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Bromfenac ophthalmic Disease Interactions

There is 1 disease interaction with bromfenac ophthalmic:

Major

Nsaids (Includes Bromfenac ophthalmic) ↔ Asthma

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Asthma

Approximately 10% of patients with asthma may have aspirin-sensitive asthma, characterized by nasal polyposis, pansinusitis, eosinophilia, and precipitation of asthma and rhinitis attacks after ingestion of aspirin. The use of aspirin in these patients has been associated with severe bronchospasm and fatal anaphylactoid reactions. Since cross-sensitivity has been noted between aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), therapy with any NSAID should be avoided in asthmatic patients with a history of aspirin or other NSAID sensitivity, and administered cautiously in all patients with preexisting asthma. Prior to initiating therapy with NSAIDs, patients should be questioned about previous allergic-type reactions to these agents. Salicylate salts, salsalate, salicylamide, and acetaminophen may be appropriate alternatives in patients with a history of NSAID-induced bronchospasm, since cross-sensitivity to these agents appears to be low. However, cross-sensitivity has been demonstrated occasionally with high dosages of these agents (e.g., acetaminophen >= 1000 mg), thus it may be appropriate to initiate therapy with low dosages and increase gradually. There is some evidence suggesting that COX-2 inhibitors may be safely used in patients with aspirin-sensitive asthma, although the labeling for these products contraindicate such use. If necessary, aspirin desensitization may also be attempted in some patients under medical surveillance.

References

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  2. "Product Information. Naprosyn (naproxen)." Syntex Laboratories Inc, Palo Alto, CA.
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  4. Stevenson DD, Simon RA "Lack of cross-reactivity between rofecoxib and aspirin in aspirin-sensitive patients with asthma." J Allerg Clin Immunol 108 (2001): 47-51
  5. "Product Information. Voltaren (diclofenac)." Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, NJ.
  6. Lewis RV "Severe asthma after naproxen." Lancet 05/30/87 (1987): 1270
  7. "Product Information. Feldene (piroxicam)." Pfizer US Pharmaceuticals, New York, NY.
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  9. "Product Information. Clinoril (sulindac)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  10. Settipane RA, Stevenson DD "Cross sensitivity with acetaminophen in aspirin-sensitive subjects with asthma." J Allergy Clin Immunol 84 (1989): 26-33
  11. "Product Information. Mobic (meloxicam)" Boehringer-Ingelheim, Ridgefield, CT.
  12. "Product Information. Ansaid (flurbiprofen)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  13. Carmona MJ, Blanca M, Garcia A, Fernandez S, Burgos F, Miranda A, Vega JM, Garcia J "Intolerance to piroxicam in patients with adverse reactions to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs." J Allergy Clin Immunol 90 (1992): 873-9
  14. "Product Information. Vioxx (rofecoxib)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  15. Israel E, Fischer AR, Rosenberg MA, Lilly CM, Callery JC, Shapiro J, Cohn J, Rubin P, Drazen JM "The pivotal role of 5-lipoxygenase products in the reaction of aspirin-sensitive asthmatics to aspirin." Am Rev Respir Dis 148 (1993): 1447-51
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  19. "Product Information. Bextra (valdecoxib)." Pharmacia Corporation, Peapack, NJ.
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  24. Lee TH "Mechanism of bronchospasm in aspirin-sensitive asthma." Am Rev Respir Dis 148 (1993): 1442-3
  25. "Product Information. Daypro (oxaprozin)." Searle, Skokie, IL.
  26. Shapiro N "Acute angioedema after ketorolac ingestion - report of case." J Oral Maxillofac Surg 52 (1994): 626-7
  27. Lee TH "Mechanism of aspirin sensitivity." Am Rev Respir Dis 145 (1992): s34-6
  28. "Product Information. Celebrex (celecoxib)." Searle, Chicago, IL.
  29. Salberg DJ, Simon MR "Severe asthma induced by naproxen: a case report and review of the literature." Ann Allergy 45 (1980): 372-5
  30. Dahlen B, Szczeklik A, Murray HH "Celecoxib in patients with asthma and aspirin intolerance." N Engl J Med 344 (2000): 142
  31. "Product Information. Indocin (indomethacin)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  32. "Product Information. Tolectin (tolmetin)." McNeil Pharmaceutical, Raritan, NJ.
  33. "Product Information. Relafen (nabumetone)." SmithKline Beecham, Philadelphia, PA.
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  35. "Product Information. Orudis (ketoprofen)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  36. "Product Information. Nalfon (fenoprofen)." Xspire Pharma, Ridgeland, MS.
  37. Woessner KM, Simon RA, Stevenson DD "The safety of celecoxib in patients with aspirin-sensitive asthma." Arthritis Rheum 46 (2002): 2201-6
  38. "Product Information. Lodine (etodolac)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
View all 38 references

bromfenac ophthalmic drug Interactions

There are 117 drug interactions with bromfenac ophthalmic

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No information available.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

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