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Oxytrol Side Effects

Generic name: oxybutynin

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Aug 1, 2022.

Note: This document contains side effect information about oxybutynin. Some of the dosage forms listed on this page may not apply to the brand name Oxytrol.

Summary

Common side effects of Oxytrol include: local pruritus. See below for a comprehensive list of adverse effects.

For the Consumer

Applies to oxybutynin: transdermal gel/jelly, transdermal patch extended release

Side effects requiring immediate medical attention

Along with its needed effects, oxybutynin (the active ingredient contained in Oxytrol) may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking oxybutynin:

More common

  • Bladder pain
  • blistering, crusting, irritation, itching, or reddening of the skin
  • bloody or cloudy urine
  • burning, skin rash, swelling, soreness, redness, pain, itching, or irritation at the application site
  • cracked, dry, or scaly skin
  • difficult, burning, or painful urination
  • frequent urge to urinate
  • lower back or side pain
  • unusually warm skin

Less common

Incidence not known

  • Confusion as to time, place, or person
  • holding false beliefs that cannot be changed by fact
  • seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not there
  • unusual excitement, nervousness, or restlessness

Side effects not requiring immediate medical attention

Some side effects of oxybutynin may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects.

Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common

Less common

  • Back pain
  • bloated feeling
  • changes in vision
  • constipation
  • excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines
  • feeling of fullness
  • muscle aches
  • passing gas
  • sleepiness or unusual drowsiness

Incidence not known

  • Forgetfulness

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to oxybutynin: oral syrup, oral tablet, oral tablet extended release, transdermal film extended release, transdermal gel

Hypersensitivity

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Hypersensitivity

Frequency not reported: Anaphylactic reaction[Ref]

Cardiovascular

Common (1% to 10%): Palpitations

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Cardiac arrhythmia tachycardia, vasodilation, hypertension, flushing

Frequency not reported: Heat stroke[Ref]

Dermatologic

Very common (10% or more): Dry skin, pruritus

Common (1% to 10%): Flushing, rash

Frequency not reported: Angioedema, hypohidrosis[Ref]

Endocrine

Postmarketing reports: Decreased lactation[Ref]

Gastrointestinal

Very common (10% or more): Dry mouth (up to 72%), constipation (up to 15%), nausea

Common (1% to 10%): Diarrhea, dyspepsia, abdominal pain, vomiting, flatulence, gastroesophageal reflux disease

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Abdominal discomfort

Frequency not reported: Pseudo-obstruction in patients at risk (elderly or patients with constipation and treated with other drugs that decrease intestinal motility), decreased GI motility[Ref]

General

The most common (incidence 5% or greater) adverse reactions were dry mouth, constipation, diarrhea, headache, somnolence, and dizziness.[Ref]

Genitourinary

Common (1% to 10%): Urinary tract infection, urinary hesitation, urinary retention, dysuria, increased post void retention

Frequency not reported: Impotence, suppression of lactation, cystitis, aggravation of prostatic hypertrophy[Ref]

Immunologic

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Fungal infection[Ref]

Local

Very common (10% or more): Application site pruritus (16.8%)

Common (1% to 10%): Application site erythema, application site vesicles, application site rash, application site macules[Ref]

Metabolic

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Anorexia, fluid retention[Ref]

Musculoskeletal

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Back pain[Ref]

Nervous system

Very common (10% or more): Dizziness (up to 17%), somnolence (up to 14%), headache, drowsiness, confusion

Common (1% to 10%): Dysgeusia

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Dysphagia, convulsions

Frequency not reported: Cognitive disorders in elderly, convulsions, agitation, nightmares, anxiety, paranoia, symptoms of depression, hallucinations, asthenia, insomnia, restlessness, dependence to this drug (in patients with history of drug or substance abuse)[Ref]

Ocular

Common (1% to 10%): Blurred vision, dry eye, abnormal vision

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Angle closure glaucoma

Frequency not reported: Onset of narrow-angle glaucoma, mydriasis, intraocular hypertension, amblyopia, cycloplegia, decreased lacrimation[Ref]

Other

Common (1% to 10%): Fatigue

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Dysphonia, thirst

Frequency not reported: Falls, accidental injury[Ref]

Psychiatric

Common (1% to 10%): Insomnia, nervousness

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Hallucinations, confusional state, agitation, memory impairment

Frequency not reported: Psychotic disorder, anxiety, nightmares, paranoia, abnormal behavior[Ref]

Respiratory

Common (1% to 10%): Cough, oropharyngeal pain, dry throat, nasal dryness

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Upper respiratory tract infection, rhinitis, chest discomfort, hoarseness

Rare (0.01% to 0.1%): Nasal congestion, throat irritation[Ref]

Other

Concomitant use of oxybutynin (the active ingredient contained in Oxytrol) with carbamazepine and dantrolene has been associated with adverse events suggestive of carbamazepine toxicity, such as vomiting, drowsiness, confusion, unsteadiness, slurred speech, and nystagmus.

References

1. "Product Information. Ditropan (oxybutynin)." Hoechst Marion Roussel (2001):

2. Cerner Multum, Inc. "UK Summary of Product Characteristics." O 0

3. Pharmaceutical Society of Australia "APPGuide online. Australian prescription products guide online. http://www.appco.com.au/appguide/default.asp." (2006):

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Some side effects may not be reported. You may report them to the FDA.