Dealing with a Lice Outbreak? Get the Best Treatment Now.

methamphetamine

Pronunciation

Generic Name: methamphetamine (METH am FET a meen)
Brand Name: Desoxyn, Desoxyn Gradumet

What is methamphetamine?

Methamphetamine is a central nervous system stimulant. It affects chemicals in the brain and nerves that contribute to hyperactivity and impulse control.

Methamphetamine is used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It is also used to treat obesity after other diets or medications have been tried without successful weight loss.

Methamphetamine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about methamphetamine?

Methamphetamine is a drug of abuse and may be habit-forming, especially with long-term use for weight loss. Do not take this medicine for longer than recommended. Never share methamphetamine with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it.

Slideshow: Newly Approved Weight Loss Drugs: Can They Help You?

When used to treat obesity, methamphetamine should be used only after other diets or medications have been tried without successful weight loss.

You should not use this medication if you have severe coronary artery disease (hardening of the arteries), current heart problems, moderate to severe high blood pressure, overactive thyroid, glaucoma, severe anxiety or agitation, or a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

Do not use methamphetamine if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine, and others.

What should I discuss with my doctor before taking methamphetamine?

Do not use methamphetamine if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine, and others.

You should not take this medicine if you are allergic to methamphetamine or other stimulants, or if you have:

  • current heart problems, moderate to severe high blood pressure (hypertension);

  • severe coronary artery disease (hardening of the arteries);

  • overactive thyroid;

  • glaucoma;

  • severe anxiety, tension, or agitation; or

  • if you have a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

Some stimulants have caused sudden death in people with serious heart problems or congenital heart defects. Tell your doctor if you have:

  • heart disease, heart rhythm disorder;

  • coronary artery disease; or

  • history of heart attack.

To make sure methamphetamine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • high blood pressure;

  • thyroid disorder

  • a personal or family history of mental illness, psychotic disorder, bipolar illness, depression, or suicide attempt;

  • peripheral vascular disease such as Raynaud's syndrome;

  • diabetes;

  • a history of seizures (convulsions) or an abnormal brain wave test called at EEG (electro-encephalograph); or

  • tics (muscle twitches) or Tourette's syndrome.

Methamphetamine is a drug of abuse and may be habit-forming, especially with long-term use for weight loss. Never share methamphetamine with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether this medication will harm an unborn baby. It could cause premature birth, low birth weight, or withdrawal symptoms in a newborn if the mother takes methamphetamine during pregnancy. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication.

Methamphetamine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while using this medicine.

Methamphetamine can affect growth in children. Talk with your doctor if you think your child is not growing at a normal rate while using this medication.

Do not give this medicine to a child with ADHD who is younger than 6 years old without the advice of a doctor. Do not use methamphetamine to treat obesity in a child younger than 12 years old without the advice of a doctor.

How should I take methamphetamine?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Never take this medicine in larger amounts, or for longer than prescribed.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose or have you stop taking the medicine to make sure you get the best results. Follow all dosing instructions very carefully.

If you are taking methamphetamine to treat obesity and your appetite gradually increases, do not increase your dose. Stop taking the medicine and call your doctor.

Your doctor will need to check your progress while you are using methamphetamine. Your blood pressure and heart rate will need to be checked often.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

Keep track of the amount of medicine used from each new bottle. You should be aware if anyone is using your medicine improperly or without a prescription. Using this medication improperly can cause death or serious side effects on the heart.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose, or if it is already evening. Taking this medicine late in the day can cause sleep problems. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of methamphetamine can be fatal.

Overdose symptoms may include restlessness, tremor, muscle twitches, rapid breathing, confusion, hallucinations, panic, aggression, unexplained muscle pain or tenderness, muscle weakness, fever or flu symptoms, and dark colored urine. These symptoms may be followed by depression and tiredness. Other overdose symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain, uneven heartbeats, feeling light-headed, fainting, seizure (convulsions), or coma.

What should I avoid while taking methamphetamine?

Methamphetamine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.

Do not take methamphetamine late in the day or you could have sleep problems (insomnia).

Avoid drinking cranberry juice or taking vitamin C at the same time you take methamphetamine. These can make your body absorb less of the medicine.

Methamphetamine side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Some stimulants have caused sudden death in people with serious heart problems or congenital heart defects. Get emergency medical help if you have chest pain, shortness of breath, or feel like you might pass out.

Stop using methamphetamine and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • severe restless feeling, unusual thoughts or behavior, hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that are not real), paranoia;

  • hostile or aggressive behavior;

  • vision changes;

  • seizures (convulsions);

  • numbness, pain, cold feeling, unexplained wounds, or skin color changes (pale, red, or blue appearance) in your fingers or toes;

  • pounding heartbeats or fluttering in your chest, chest pain spreading to the jaw or shoulder;

  • penis erection that is painful or lasts 4 hours or longer (rare); or

  • sudden numbness or weakness (especially on one side of the body), sudden severe headache, slurred speech, problems with vision or balance.

Common side effects may include:

  • headache or dizziness;

  • sleep problems (insomnia);

  • dry mouth, upset stomach;

  • tremors; or

  • loss of appetite, weight loss.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

Methamphetamine dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Obesity:

For short-term (i.e., a few weeks) use in Exogenous Obesity:

One 5 mg tablet should be taken one-half hour before each meal. Treatment should not exceed a few weeks in duration.

Methamphetamine may be used as an adjunct in a regimen of weight reduction based on caloric restriction, for patients in whom obesity is refractory to alternative therapy, e.g., repeated diets, group programs, and other drugs.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Attention Deficit Disorder:

>= 6 years:
Initial Dose: 5 mg once or twice a day is recommended.
Daily dosage may be raised in increments of 5 mg at weekly intervals until an optimum clinical response is achieved. The usual effective dose is 20 to 25 mg daily. The total daily dose may be given in two divided doses daily.

Where possible, drug administration should be interrupted occasionally to determine if there is a recurrence of behavioral symptoms sufficient to require continued therapy.

Methamphetamine therapy is indicated as an integral part of a total treatment program which typically includes other remedial measures (psychological, educational, social) for a stabilizing effect in children over 6 years of age with a behavioral syndrome characterized by the following group of developmentally inappropriate symptoms: moderate to severe distractibility, short attention span, hyperactivity, emotional lability, and impulsivity. The diagnosis of this syndrome should not be made with finality when these symptoms are only of comparatively recent origin. Nonlocalizing (soft) neurological signs, learning disability, and abnormal EEG may or may not be present, and a diagnosis of central nervous system dysfunction may or may not be warranted.

Decrements in the predicted growth (i.e., weight gain and/or height) rate have been reported with the long-term use of stimulants in children. Therefore, patients requiring long-term therapy should be carefully monitored.

Drug treatment is not indicated in all cases of the behavioral syndrome characterized by moderate to severe distractibility, short attention span, hyperactivity, emotional lability and impulsivity. It should be considered only in light of the complete history and evaluation of the child. The decision to prescribe methamphetamine tablets should depend on the physician's assessment of the chronicity and severity of the child's symptoms and their appropriateness for his/her age. Prescription should not depend solely on the presence of one or more of the behavioral characteristics.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Obesity:

<12 years: Safety and effectiveness for use as an anorectic agent have not been established.

What other drugs will affect methamphetamine?

Tell your doctor about all medicines you use, and those you start or stop using during your treatment with methamphetamine, especially:

  • medication to treat depression or mental illness;

  • insulin;

  • blood pressure medication; or

  • seizure medication.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with methamphetamine, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist can provide more information about methamphetamine.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 6.01. Revision Date: 2014-01-13, 2:33:17 PM.

Hide
(web3)