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Aceta-Gesic (acetaminophen / diphenhydramine) Disease Interactions

There are 11 disease interactions with Aceta-Gesic (acetaminophen / diphenhydramine):

Major

Acetaminophen (Includes Aceta-Gesic) ↔ Alcoholism

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Alcoholism

Chronic alcohol abusers may be at increased risk of hepatotoxicity during treatment with acetaminophen (APAP). Severe liver injury, including cases of acute liver failure resulting in liver transplant and death, has been reported in patients using acetaminophen. Therapy with acetaminophen should be administered cautiously, if at all, in patients who consume three or more alcoholic drinks a day. In general, patients should avoid drinking alcohol while taking acetaminophen-containing medications. Patients should be warned not to exceed the maximum recommended total daily dosage of acetaminophen (4 g/day in adults and children 12 years of age or older), and to read all prescription and over-the-counter medication labels to ensure they are not taking multiple acetaminophen-containing products, or check with a healthcare professional if they are unsure. They should also be advised to seek medical attention if they experience signs and symptoms of liver injury such as fever, rash, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, right upper quadrant pain, dark urine, and jaundice.

References

  1. Whitcomb DC, Block GD "Association of acetaminopphen hepatotoxicity with fasting and ethanol use." JAMA 272 (1994): 1845-50
  2. Bonkovsky HL "Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, fasting, and ethanol." JAMA 274 (1995): 301
  3. Kaysen GA, Pond SM, Roper MH, Menke DJ, Marrama MA "Combined hepatic and renal injury in alcoholics during therapeutic use of acetaminophen." Arch Intern Med 145 (1985): 2019-23
  4. O'Dell JR, Zetterman RK, Burnett DA "Centrilobular hepatic fibrosis following acetaminophen-induced hepatic necrosis in an alcoholic." JAMA 255 (1986): 2636-7
  5. Kartsonis A, Reddy KR, Schiff ER "Alcohol, acetaminophen, and hepatic necrosis." Ann Intern Med 105 (1986): 138-9
  6. Zimmerman HJ, Maddrey WC "Acetaminophen (paracetamol) hepatotoxicity with regular intake of alcohol: analysis of instances of therapeutic misadventure." Hepatology 22 (1995): 767-73
  7. "Product Information. Tylenol (acetaminophen)." McNeil Pharmaceutical, Raritan, NJ.
  8. Nelson EB, Temple AR "Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, fasting, and ethanol." JAMA 274 (1995): 301
  9. McClain CJ, Kromhout JP, Peterson FJ, Holtzman JL "Potentiation of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by alcohol." JAMA 244 (1980): 251-3
  10. Seeff LB, Cuccherini BA, Zimmerman HJ, Adler E, Benjamin SB "Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in alcoholics." Ann Intern Med 104 (1986): 399-404
  11. Prescott LF, Critchley JA "Drug interactions affecting analgesic toxicity." Am J Med 75 (1983): 113-6
View all 11 references
Major

Acetaminophen (Includes Aceta-Gesic) ↔ Liver Disease

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Liver Disease

Acetaminophen is primarily metabolized in the liver to inactive forms. However, small quantities are converted by minor pathways to metabolites that can cause hepatotoxicity or methemoglobinemia. Patients with hepatic impairment may be at increased risk of toxicity due to increased minor metabolic pathway activity. Likewise, chronic or overuse of acetaminophen can saturate the primary hepatic enzymes and lead to increased metabolism by minor pathways. Severe liver injury, including cases of acute liver failure resulting in liver transplant and death, has been reported in patients using acetaminophen. Therapy with acetaminophen should be administered cautiously in patients with hepatic insufficiency. Clinical monitoring of hepatic function is recommended. Instruct patients to avoid drinking alcohol while taking acetaminophen-containing medications. Patients should be warned not to exceed the maximum recommended total daily dosage of acetaminophen (4 g/day in adults and children 12 years of age or older), and to read all prescription and over-the-counter medication labels to ensure they are not taking multiple acetaminophen-containing products, or check with a healthcare professional if they are unsure.

References

  1. Gillette JR "An integrated approach to the study of chemically reactive metabolites of acetaminophen." Arch Intern Med 141 (1981): 375-9
  2. "Product Information. Tylenol (acetaminophen)." McNeil Pharmaceutical, Raritan, NJ.
  3. Arnman R, Olsson R "Elimination of paracetamol in chronic liver disease." Acta Hepatogastroenterol (Stuttg) 25 (1978): 283-6
  4. Clements JA, Critchley JA, Prescott LF "The role of sulphate conjugation in the metabolism and disposition of oral and intravenous paracetamol in man." Br J Clin Pharmacol 18 (1984): 481-5
  5. Forrest JA, Adriaenssens P, Finlayson ND, Prescott LF "Paracetamol metabolism in chronic liver disease." Eur J Clin Pharmacol 15 (1979): 427-31
  6. Venkataramanan R, Kalp K, Rabinovitch M, et al "Conjugative drug metabolism in liver transplant patients." Transplant Proc 21 (1989): 2455
View all 6 references
Major

Antihistamines (Includes Aceta-Gesic) ↔ Anticholinergic Effects

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Gastrointestinal Obstruction, Urinary Retention, Glaucoma/Intraocular Hypertension

Antihistamines often have anticholinergic activity, to which elderly patients are particularly sensitive. Therapy with antihistamines should be administered cautiously, if at all, in patients with preexisting conditions that are likely to be exacerbated by anticholinergic activity, such as urinary retention or obstruction; angle-closure glaucoma, untreated intraocular hypertension, or uncontrolled primary open-angle glaucoma; and gastrointestinal obstructive disorders. Conventional, first-generation antihistamines such as the ethanolamines (bromodiphenhydramine, carbinoxamine, clemastine, dimenhydrinate, diphenhydramine, doxylamine, phenyltoloxamine) tend to exhibit substantial anticholinergic effects. In contrast, the newer, relatively nonsedating antihistamines (e.g., cetirizine, fexofenadine, loratadine) reportedly have low to minimal anticholinergic activity at normally recommended dosages and may be appropriate alternatives.

References

  1. "Product Information. Periactin (cyproheptadine)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  2. "Product Information. Tavist (clemastine)." Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ.
  3. "Product Information. Optimine (azatadine)." Schering Laboratories, Kenilworth, NJ.
  4. "Product Information. Marezine (cyclizine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  5. "Product Information. Temaril (trimeprazine)" Allergan Inc, Irvine, CA.
  6. "Product Information. Drixoral (dextromethorphan)." Schering-Plough, Liberty Corner, NJ.
  7. "Product Information. Semprex-D (acrivastine-pseudoephedrine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  8. "Product Information. Benadryl (diphenhydramine)." Parke-Davis, Morris Plains, NJ.
  9. "Product Information. Zyrtec (cetirizine)." Pfizer US Pharmaceuticals, New York, NY.
  10. "Product Information. Dramamine (dimenhydrinate)" Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  11. Watemberg NM, Roth KS, Alehan FK, Epstein CE "Central anticholinergic syndrome on therapeutic doses of cyproheptadine." Pediatrics 103 (1999): 158-60
  12. "Product Information. Phenergan (promethazine)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  13. "Product Information. Dimetane (brompheniramine)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  14. "Product Information. Chlortrimeton (chlorpheniramine)." Schering-Plough, Liberty Corner, NJ.
  15. "Product Information. Tacaryl (methdilazine)." Westwood Squibb Pharmaceutical Corporation, Buffalo, NY.
  16. Schuller DE, Turkewitz D "Adverse effects of antihistamines." Postgrad Med 79 (1986): 75-86
  17. "Product Information. Vistaril (hydroxyzine)." Pfizer US Pharmaceuticals, New York, NY.
  18. "Product Information. Poly-Histine-D (pyrilamine)." Bock Pharmaceutical Company, St. Louis, MO.
  19. DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC, Matzke GR, Wells BG, Posey LM "Pharmacotherapy: A Pathophysiologic Approach 4th" Stamford, CT: Appleton & Lange (1999):
  20. "Product Information. Antivert (meclizine)." Roerig Division, New York, NY.
View all 20 references
Major

Anxiolytics/Sedatives/Hypnotics (Includes Aceta-Gesic) ↔ Depression

Severe Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Depression

A variety of abnormal thinking and behavior changes have been reported to occur in association with the use of most anxiolytics, sedatives and hypnotics. Some of these changes include decreased inhibition, aggressiveness, agitation, and hallucinations. These drugs can cause or exacerbate mental depression and cause suicidal behavior and ideation. Therapy with these drugs should be administered cautiously in patients with a history of depression or other psychiatric disorders. Patients should be monitored for any changes in mood or behavior. It may be prudent to refrain from dispensing large quantities of medication to these patients.

References

  1. "Product Information. Ambien (zolpidem)." sanofi-aventis, Bridgewater, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Sonata (zaleplon)" Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  3. "Product Information. Placidyl (ethchlorvynol)." Abbott Pharmaceutical, Abbott Park, IL.
  4. "Product Information. Equanil (meprobamate)." Wallace Laboratories, Cranbury, NJ.
  5. "Product Information. Aquachloral Supprettes (chloral hydrate)." Medisca, Plattsburg, NY.
View all 5 references
Moderate

Acetaminophen (Includes Aceta-Gesic) ↔ Pku

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Phenylketonuria

Several oral acetaminophen and acetaminophen-combination products, particularly flavored chewable tablets, contain the artificial sweetener, aspartame (NutraSweet). Aspartame is converted to phenylalanine in the gastrointestinal tract following ingestion. Chewable and effervescent formulations of acetaminophen products may also contain phenylalanine. The aspartame/phenylalanine content should be considered when these products are used in patients who must restrict their intake of phenylalanine (i.e. phenylketonurics).

References

  1. "Product Information. Tylenol (acetaminophen)." McNeil Pharmaceutical, Raritan, NJ.
Moderate

Antihistamines (Includes Aceta-Gesic) ↔ Asthma/Copd

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Asthma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

It has been suggested that the anticholinergic effect of antihistamines may reduce the volume and cause thickening of bronchial secretions, resulting in obstruction of respiratory tract. Some manufacturers and clinicians recommend that therapy with antihistamines be administered cautiously in patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

References

  1. "Product Information. Temaril (trimeprazine)" Allergan Inc, Irvine, CA.
  2. "Product Information. Tavist (clemastine)." Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ.
  3. "Product Information. Periactin (cyproheptadine)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  4. Maddox DE, Reed CE "Clinical pharmacodynamics of antihistamines." Ann Allergy 59 (1987): 43-8
  5. "Product Information. Semprex-D (acrivastine-pseudoephedrine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  6. "Product Information. Drixoral (dextromethorphan)." Schering-Plough, Liberty Corner, NJ.
  7. "Product Information. Benadryl (diphenhydramine)." Parke-Davis, Morris Plains, NJ.
  8. "Product Information. Poly-Histine-D (pyrilamine)." Bock Pharmaceutical Company, St. Louis, MO.
  9. "Product Information. Marezine (cyclizine)." Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.
  10. "Product Information. Dramamine (dimenhydrinate)" Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  11. "Product Information. Tacaryl (methdilazine)." Westwood Squibb Pharmaceutical Corporation, Buffalo, NY.
  12. "Product Information. Dimetane (brompheniramine)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  13. "Product Information. Chlortrimeton (chlorpheniramine)." Schering-Plough, Liberty Corner, NJ.
  14. "Product Information. Phenergan (promethazine)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  15. "Product Information. Optimine (azatadine)." Schering Laboratories, Kenilworth, NJ.
  16. "Product Information. Vistaril (hydroxyzine)." Pfizer US Pharmaceuticals, New York, NY.
  17. "Product Information. Antivert (meclizine)." Roerig Division, New York, NY.
View all 17 references
Moderate

Antihistamines (Includes Aceta-Gesic) ↔ Cardiovascular

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Cardiovascular Disease, Hyperthyroidism, Hypotension

Antihistamines may infrequently cause cardiovascular adverse effects related to their anticholinergic and local anesthetic (quinidine-like) activities. Tachycardia, palpitation, ECG changes, arrhythmias, hypotension, and hypertension have been reported. Although these effects are uncommon and usually limited to overdosage situations, the manufacturers and some clinicians recommend that therapy with antihistamines be administered cautiously in patients with cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and/or hyperthyroidism.

References

  1. "Product Information. Dimetane (brompheniramine)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  2. "Product Information. Chlortrimeton (chlorpheniramine)." Schering-Plough, Liberty Corner, NJ.
  3. "Product Information. Optimine (azatadine)." Schering Laboratories, Kenilworth, NJ.
  4. "Product Information. Antivert (meclizine)." Roerig Division, New York, NY.
  5. "Product Information. Tavist (clemastine)." Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ.
  6. "Product Information. Periactin (cyproheptadine)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  7. "Product Information. Zyrtec (cetirizine)." Pfizer US Pharmaceuticals, New York, NY.
  8. "Product Information. Drixoral (dextromethorphan)." Schering-Plough, Liberty Corner, NJ.
  9. Schuller DE, Turkewitz D "Adverse effects of antihistamines." Postgrad Med 79 (1986): 75-86
  10. Smith SJ "Cardiovascular toxicity of antihistamines." Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 111 Suppl (1994): 348-54
  11. "Product Information. Benadryl (diphenhydramine)." Parke-Davis, Morris Plains, NJ.
  12. "Product Information. Dramamine (dimenhydrinate)" Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  13. Woosley RL "Cardiac actions of antihistamines." Annu Rev Pharmacol Toxicol 36 (1996): 233-52
  14. "Product Information. Poly-Histine-D (pyrilamine)." Bock Pharmaceutical Company, St. Louis, MO.
  15. "Product Information. Vistaril (hydroxyzine)." Pfizer US Pharmaceuticals, New York, NY.
View all 15 references
Moderate

Antihistamines (Includes Aceta-Gesic) ↔ Renal/Liver Disease

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Liver Disease, Renal Dysfunction

Limited pharmacokinetic data are available for the older, first-generation antihistamines. Many appear to be primarily metabolized by the liver, and both parent drugs and metabolites are excreted in the urine. Patients with renal and/or liver disease may be at greater risk for adverse effects from antihistamines due to drug and metabolite accumulation. Therapy with antihistamines should be administered cautiously in such patients. Lower initial dosages may be appropriate.

References

  1. Paton DM, Webster DR "Clinical pharmacokinetics of H1-receptor antagonists (the antihistamines)." Clin Pharmacokinet 10 (1985): 477-97
  2. Meredith CG, Christian CD Jr, Johnson RF, Madhavan SV, Schenker S "Diphenhydramine disposition in chronic liver disease." Clin Pharmacol Ther 35 (1984): 474-9
  3. Rumore MM "Clinical pharmacokinetics of chlorpheniramine." Drug Intell Clin Pharm 18 (1984): 701-7
  4. Blyden GT, Greenblatt DJ, Scavone JM, Shader RI "Pharmacokinetics of diphenhydramine and a demethylated metabolite following intravenous and oral administration." J Clin Pharmacol 26 (1986): 529-33
  5. Bruce RB, Turnbull LB, Newman JH, Pitts JE "Metabolism of brompheniramine." J Med Chem 11 (1968): 1031-4
  6. Simons FE, Frith EM, Simons KJ "The pharmacokinetics and antihistaminic effects of brompheniramine." J Allergy Clin Immunol 70 (1982): 458-64
  7. Glazko AJ, Dill WA, Young RM, Smith TC, Ogilvie RI "Metabolic disposition of diphenhydramine." Clin Pharmacol Ther 16 (1974): 1066-76
  8. Simons KJ, Simons FE, Luciuk GH, Frith EM "Urinary excretion of chlorpheniramine and its metabolites in children." J Pharm Sci 73 (1984): 595-9
  9. Simons FE, Watson WT, Chen XY, Minuk GY, Simons KJ "The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of hydroxyzine in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis." J Clin Pharmacol 29 (1989): 809-15
  10. Hintze KL, Wold JS, Fischer LJ "Disposition of cyproheptadine in rats, mice, and humans and identification of a stable epoxide metabolite." Drug Metab Dispos 3 (1975): 1-9
  11. Albert KS, Hallmark MR, Sakmar E, Weidler DJ, Wagner JG "Pharmacokinetics of diphenhydramine in man." J Pharmacokinet Biopharm 3 (1975): 159-70
  12. Simons FE, Simons KJ, Frith EM "The pharmacokinetics and antihistaminic of the H1 receptor antagonist hydroxyzine." J Allergy Clin Immunol 73 (1984): 69-75
  13. Porter CC, Arison BH, Gruber VF, Titus DC, Vandenheuvel WJ "Human metabolism of cyproheptadine." Drug Metab Dispos 3 (1975): 189-97
  14. Maddox DE, Reed CE "Clinical pharmacodynamics of antihistamines." Ann Allergy 59 (1987): 43-8
  15. Huang SM, Athanikar NK, Sridhar K, Huang YC, Chiou WL "Pharmacokinetics of chlorpheniramine after intravenous and oral administration in normal adults." Eur J Clin Pharmacol 22 (1982): 359-65
View all 15 references
Moderate

Anxiolytics/Sedatives/Hypnotics (Includes Aceta-Gesic) ↔ Glaucoma

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Glaucoma/Intraocular Hypertension, Urinary Retention

Some hypnotic drugs can have an anticholinergic effect and should be used with caution in patients with glaucoma, and trouble urinating due to retention or enlarged prostate.

Moderate

Anxiolytics/Sedatives/Hypnotics (Includes Aceta-Gesic) ↔ Liver Disease

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Liver Disease

In general, anxiolytics, sedatives and hypnotics are extensively metabolized by the liver. Their plasma clearance may be decreased and their half-life prolonged in patients with impaired hepatic function. Therapy with these drugs should be administered cautiously in patients with liver disease (some are not recommended in severe liver impairment), and the dosage should be adjusted accordingly. Laboratory testing is recommended prior and during treatment.

Moderate

Anxiolytics/Sedatives/Hypnotics (Includes Aceta-Gesic) ↔ Resp Depression

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Asthma

Oral anxiolytic, sedative, and hypnotic agents may cause respiratory depression and apnea when given in high dosages or following acute overdose. However, some patients may be susceptible at commonly used dosages, including the elderly, debilitated or severely ill patients, those receiving other CNS depressants, and those with limited ventilatory reserve, chronic pulmonary insufficiency or other respiratory disorders. Therapy with anxiolytic, sedative, and hypnotic agents should be administered cautiously in these patients. Appropriate monitoring and individualization of dosage are recommended.

References

  1. "Product Information. Aquachloral Supprettes (chloral hydrate)." Medisca, Plattsburg, NY.
  2. "Product Information. Ambien (zolpidem)." sanofi-aventis, Bridgewater, NJ.
  3. "Product Information. Equanil (meprobamate)." Wallace Laboratories, Cranbury, NJ.
  4. "Product Information. Sonata (zaleplon)" Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  5. "Product Information. Placidyl (ethchlorvynol)." Abbott Pharmaceutical, Abbott Park, IL.
  6. Biban P, Baraldi E, Pettennazzo A, Filippone M, Zacchello F "Adverse effect of chloral hydrate in two young children with obstructive sleep apnea." Pediatrics 92 (1993): 461-3
  7. Murciano D, Aubier M, Palacios S, Parients R "Comparison of zolpidem (Z), triazolam (T), and flunitrazepam (F) effects on arterial blood gases and control of breathing in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)." Chest 97 Suppl (1990): s51-2
  8. Lheureux P, Debailleul G, De Witte O, Askenasi R "Zolpidem intoxication mimicking narcotic overdose: response to flumazenil." Hum Exp Toxicol 9 (1990): 105-7
  9. Greenberg SB, Faerber EN "Respiratory insufficiency following chloral hydrate sedation in two children with Leigh disease (subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy)." Pediatr Radiol 20 (1990): 287-8
View all 9 references

Aceta-Gesic (acetaminophen / diphenhydramine) drug Interactions

There are 884 drug interactions with Aceta-Gesic (acetaminophen / diphenhydramine)

Aceta-Gesic (acetaminophen / diphenhydramine) alcohol/food Interactions

There is 1 alcohol/food interaction with Aceta-Gesic (acetaminophen / diphenhydramine)

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No information available.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

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