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Colestipol Disease Interactions

There are 5 disease interactions with colestipol:

Moderate

Bile Acid Sequestrants (Includes Colestipol) ↔ Biliary Obstruction

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Biliary Obstruction

The use of bile acid sequestrants is contraindicated in patients with complete biliary obstruction where bile is not secreted into the intestine. These agents adsorb and combine with bile acids in the intestine to form an insoluble complex that is excreted in the feces, resulting in partial removal of bile acids from the enterohepatic circulation. Bile acid sequestrants are ineffective if bile does not reach the intestine.

References

  1. "Product Information. Questran (cholestyramine)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
Moderate

Bile Acid Sequestrants (Includes Colestipol) ↔ Constipation

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Constipation, Hemorrhoids, Ischemic Heart Disease

The use of bile acid sequestrants may produce or worsen preexisting constipation. Constipation associated with these agents may aggravate hemorrhoids. Therapy with bile acid sequestrants should be administered cautiously in patients with preexisting constipation, hemorrhoids, or symptomatic coronary artery disease. The dosage should be increased very gradually according to manufacturer guidelines to minimize the risk of fecal impaction, and patients should be encouraged to increase fluid and fiber intake. Occasional use of a stool softener may also be indicated. If constipation worsens or develops during therapy, or the desired therapeutic response is not achieved at the maximum recommended daily dosage, combination therapy or an alternative agent should be considered.

References

  1. "Product Information. Colestid (colestipol HCI)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  2. Heel RC, Brogden RN, Pakes GE, Speight TM, Avery GS "Colestipol: a review of its pharmacological properties and therapeutic efficacy in patients with hypercholesterolaemia." Drugs 19 (1980): 161-80
  3. Faergeman O "Effects and side-effects of treatment of hypercholesterolemia with cholestyramine and neomycin." Acta Med Scand 194 (1973): 165-7
View all 6 references
Moderate

Bile Acid Sequestrants (Includes Colestipol) ↔ Hyperchloremia

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Renal Dysfunction, Dehydration

Bile acid sequestrants are chloride forms of anion exchange resins and may produce hyperchloremic acidosis with chronic use. Therapy with bile acid sequestrants should be administered cautiously in patients who may be particularly susceptible, including children or smaller patients and patients with renal impairment or volume depletion.

References

  1. Kleinman PK "Letter: Cholestyramine and metabolic acidosis." N Engl J Med 290 (1974): 861
  2. "Product Information. Questran (cholestyramine)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  3. Scheel PJ Jr, Whelton A, Rossiter K, Watson A "Cholestyramine-induced hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis." J Clin Pharmacol 32 (1992): 536-8
View all 7 references
Moderate

Bile Acid Sequestrants (Includes Colestipol) ↔ Pku

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Phenylketonuria

Questran Light and LoCholest Light (brands of cholestyramine) contain 16.8 mg and 22.4 mg of phenylalanine, respectively, per each dose. Flavored Colestid (brand of colestipol) contains 18.2 mg of phenylalanine per each 7.5-gram dose. The phenylalanine content should be considered when these products are used in patients who must restrict their intake of phenylalanine (i.e. phenylketonurics). Regular Colestid, Questran and LoCholest do not contain phenylalanine.

References

  1. "Product Information. Questran Light (cholestyramine)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Questran (cholestyramine)." Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ.
  3. "Product Information. Colestid (colestipol HCI)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
Moderate

Bile Acid Sequestrants (Includes Colestipol) ↔ Vitamin/Folate Deficiency

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Coagulation Defect, Anemia, Thrombocytopathy, Thrombocytopenia, Vitamin K Deficiency, Folic Acid/Cyanocobalamin Deficiency, Vitamin A Deficiency, Vitamin D Deficiency

Bile acid sequestrants may interfere with the absorption of folic acid and fat soluble vitamins such as A, D, and K. Chronic use of bile acid sequestrants may cause increased bleeding tendency due to hypoprothrombinemia associated with vitamin K deficiency. Anemia may also occur due to reduced serum or red blood cell folate. Supplementation with oral vitamins and/or folate should be considered during prolonged therapy with bile acid sequestrants, particularly in patients with preexisting vitamin and/or folate deficiencies, anemia, or a bleeding diathesis.

References

  1. Heaton KW, Lever JV, Barnard D "Osteomalacia associated with cholestyramine therapy for postileectomy diarrhea." Gastroenterology 62 (1972): 642-6
  2. "Product Information. Colestid (colestipol HCI)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  3. Gross L, Brotman M "Hypoprothrombinemia and hemorrhage associated with cholestyramine therapy." Ann Intern Med 72 (1970): 95-6
View all 5 references

colestipol drug Interactions

There are 130 drug interactions with colestipol

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

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