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Meningococcal group B vaccine Side Effects

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Feb 15, 2021.

For the Consumer

Applies to meningococcal group B vaccine: intramuscular suspension

Warning

You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Keep track of all side effects you have. If you need a booster dose, you will need to tell the vaccination provider if the previous shot caused any side effects.

You should not receive a booster vaccine if you had a life-threatening allergic reaction after the first shot.

Becoming infected with meningococcal disease and developing meningitis is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. Any vaccine may cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is low.

You may feel faint after receiving this vaccine. Some people have had seizure-like reactions after receiving this vaccine. Your doctor may want you to remain under observation during the first 15 minutes after the injection.

Common side effects may include:

  • headache;

  • feeling tired;

  • muscle or joint pain;

  • nausea, diarrhea; or

  • pain, redness, swelling, or a hard lump where the shot was given.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to meningococcal group B vaccine: intramuscular suspension

General

The most common adverse events were pain at the injection site, fatigue, erythema, myalgia, headache, and induration.[Ref]

Local

Very common (10% or more): Injection site pain (92.8%), erythema (50%), induration (32%), swelling (21.6%)

Postmarketing reports: Blisters at or around injection site[Ref]

Nervous system

Very common (10% or more): Fatigue (64.4%), headache (56.9%), sleepiness, unusual crying

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Seizures (including febrile seizures)

Postmarketing reports: Syncope, vasovagal responses to injection[Ref]

Musculoskeletal

Very common (10% or more): Myalgia (49%), chills (30.3%), arthralgia (21.6%)[Ref]

Gastrointestinal

Very common (10% or more): Nausea (19%), diarrhea (15.2%)

Common (1% to 10%): Vomiting[Ref]

Psychiatric

Very common (10% or more): Irritability[Ref]

Metabolic

Very common (10% or more): Eating disorders[Ref]

Other

Common (1% to 10%): Fever[Ref]

Dermatologic

Common (1% to 10%): Rash

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Eczema

Rare (less than 0.1%): Urticaria[Ref]

Cardiovascular

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Pallor (rare after booster)

Rare (less than 0.1%): Kawasaki syndrome[Ref]

Hypersensitivity

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Anaphylaxis

Postmarketing reports: Allergic reactions, rash, eye swelling[Ref]

Respiratory

Frequency not reported: Nasopharyngitis[Ref]

References

1. "Product Information. Trumenba (meningococcal group B vaccine)." Pfizer U.S. Pharmaceuticals Group, New York, NY.

2. "Product Information. Bexsero (meningococcal group B vaccine)." Novartis Vaccines & Diagnostics Inc, Cambridge, MA.

3. Cerner Multum, Inc. "UK Summary of Product Characteristics." O 0

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Some side effects may not be reported. You may report them to the FDA.