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mitomycin ophthalmic

Generic Name: mitomycin ophthalmic (MYE toe MYE sin off THAL mik)
Brand Name: Mitosol

What is mitomycin ophthalmic?

Mitomycin is an antimetabolite medicine that interferes with the growth and spread of certain cells in the body.

Mitomycin ophthalmic (for the eyes) is used during glaucoma surgery.

Mitomycin ophthalmic may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about mitomycin ophthalmic?

You should not be treated with this medicine if you are pregnant.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving mitomycin ophthalmic?

You should not be treated with this medicine if you are allergic to mitomycin.

You should not be treated with mitomycin ophthalmic if you are pregnant, or if you think you may be pregnant. Mitomycin could harm the unborn baby or cause birth defects.

Before you receive mitomycin ophthalmic, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions or allergies, and all the medicines you are using. Also make sure your doctor knows if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

It is not known whether mitomycin ophthalmic passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed after being treated with this medicine. Follow your doctor's instructions about how long after treatment you should wait before you can breast-feed again.

How is mitomycin ophthalmic used?

A healthcare provider will apply this medicine to your eye(s) during glaucoma surgery.

Glaucoma surgery is usually performed while you are awake. You will be given medicine to numb your eyes and reduce pain or discomfort during your surgery.

If general anesthesia is used for your surgery, you will not be awake during the operation.

Mitomycin ophthalmic is a liquid medicine that is applied first to a tray of tiny sponges. The sponges will soak in the mitomycin for at least 60 minutes.

Once the sponges are saturated with mitomycin, your surgeon will place the sponges directly onto your eye.

The sponges will be left in place for 2 minutes and then removed.

After the sponges are removed, your eye will be rinsed thoroughly.

Your doctor may prescribe other eye medications for you to use after surgery. Use all medications as directed. Read the medication guide or patient instructions provided with each medication. Do not change your doses or medication schedule without your doctor's advice.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Because you will receive mitomycin ophthalmic in a clinical setting, you are not likely to miss a dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Since this medicine is given by a healthcare professional in a medical setting, an overdose is unlikely to occur.

What should I avoid after receiving mitomycin ophthalmic?

Do not use other eye medications unless your doctor tells you to.

Mitomycin ophthalmic side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • blurred vision, vision loss;

  • tunnel vision, eye pain, seeing halos around lights; or

  • eye swelling, redness, severe discomfort, crusting or drainage (may be signs of infection).

Common side effects may include:

  • eye redness; or

  • vision changes.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

Mitomycin ophthalmic dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Glaucoma:

As an adjunct to ab externo glaucoma surgery:

0.2 mg of mitomycin in fully saturated sponges provided with the kit. Apply fully saturated sponges equally to the treatment area, in a single layer, with the use of a surgical forceps. Keep the sponges on the treatment area for two (2) minutes,

What other drugs will affect mitomycin ophthalmic?

It is not likely that other drugs you take orally or inject will have an effect on mitomycin used in the eyes. But many drugs can interact with each other. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all medicines you use, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist can provide more information about mitomycin ophthalmic.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 1.01.

Last reviewed: October 21, 2016
Date modified: November 30, 2016

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