p. 1263-4
  18. Dorevitch A, Frankel Y, Bar-Halperin A, Aronzon R, Zilberman L (1993) "Fluvoxamine-associated manic behavior: a case series." Ann Pharmacother, 27, p. 1455-7
  19. Edwards JG, Inman WH, Wilton L, Pearce GL (1994) "Prescription-event monitoring of 10,401 patients treated with fluvoxamine." Br J Psychiatry, 164, p. 387-95
  20. Wagner W, Plekkenpol B, Gray TE, Vlaskamp H, Essers H (1992) "Review of fluvoxamine safety database." Drugs, 43 Suppl 2, 48-53;disc. 53-4
  21. Jefferson JW, Greist JH, Perse TL, Rosenfeld R (1991) "Fluvoxamine-associated mania/hypomania in patients with obsessive- compulsive disorder." J Clin Psychopharmacol, 11, p. 391-2
  22. Diaferia G, Mundo E, Bianchi Y, Ronchi P (1994) "Behavioral side effects in obsessive-compulsive patients treated with fluvoxamine: a clinical description." J Clin Psychopharmacol, 14, p. 78-9
  23. (2001) "Product Information. Luvox (fluvoxamine)." Solvay Pharmaceuticals Inc
  24. Marshall RD, Printz D, Cardenas D, Abbate L, Liebowitz MR (1995) "Adverse events in PTSD patients taking fluoxetine." Am J Psychiatry, 152, p. 1238-9
  25. Howland RH (1996) "Induction of mania with serotonin reuptake inhibitors." J Clin Psychopharmacol, 16, p. 425-7
  26. (2001) "Product Information. Celexa (citalopram)." Forest Pharmaceuticals
  27. (2002) "Product Information. Lexapro (escitalopram)." Forest Pharmaceuticals
View all 27 references
Moderate

SSRIs (applies to escitalopram) platelet function

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility. Applicable conditions: Bleeding, Coagulation Defect, Thrombocytopathy, Thrombocytopenia, Vitamin K Deficiency

The use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has been associated with altered platelet function. Petechiae, purpura, ecchymosis, increased bleeding times, epistaxis and gastrointestinal hemorrhage have been reported. Therapy with SSRIs should be administered cautiously in patients with severe active bleeding or a hemorrhagic diathesis.

References

  1. Aranth J, Lindberg C (1992) "Bleeding, a side effect of fluoxetine." Am J Psychiatry, 149, p. 412
  2. Yaryura-Tobias JA, Kirschen H, Ninan P, Mosberg HJ (1991) "Fluoxetine and bleeding in obsessive-compulsive disorder." Am J Psychiatry, 148, p. 949
  3. Humphries JE, Wheby MS, VandenBerg SR (1990) "Fluoxetine and the bleeding time." Arch Pathol Lab Med, 114, p. 727-8
  4. Alderman CP, Moritz CK, Ben-Tovim DI (1992) "Abnormal platelet aggregation associated with fluoxetine therapy." Ann Pharmacother, 26, p. 1517-9
  5. (2001) "Product Information. Zoloft (sertraline)." Roerig Division
  6. (2001) "Product Information. Prozac (fluoxetine)." Dista Products Company
  7. (2001) "Product Information. Paxil (paroxetine)." GlaxoSmithKline
  8. Messiha FS (1993) "Fluoxetine - adverse effects and drug-drug interactions." J Toxicol Clin Toxicol, 31, p. 603-30
  9. Ottervanger JP, Stricker BH, Huls J, Weeda JN (1994) "Bleeding attributed to the intake of paroxetine." Am J Psychiatry, 151, p. 781-2
  10. (2001) "Product Information. Luvox (fluvoxamine)." Solvay Pharmaceuticals Inc
  11. Krivy J, Wiener J (1995) "Sertraline and platelet counts in idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura." Lancet, 345, p. 132
  12. Skop BP, Brown TM (1996) "Potential vascular and bleeding complications of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors." Psychosomatics, 37, p. 12-6
  13. Pai VB, Kelly MW (1996) "Bruising associated with the use of fluoxetine." Ann Pharmacother, 30, p. 786-8
  14. Alderman CP, Seshadri P, Ben-Tovim DI (1996) "Effects of serotonin reuptake inhibitors on hemostasis." Ann Pharmacother, 30, p. 1232-4
  15. Leung M, Shore R (1996) "Fluvoxamine-associated bleeding." Can J Psychiatry, 41, p. 604-5
  16. (2001) "Product Information. Celexa (citalopram)." Forest Pharmaceuticals
  17. Settle EC (1998) "Antidepressant drugs: disturbing and potentially dangerous adverse effects." J Clin Psychiatry, 59 Suppl 16, p. 25-30
  18. Hergovich N, Aigner M, Eichler HG, Entlicher J, Drucker C, Jilma B (2000) "Paroxetine decreases platelet serotonin storage and platelet function in human beings." Clin Pharmacol Ther, 68, p. 435-42
View all 18 references
Moderate

SSRIs (applies to escitalopram) seizure disorders

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility. Applicable conditions: Seizures

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may trigger seizures in approximately 0.2% of patients, and some of them are not recommended in patients with unstable epilepsy. Therapy with SSRIs should be administered cautiously in patients with seizure disorders.

References

  1. Hargrave R, Martinez D, Bernstein AJ (1992) "Fluoxetine-induced seizures." Psychosomatics, 33, p. 236-9
  2. Doogan DP, Caillard V (1988) "Sertraline: a new antidepressant." J Clin Psychiatry, 49, p. 46-51
  3. Guthrie SK (1991) "Sertraline: a new specific serotonin reuptake blocker." DICP, 25, p. 952-61
  4. Murdoch D, McTavish D (1992) "Sertraline. A review of its pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, and therapeutic potential in depression and obsessive- compulsive disorder." Drugs, 44, p. 604-24
  5. (2001) "Product Information. Zoloft (sertraline)." Roerig Division
  6. (2001) "Product Information. Prozac (fluoxetine)." Dista Products Company
  7. Boyer WF, Blumhardt CL (1992) "The safety profile of paroxetine." J Clin Psychiatry, 53 Suppl, p. 61-6
  8. (2001) "Product Information. Paxil (paroxetine)." GlaxoSmithKline
  9. Messiha FS (1993) "Fluoxetine - adverse effects and drug-drug interactions." J Toxicol Clin Toxicol, 31, p. 603-30
  10. Levine R, Kenin M, Hoffman JS, Dayknepple E (1994) "Grand mal seizures associated with the use of fluoxetine." J Clin Psychopharmacol, 14, p. 145-6
  11. Madi L, Obrien AAJ, Fennell J (1994) "Status epilepticus secondary to fluoxetine." Postgrad Med J, 70, p. 383-4
  12. Nemeroff CB (1994) "The clinical pharmacology and use of paroxetine, a new selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor." Pharmacotherapy, 14, p. 127-38
  13. Spivey KM, Wait CM (1993) "Perioperative seizures and fluvoxamine." Br J Anaesth, 71, p. 321
  14. Deahl M, Trimble M (1991) "Serotonin reuptake inhibitors, epilepsy and myoclonus." Br J Psychiatry, 159, p. 433-5
  15. Edwards JG, Inman WH, Wilton L, Pearce GL (1994) "Prescription-event monitoring of 10,401 patients treated with fluvoxamine." Br J Psychiatry, 164, p. 387-95
  16. Wagner W, Plekkenpol B, Gray TE, Vlaskamp H, Essers H (1992) "Review of fluvoxamine safety database." Drugs, 43 Suppl 2, 48-53;disc. 53-4
  17. (2001) "Product Information. Luvox (fluvoxamine)." Solvay Pharmaceuticals Inc
  18. Marshall RD, Printz D, Cardenas D, Abbate L, Liebowitz MR (1995) "Adverse events in PTSD patients taking fluoxetine." Am J Psychiatry, 152, p. 1238-9
  19. (2001) "Product Information. Celexa (citalopram)." Forest Pharmaceuticals
  20. Kim KY, Craig JM, Hawley JM (2000) "Seizure possibly associated with fluvoxamine." Ann Pharmacother, 34, p. 1276-8
  21. (2002) "Product Information. Lexapro (escitalopram)." Forest Pharmaceuticals
View all 21 references
Moderate

SSRIs (applies to escitalopram) SIADH

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility. Applicable conditions: Dehydration, Hyponatremia

The use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has rarely been associated with hyponatremia, sometimes secondary to development of the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). These events have generally been reversible following discontinuation of SSRI therapy and/or medical intervention. SSRI-related hyponatremia may be more common in elderly female patients and those who are volume-depleted or receiving concomitant diuretic therapy. Caution may be warranted when SSRI therapy is administered in these patients and patients with preexisting hyponatremia or SIADH. Serum electrolytes, especially sodium as well as BUN and plasma creatinine, should be monitored regularly.

References

  1. Abbott R (1983) "Hyponatremia due to antidepressant medications." Ann Emerg Med, 12, p. 708-10
  2. Vishwanath BM, Navalgund AA, Cusano W, Navalgund KA (1991) "Fluoxetine as a cause of SIADH." Am J Psychiatry, 148, p. 542-3
  3. Staab JP, Yerkes SA, Cheney EM, Clayton AH (1990) "Transient SIADH associated with fluoxetine." Am J Psychiatry, 147, p. 1569-70
  4. Cohen BJ, Mahelsky M, Adler L (1990) "More cases of SIADH with fluoxetine." Am J Psychiatry, 147, p. 948-9
  5. Kazal LA, Jr Hall DL, Miller LG, Noel ML (1993) "Fluoxetine-induced SIADH: a geriatric occurrence?" J Fam Pract, 36, p. 341-3
  6. Crews JR, Potts NL, Schreiber J, Lipper S (1993) "Hyponatremia in a patient treated with sertraline." Am J Psychiatry, 150, p. 1564
  7. Blacksten JV, Birt JA (1993) "Syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone secondary to fluoxetine." Ann Pharmacother, 27, p. 723-4
  8. (2001) "Product Information. Zoloft (sertraline)." Roerig Division
  9. (2001) "Product Information. Prozac (fluoxetine)." Dista Products Company
  10. Chua TP, Vong SK (1993) "Hyponatraemia associated with paroxetine." BMJ, 306, p. 143
  11. Goddard C, Paton C (1992) "Hyponatraemia associated with paroxetine." BMJ, 305, p. 1332
  12. (2001) "Product Information. Paxil (paroxetine)." GlaxoSmithKline
  13. Doshi D, Borison R (1994) "Association of transient SIADH with sertraline." Am J Psychiatry, 151, p. 779-80
  14. Pillans PI, Coulter DM (1994) "Fluoxetine and hyponatraemia - a potential hazard in the elderly." N Z Med J, 107, p. 85-6
  15. Baliga RR, McHardy KC (1993) "Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion due to fluvoxamine therapy [published erratum appears in Br J Clin Pract 1993 May-Jun;47(3):119]." Br J Clin Pract, 47, p. 62-3
  16. (2001) "Product Information. Luvox (fluvoxamine)." Solvay Pharmaceuticals Inc
  17. Llorente MD, Gorelick M, Silverman MA (1994) "Sertraline as the cause of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion." J Clin Psychiatry, 55, p. 543-4
  18. Thornton SL, Resch DS (1995) "SIADH associated with sertraline therapy." Am J Psychiatry, 152, p. 809
  19. Jackson C, Carson W, Markowitz J, Mintzer J (1995) "SIADH associated with fluoxetine and sertraline therapy." Am J Psychiatry, 152, p. 809-10
  20. Ayonrinde OT, Reutens SG, Sanfilippo FM (1995) "Paroxetine-induced SIADH." Med J Aust, 163, p. 390
  21. Kessler J, Samuels SC (1996) "Sertraline and hyponatremia." N Engl J Med, 335, p. 524
  22. Bradley ME, Foote EF, Lee EN, Merkle L (1996) "Sertraline-associated syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone: case report and review of the literature." Pharmacotherapy, 16, p. 680-3
  23. (1996) "Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and SIADH." Med J Aust, 164, p. 562
  24. Robinson D, Brooks J, Mahler E, Sheikh JI (1996) "SIADH--compulsive drinking or SSRI influence?" Ann Pharmacother, 30, p. 885
  25. Schattner A, Skurnik Y (1996) "Fluoxetine-induced SIADH." J Am Geriatr Soc, 44, p. 1413
  26. Woo MH, Smythe MA (1997) "Association of SIADH with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors." Ann Pharmacother, 31, p. 108-10
  27. Bouman WP, Johnson H, TrescoliSerrano C, Jones RG (1997) "Recurrent hyponatremia associated with sertraline and lofepramine." Am J Psychiatry, 154, p. 580
  28. Girault C, Richard JC, Chevron V, Goulle JP, Droy JM, Bonmarchand G, Leroy J (1997) "Syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone in two elderly women with elevated serum fluoxetine." J Toxicol Clin Toxicol, 35, p. 93-5
  29. Ayonrinde OT, Sanfilippo FM (1997) "SSRI antidepressants and SIADH." Aust N Z J Psychiatry, 31, p. 306-7
  30. Liu BA, Mittmann N, Knowles SR, Shear NH (1996) "Hyponatremia and the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone associated with the use of selective serotoni reuptake inhibitors: a review of spontaneous reports [publishe erratum appears in Can Med Assoc J 1996 Oct 15;155(8):1043." CMAJ, 155, p. 519-27
  31. (2001) "Product Information. Celexa (citalopram)." Forest Pharmaceuticals
  32. Settle EC (1998) "Antidepressant drugs: disturbing and potentially dangerous adverse effects." J Clin Psychiatry, 59 Suppl 16, p. 25-30
  33. (2002) "Product Information. Lexapro (escitalopram)." Forest Pharmaceuticals
  34. Palmer BF, Gates JR, Lader M (2003) "Causes and management of hyponatremia." Ann Pharmacother, 37, p. 1694-702
  35. Twardowschy CA, Bertolucci CB, Gracia Cde M, Brandao MA (2006) "Severe hyponatremia and the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) associated with fluoxetine: case report." Arq Neuropsiquiatr, 64, p. 142-5
View all 35 references
Minor

SSRIs (applies to escitalopram) weight loss

Minor Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility. Applicable conditions: Anorexia/Feeding Problems, Malnourished, Weight Loss/Failure to Thrive

The use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may occasionally cause significant weight loss, which may be undesirable in patients suffering from anorexia, malnutrition or excessive weight loss. Anorexia may occur in approximately 5% to 10% of patients. Weight change should be monitored during therapy if an SSRI is used in these patients.

References

  1. Oliveros SC, Iruela LM, Caballero L, Baca E (1992) "Fluoxetine-induced anorexia in a bulimic patient." Am J Psychiatry, 149, p. 1113-4
  2. (2001) "Product Information. Zoloft (sertraline)." Roerig Division
  3. (2001) "Product Information. Prozac (fluoxetine)." Dista Products Company
  4. (2001) "Product Information. Paxil (paroxetine)." GlaxoSmithKline
  5. Vaz FJ, Salcedo MS (1994) "Fluoxetine-induced anorexia in a bulimic patient with antecedents of anorexia nervosa." J Clin Psychiatry, 55, p. 118-9
  6. Meyerowitz W, Jaramillo JDC (1994) "Sertraline treatment and weight loss." Curr Ther Res Clin Exp, 55, p. 1176-81
  7. Fernstrom MH, Massoudi M, Kupfer DJ (1988) "Fluvoxamine and weight loss." Biol Psychiatry, 24, p. 948-9
  8. Wagner W, Plekkenpol B, Gray TE, Vlaskamp H, Essers H (1992) "Review of fluvoxamine safety database." Drugs, 43 Suppl 2, 48-53;disc. 53-4
  9. (2001) "Product Information. Luvox (fluvoxamine)." Solvay Pharmaceuticals Inc
  10. Fichtner CG, Braum BG (1994) "Hyperphagia and weight loss during fluoxetine treatment." Ann Pharmacother, 28, p. 1350-2
  11. (2001) "Product Information. Celexa (citalopram)." Forest Pharmaceuticals
View all 11 references

Escitalopram drug interactions

There are 688 drug interactions with escitalopram.

Escitalopram alcohol/food interactions

There is 1 alcohol/food interaction with escitalopram.


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Drug Interaction Classification

These classifications are only a guideline. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific individual is difficult to determine. Always consult your healthcare provider before starting or stopping any medication.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No interaction information available.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.