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Rufinamide Disease Interactions

There are 4 disease interactions with rufinamide:

Major

Anticonvulsants (Includes Rufinamide) ↔ Depression

Severe Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Depression

Antiepileptic drugs can increase depression and suicidal thoughts or behaviors in patients receiving these drugs for any indication. Patients should be monitored for the emergence or worsening of depression, suicidal thoughts and unusual changes in mood or behavior. Caregivers and family should be alert for the emergence or worsening of symptoms. Behaviors of concern should be reported immediately to the healthcare providers.

Major

Anticonvulsants (Includes Rufinamide) ↔ Liver Disease

Severe Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Liver Disease

Most anticonvulsants are primarily metabolized by the liver. Metabolic activity may be decreased in patients with liver disease, resulting in elevated drug levels and increased risk of toxicity. Therapy with anticonvulsants should be administered cautiously in patients with mild and moderate liver impairment. Therapy with these drugs is mostly not recommended in patients with severe liver impairment. Caution is also advised when treating patients with a history of liver disease, since the use of some anticonvulsants has been associated with hepatotoxicity. Baseline and periodic evaluation of liver function is recommended. Therapy should be discontinued and not readministered if evidence of liver damage is observed and felt to be drug-related.

References

  1. Ponte CD "Carbamazepine-induced thrombocytopenia, rash, and hepatic dysfunction." Drug Intell Clin Pharm 17 (1983): 642-4
  2. Horowitz S, Patwardhan R, Marcus E "Hepatotoxic reactions associated with carbamazepine therapy." Epilepsia 29 (1988): 149-54
  3. "Product Information. Tegretol (carbamazepine)." Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, NJ.
  4. Sumi M, Watari N, Umezawa O, Kaneniwa N "Pharmacokinetic study of carbamazepine and its epoxide metabolite in humans." J Pharmacobiodyn 10 (1987): 652-61
  5. Swinburn BA, Croxson MS, Miller MV, Crawford KB "Carbamazepine induced granulomatous hepatitis." N Z Med J Mar (1986): 167
  6. Laspina I, Secchi P, Grampa G, Uccellini D, Porazzi D "Acute cholangitis induced by carbamazepine." Epilepsia 35 (1994): 1029-31
  7. Levy M, Goodman MW, Van Dyne BJ, Sumner HW "Granulomatous hepatitis secondary to carbamazepine." Ann Intern Med 95 (1981): 64-5
  8. Levy RH, Pitlick WH, Troupin AS, et al "Pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine in normal man." Clin Pharmacol Ther 17 (1975): 657-68
  9. Pellock JM "Carbamazepine side effects in children and adults." Epilepsia 28 (1987): s64-70
  10. Eadie MJ "Formation of active metabolites of anticonvulsant drugs: a review of their pharmacokinetic and therapeutic significance." Clin Pharmacokinet 21 (1991): 27-41
  11. Vree TB, Janssen TJ, Hekster YA, et al "Clinical pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine and its epoxy and hydroxy metabolites in humans after an overdose." Ther Drug Monit 8 (1986): 297-304
  12. Tomson T, Tybring G, Bertilsson L "Single-dose kinetics and metabolism of carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide." Clin Pharmacol Ther 33 (1983): 58-65
  13. Cotter LM, Eadie MJ, Hooper WD, et al "The pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine." Eur J Clin Pharmacol 12 (1977): 451-6
  14. Gerardin AP, Abadie FV, Campestrini JA, Theobald W "Pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine in normal humans after single and repeated oral doses." J Pharmacokinet Biopharm 4 (1976): 521-35
  15. Eichelbaum M, Ekbom K, Bertilsson L, et al "Plasma kinetics of carbamazepine and its epoxide metabolite in man after single and multiple doses." Eur J Clin Pharmacol 8 (1975): 337-41
  16. Rawlins MD, Collste P, Bertilsson L, Palmer L "Distribution and elimination kinetics of carbamazepine in man." Eur J Clin Pharmacol 8 (1975): 91-6
  17. Westenberg HG, van der Kleihn E, Oei TT, de Zeeuw RA "Kinetics of carbamazepine and carbamazepine-epoxide, determined by use of plasma and saliva." Clin Pharmacol Ther 23 (1978): 320-8
  18. Larrey D, Hadengue A, Pessayre D, et al "Carbamazepine-induced acute cholangitis." Dig Dis Sci 32 (1987): 554-7
  19. Hopen G, Nesthus I, Laerum OD "Fatal carbamazepine-associated hepatitis." Acta Med Scand 210 (1981): 333-5
  20. Eichelbaum M, Kothe KW, Hoffmann F, von Unruh GE "Kinetics and metabolism of carbamazepine during combined antiepileptic drug therapy." Clin Pharmacol Ther 26 (1979): 366-71
  21. Levander HG "Granulomatous hepatitis in a patient receiving carbamazepine." Acta Med Scand 208 (1980): 333-5
  22. Soffer EE, Taylor RJ, Bertram PD, et al "Carbamazepine-induced liver injury." South Med J 76 (1983): 681-3
View all 22 references
Major

Anticonvulsants (Includes Rufinamide) ↔ Renal Dysfunction

Severe Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Renal Dysfunction

Most anticonvulsants are primarily excreted by the kidney. The plasma clearance may be decreased and the half-life prolonged in patients with impaired renal function. Therapy with anticonvulsants should be administered cautiously in patients with significant renal dysfunction. In most cases it is recommended to adjust the dosage in patients with CrCl <50 mL/min to half the usual starting dose and then increase slowly to achieve the desired clinical response. The renal function should be monitored regularly in patients receiving therapy.

References

  1. "Product Information. Trileptal (oxcarbazepine)" Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, NJ.
Major

Rufinamide (Includes Rufinamide) ↔ Short Qt Syndrome

Severe Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Short QT Syndrome

Rufinamide can cause shortening of the QT interval. Its use is contraindicated in patients with Familial Short QT syndrome as this condition is associated with increased risk of sudden death and ventricular arrhythmias, particularly ventricular fibrillation.

rufinamide drug Interactions

There are 835 drug interactions with rufinamide

rufinamide alcohol/food Interactions

There is 1 alcohol/food interaction with rufinamide

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No information available.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

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