Skip to main content

Alora (Transdermal)

Generic name: estradioles-tra-DYE-ol ]
Brand names: Alora, Climara, Divigel, Elestrin, Esclim, ... show all 13 brands
Drug class: Estrogens

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Feb 17, 2023.

Transdermal route(Gel/Jelly)

Endometrial Cancer, Cardiovascular Disorders, Probable Dementia, and Breast Cancer

Estrogen-Alone Therapy

Endometrial Cancer - There is an increased risk of cancer in a woman with a uterus who uses unopposed estrogens. Adding a progestogen to estrogen therapy has been shown to reduce the risk of endometrial hyperplasia, which may be a precursor to endometrial cancer. Perform adequate diagnostic measures, including directed or random endometrial sampling when indicated, to rule out malignancy in postmenopausal women with undiagnosed persistent or recurring abnormal genital bleeding.

Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) estrogen-alone substudy reported increased risks of stroke and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in postmenopausal women (50 to 79 years of age) during 7.1 years of treatment with daily oral conjugated estrogens (CE) [0.625 mg]-alone, relative to placebo.

Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - Do not use estrogen-alone therapy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease or dementia.

Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - Only daily oral 0.625 mg CE was studied in the estrogen-alone substudy of the WHI. Therefore, the relevance of the WHI findings regarding adverse cardiovascular events and dementia to lower CE doses, other routes of administration, or other estrogen-alone products is not known. Without such data, it is not possible to definitively exclude these risks or determine the extent of these risks for other products. Discuss with your patient the benefits and risks of estrogen-alone therapy, taking into account her individual risk profile.

Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - Prescribe estrogens with or without progestogens at the lowest effective doses and for the shortest duration consistent with treatment goals and risks for the individual woman.

Estrogen Plus Progestin Therapy

Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - The WHI estrogen plus progestin substudy reported increased risks of DVT, pulmonary embolism (PE), stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) in postmenopausal women (50 to 79 years of age) during 5.6 years of treatment with daily oral CE (0.625 mg) combined with combined medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) [2.5 mg], relative to placebo.

Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - The WHIMS estrogen plus progestin ancillary study of the WHI reported an increased risk of developing probable dementia in postmenopausal women 65 years of age or older during 4 years of treatment with daily CE (0.625 mg) combined with MPA (2.5 mg), relative to placebo. It is unknown whether this finding applies to younger postmenopausal women.

Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - Do not use estrogen plus progestogen therapy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease or dementia.

Breast Cancer - The WHI estrogen plus progestin substudy also demonstrated an increased risk of invasive breast cancer.

Breast Cancer - Only daily oral 0.625 mg CE and 2.5 mg MPA were studied in the estrogen plus progestin substudy of the WHI. Therefore, the relevance of the WHI findings regarding adverse cardiovascular events, dementia, and breast cancer to lower CE plus other MPA doses, other routes of administration, or other estrogen plus progestogen products is not known. Without such data, it is not possible to definitively exclude these risks or determine the extent of these risks for other products. Discuss with your patient the benefits and risks of estrogen plus progestogen therapy, taking into account her individual risk profile.

Breast Cancer - Prescribe estrogens with or without progestogen at the lowest effective doses and for the shortest duration consistent with treatment goals and risks for the individual woman .

Transdermal route(Patch, Extended Release;Gel/Jelly)

Estrogen Alone Therapy

Endometrial Cancer - There is an increased risk of cancer in a woman with a uterus who uses unopposed estrogens. Adding a progestin to estrogen therapy has been shown to reduce the risk of endometrial hyperplasia, which may be a precursor to endometrial cancer. Adequate diagnostic measures, including directed or random endometrial sampling when indicated, should be undertaken to rule out malignancy in postmenopausal women with undiagnosed persistent or recurring abnormal genital bleeding Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - Estrogen-alone therapy should not be used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease or dementia .Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) estrogen-alone substudy reported increased risks of stroke and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in postmenopausal women (50 to 79 years of age) during 7.1 years of treatment with daily oral conjugated estrogens (CE) [0.625 mg]-alone, relative to placebo .Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - The WHI Memory Study (WHIMS) estrogen-alone ancillary study of WHI reported an increased risk of developing probable dementia in postmenopausal women 65 years of age or older during 5.2 years of treatment with daily CE (0.625 mg)-alone, relative to placebo. It is unknown whether this finding applies to younger postmenopausal women .Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - In the absence of comparable data, these risks should be assumed to be similar for other doses of CE and other dosage forms of estrogens .Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - Only daily oral 0.625 mg CE was studied in the estrogen -alone substudy of the WHI. Therefore, thee relevance of the WHI findings regarding adverse cardiovascular events and dementia to lower CE doses, other routes of administration, or other estrogen-alone products is not known. Without such data, it is not possible to definitively exclude these risks or determine the extent of these risks for other products. Discuss with your patient the benefits and risks of estrogen-alone therapy, taking into account her individual risk profile .Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - Estrogens with or without progestins should be prescribed at the lowest effective doses and for the shortest duration consistent with treatment goals and risks for the individual woman .Estrogen Plus Progestin Therapy

Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - Estrogen plus progestin therapy should not be used for the prevention of cardiovascular disease or dementia .Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - The WHI estrogen plus progestin substudy reported increased risks of DVT, pulmonary embolism (PE), stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) in postmenopausal women (50 to 79 years of age) during 5.6 years of treatment with daily oral CE (0.625 mg) combined with combined medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) [2.5 mg], relative to placebo .Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - The WHIMS estrogen plus progestin ancillary study of the WHI reported an increased risk of developing probable dementia in postmenopausal women 65 years of age and older during 4 years of treatment with daily CE (0.625 mg) combined with MPA (2.5 mg), relative to placebo. It is unknown whether this finding applies to younger postmenopausal women .Breast Cancer - The WHI estrogen plus progestin substudy also demonstrated an increased risk of invasive breast cancer .Breast Cancer - In the absence of comparable data, these risks should be assumed to be similar for other doses of CE and MPA, and other combinations and dosage forms of estrogens and progestins .Breast Cancer - Only daily oral 0.625 mg CE and 2.5 mg MPA were studied in the estrogen plus progestin substudy of the WHI. Therefore, the relevance of the WHI findings regarding adverse cardiovascular events, dementia, and breast cancer to lower CE plus other MPA doses, other routes of administration, or other estrogen plus progestogen products is not known. Without such data, it is not possible to definitively exclude these risks or determine the extent of these risks for other products. Discuss with your patient the benefits and risks of estrogen plus progestogen therapy, taking into account her individual risk profile .Breast Cancer - Estrogens with or without progestins should be prescribed at the lowest effective doses and for the shortest duration consistent with treatment goals and risks for the individual woman .

Transdermal route(Spray)

Estrogen Alone Therapy

Endometrial Cancer - There is an increased risk of endometrial cancer in a woman with a uterus who uses unopposed estrogens. Adding a progestogen to estrogen therapy has been shown to reduce the risk of endometrial hyperplasia, which may be a precursor to endometrial cancer. Perform adequate diagnostic measures, including directed and random endometrial sampling when indicated, should be undertaken to rule out malignancy in all cases of undiagnosed persistent or recurring abnormal genital bleeding.

Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) estrogen-alone substudy reported increased risks of stroke and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in postmenopausal women (50 to 79 years of age) during 7.1 years of treatment with daily oral conjugated estrogens (CE) [0.625 mg] alone, relative to placebo.

Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - The WHI Memory Study (WHIMS) estrogen-alone ancillary study of WHI reported an increased risk of developing probable dementia in postmenopausal women 65 years of age and older during 5.2 years of treatment with daily CE (0.625 mg)-alone, relative to placebo. It is unknown whether this finding applies to younger postmenopausal women.

Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - Do not use estrogen-alone therapy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease or dementia.

Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - Only daily oral 0.625 mg CE was studied in the estrogen-alone substudy of the WHI. Therefore, the relevance of the WHI findings regarding adverse cardiovascular events and dementia to lower CE doses, other routes of administration, or other estrogen-alone products is not known. Without such data, it is not possible to definitively exclude these risks or determine the extent of these risks for other products. Discuss with your patient the benefits and risks of estrogen-alone therapy, taking into account her individual risk profile.

Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - Prescribe estrogens with or without progestogen should be prescribed at the lowest effective doses and for the shortest duration consistent with treatment goals and risks for the individual woman.

Estrogen Plus Progestin Therapy

Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - The WHI estrogen plus progestin substudy reported increased risks of pulmonary embolism (PE), DVT, stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) in postmenopausal women (50 to 79 years of age) during 5.6 years of treatment with daily oral CE (0.625 mg) combined with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) [2.5 mg], relative to placebo.

Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - The WHIMS estrogen plus progestin ancillary study of the WHI reported an increased risk of developing probable dementia in postmenopausal women 65 years of age and older during 4 years of treatment with daily CE (0.625 mg) combined with MPA (2.5 mg), relative to placebo. It is unknown whether this finding applies to younger postmenopausal women.

Cardiovascular Disorders and Probable Dementia - Do not use estrogen plus progestogen therapy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease or dementia.

Breast Cancer - The WHI estrogen plus progestin substudy also demonstrated an increased risk of invasive breast cancer.

Breast Cancer - Only daily oral 0.625 mg CE and 2.5 mg MPA were studied in the estrogen plus progestogen substudy of the WHI. Therefore, the relevance of the WHI findings regarding adverse cardiovascular events, dementia and breast cancer to lower CE plus other MPA doses, other routes of administration, or other estrogen plus progestogen products is not known. Without such data, it is not possible to definitively exclude these risks or determine the extent of these risks for other products. Discuss with your patient the benefits and risks of estrogen plus progestogen therapy, taking into account her individual risk profile.

Breast Cancer - Prescribe estrogens with or without progestogen should be prescribed at the lowest effective doses and for the shortest duration consistent with treatment goals and risks for the individual woman.

Unintentional Secondary Exposure

Breast budding and breast masses in prepubertal females and gynecomastia and breast masses in prepubertal males have been reported following unintentional secondary exposure to estradiol transdermal spray by women using this product. In most cases, the condition resolved with the removal of the estradiol transdermal spray exposure. Women should ensure that children should not come in contact with the site(s) where estradiol transdermal spray is applied. Healthcare providers should advise patients to strictly adhere to recommended instructions for use .

Uses for Alora

Estradiol transdermal gel, patch, and spray are used to treat moderate to severe symptoms of menopause (eg, feelings of warmth in the face, neck, and chest, or sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating [hot flashes]) in women with a uterus. It is also used to treat changes in and around the vagina (eg, vaginal dryness, itching, and burning) caused by low estrogen levels or menopause. This medicine is also used to treat certain conditions in women before menopause if their ovaries do not make enough estrogens naturally, and prevent osteoporosis after menopause.

Estradiol is an estrogen hormone. The hormone from the patch, gel, and spray is absorbed through your skin into your body.

This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription.

Before using Alora

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered:

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Use of estradiol transdermal patch, gel, and spray is not indicated in the pediatric population. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Geriatric

Although appropriate studies on the relationship of age to the effects of estradiol transdermal patch, gel, and spray have not been performed in the geriatric population, no geriatric-specific problems have been documented to date. However, elderly patients are more likely to have breast cancer, stroke, or dementia, which may require caution in patients receiving estradiol transdermal patch, gel and spray.

Breast Feeding

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Interactions with Medicines

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

Interactions with Food/Tobacco/Alcohol

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following may cause an increased risk of certain side effects but may be unavoidable in some cases. If used together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use this medicine, or give you special instructions about the use of food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

Proper use of Alora

It is very important that you use this medicine only as directed by your doctor. Do not use more of it, do not use it more often, and do not use it for a longer time than your doctor ordered. To do so may cause unwanted side effects.

This medicine is for use on the skin only. Do not get it in your eyes, nose, mouth, breast, or vagina. Do not use it on skin areas that have cuts, scrapes, or burns. If it does get on these areas, rinse it off right away with water.

This medicine comes with a patient information insert and patients instructions. Read and follow the instructions in the insert carefully. Ask your doctor if you have any questions.

Wash your hands with soap and water before and after using this medicine.

To use the patch:

To use the spray:

To use the gel:

The gel and spray contain alcohol and are flammable. Avoid using it near an open flame or while smoking.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

Missed Dose

If you forget to wear or change a patch, put one on as soon as you can. If it is almost time to put on your next patch, wait until then to apply a new patch and skip the one you missed. Do not apply extra patches to make up for a missed dose.

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Do not use Evamist® spray if it has been more than 12 hours since you missed your last dose.

Storage

Store the patches at room temperature in a closed container, away from heat, moisture, and direct light.

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Keep out of the reach of children.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Ask your healthcare professional how you should dispose of any medicine you do not use.

Precautions while using Alora

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure this medicine is working properly and does not cause unwanted effects. These visits may be every 3 to 6 months. Pelvic exam, breast exam, and mammogram (breast x-ray) may be needed to check for unwanted effects, unless your doctor tells you otherwise. Be sure to keep all appointments.

It is unlikely that a postmenopausal woman may become pregnant. But, you should know that using this medicine while you are pregnant could harm your unborn baby. If you think you have become pregnant while using the medicine, tell your doctor right away.

Using this medicine may increase your risk for having blood clots, strokes, or heart attacks. This risk may continue even after you stop using the medicine. Your risk for these serious problems is even greater if you have high blood pressure, high cholesterol in your blood, diabetes, or if you are overweight or smoke cigarettes. Contact your doctor immediately if you experience confusion, difficulty speaking, double vision, headaches, an inability to move arms, legs or facial muscle, or an inability to speak.

Using this medicine over a long period of time may increase your risk of breast cancer, endometrial cancer, or uterine cancer. Do not use this medicine if you have had your uterus (womb) removed (hysterectomy). Check with your doctor immediately if you experience abnormal vaginal bleeding.

Using this medicine may increase your risk of dementia, especially in women 65 years of age and older.

Using this medicine may increase your risk for gallbladder disease. Talk with your doctor about this risk.

Tell the medical doctor or dentist in charge that you are using this medicine before any kind of surgery (including dental surgery) or emergency treatment. Your doctor will decide whether you should continue using this medicine. This medicine may also affect the results of certain medical tests.

Check with your doctor immediately if severe headache or sudden loss of vision or any other change in vision occurs while you are using this medicine. Your doctor may want you to have your eyes checked by an ophthalmologist (eye doctor).

This medicine may cause a serious type of allergic reaction, including anaphylaxis, which can be life-threatening and requires immediate medical attention. Call your doctor right away if you have a rash, itching, hoarseness, trouble breathing, trouble swallowing, or any swelling of your hands, face, or mouth while you are using this medicine.

Check with your child's doctor right away if your child starts to have nipple or breast swelling or tenderness in females, or enlargement of the breasts in males. Your child may have been exposed to this medicine.

Do not allow your pets to lick or touch the arm where this medicine was applied. Small pets may be sensitive to this medicine. Call your pet's veterinarian if your pet starts to have nipple or breast enlargement, swelling of the vulva, or any signs of illness.

Do not take other medicines or drink grapefruit juice unless you discuss it with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter [OTC]) medicines and herbal (eg, St. John's wort) or vitamin supplements.

Side Effects of Alora

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Incidence not known

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Less common

Incidence not known

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Commonly used brand name(s)

In the U.S.

In Canada

Available Dosage Forms:

Therapeutic Class: Endocrine-Metabolic Agent

Pharmacologic Class: Estrogen

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.