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Clioquinol / Hydrocortisone Topical Dosage

Medically reviewed on June 5, 2017.

Applies to the following strengths: 3%-1%; 3%-0.5%; 3%-0.5% with emollients

Usual Adult Dose for:

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

Additional dosage information:

Usual Adult Dose for Dermatitis

Apply a thin layer topically to the affected area(s) 2 to 4 times a day or as directed

Comments: This product has not been found by the US FDA to be safe and effective and the product labeling has not been approved.

Uses: Based on a review of this drug by the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council and/or other information, FDA has classified the indications as follows:
-Possibly effective: Contact or atopic dermatitis; impetiginized eczema; nummular eczema; infantile eczema; endogenous chronic infectious dermatitis; stasis dermatitis; pyoderma; nuchal eczema and chronic eczematoid otitis externa; acne urticata; localized or disseminated neurodermatitis; lichen simplex chronicus; anogenital pruritus (vulvae, scroti, ani); folliculitis; bacterial dermatoses; mycotic dermatoses such as tinea (capitis, cruris, corporis, pedis); moniliasis; intertrigo

Usual Adult Dose for Eczema

Apply a thin layer topically to the affected area(s) 2 to 4 times a day or as directed

Comments: This product has not been found by the US FDA to be safe and effective and the product labeling has not been approved.

Uses: Based on a review of this drug by the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council and/or other information, FDA has classified the indications as follows:
-Possibly effective: Contact or atopic dermatitis; impetiginized eczema; nummular eczema; infantile eczema; endogenous chronic infectious dermatitis; stasis dermatitis; pyoderma; nuchal eczema and chronic eczematoid otitis externa; acne urticata; localized or disseminated neurodermatitis; lichen simplex chronicus; anogenital pruritus (vulvae, scroti, ani); folliculitis; bacterial dermatoses; mycotic dermatoses such as tinea (capitis, cruris, corporis, pedis); moniliasis; intertrigo

Usual Adult Dose for Pruritus

Apply a thin layer topically to the affected area(s) 2 to 4 times a day or as directed

Comments: This product has not been found by the US FDA to be safe and effective and the product labeling has not been approved.

Uses: Based on a review of this drug by the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council and/or other information, FDA has classified the indications as follows:
-Possibly effective: Contact or atopic dermatitis; impetiginized eczema; nummular eczema; infantile eczema; endogenous chronic infectious dermatitis; stasis dermatitis; pyoderma; nuchal eczema and chronic eczematoid otitis externa; acne urticata; localized or disseminated neurodermatitis; lichen simplex chronicus; anogenital pruritus (vulvae, scroti, ani); folliculitis; bacterial dermatoses; mycotic dermatoses such as tinea (capitis, cruris, corporis, pedis); moniliasis; intertrigo

Usual Pediatric Dose for Dermatitis

2 years or older: Apply a thin layer topically to the affected area(s) 2 to 4 times a day or as directed

Comments:
-This product has not been found by the US FDA to be safe and effective and the product labeling has not been approved.
-Administration of topical corticosteroids to children should be limited to the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration possible.
-Chronic corticosteroid therapy may interfere with growth and development in pediatric patients.

Uses: Based on a review of this drug by the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council and/or other information, FDA has classified the indications as follows:
-Possibly effective: Contact or atopic dermatitis; impetiginized eczema; nummular eczema; infantile eczema; endogenous chronic infectious dermatitis; stasis dermatitis; pyoderma; nuchal eczema and chronic eczematoid otitis externa; acne urticata; localized or disseminated neurodermatitis; lichen simplex chronicus; anogenital pruritus (vulvae, scroti, ani); folliculitis; bacterial dermatoses; mycotic dermatoses such as tinea (capitis, cruris, corporis, pedis); moniliasis; intertrigo

Usual Pediatric Dose for Eczema

2 years or older: Apply a thin layer topically to the affected area(s) 2 to 4 times a day or as directed

Comments:
-This product has not been found by the US FDA to be safe and effective and the product labeling has not been approved.
-Administration of topical corticosteroids to children should be limited to the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration possible.
-Chronic corticosteroid therapy may interfere with growth and development in pediatric patients.

Uses: Based on a review of this drug by the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council and/or other information, FDA has classified the indications as follows:
-Possibly effective: Contact or atopic dermatitis; impetiginized eczema; nummular eczema; infantile eczema; endogenous chronic infectious dermatitis; stasis dermatitis; pyoderma; nuchal eczema and chronic eczematoid otitis externa; acne urticata; localized or disseminated neurodermatitis; lichen simplex chronicus; anogenital pruritus (vulvae, scroti, ani); folliculitis; bacterial dermatoses; mycotic dermatoses such as tinea (capitis, cruris, corporis, pedis); moniliasis; intertrigo

Usual Pediatric Dose for Pruritus

2 years or older: Apply a thin layer topically to the affected area(s) 2 to 4 times a day or as directed

Comments:
-This product has not been found by the US FDA to be safe and effective and the product labeling has not been approved.
-Administration of topical corticosteroids to children should be limited to the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration possible.
-Chronic corticosteroid therapy may interfere with growth and development in pediatric patients.

Uses: Based on a review of this drug by the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council and/or other information, FDA has classified the indications as follows:
-Possibly effective: Contact or atopic dermatitis; impetiginized eczema; nummular eczema; infantile eczema; endogenous chronic infectious dermatitis; stasis dermatitis; pyoderma; nuchal eczema and chronic eczematoid otitis externa; acne urticata; localized or disseminated neurodermatitis; lichen simplex chronicus; anogenital pruritus (vulvae, scroti, ani); folliculitis; bacterial dermatoses; mycotic dermatoses such as tinea (capitis, cruris, corporis, pedis); moniliasis; intertrigo

Renal Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Liver Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Precautions

Safety and efficacy have not been established in patients younger than 2 years.

Consult WARNINGS section for additional precautions.

Dialysis

Data not available

Other Comments

Administration advice:
-For external use only.
-Avoid use in or around the eyes.

Storage requirements:
-Protect from freezing.

General:
-May produce false-positive ferric chloride test results for phenylketonuria (PKU) if iodochlorhydroxyquin is present in the neonate's diaper or urine.
-Pediatric therapy continuing for longer than 2 weeks and consisting of doses in excess of 2 applications per day (with low-potency corticosteroids) should be carefully evaluated by the physician; especially important if the medication is applied to more than 5% to 10% of the body surface or if an occlusive dressing is used.
-A tight-fitting diaper or one covered with plastic pants may constitute an occlusive dressing.

Monitoring:
-Endocrine: Urinary free cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation tests may be helpful in evaluating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression.

Patient advice:
-Report any signs of local adverse reactions especially under occlusive dressing.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

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