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Orajel Maximum Strength Toothache Disease Interactions

There are 3 disease interactions with Orajel Maximum Strength Toothache (acetaminophen).

Major

Acetaminophen (applies to Orajel Maximum Strength Toothache) alcoholism

Major Potential Hazard, High plausibility.

Chronic alcohol abusers may be at increased risk of hepatotoxicity during treatment with acetaminophen (APAP). Severe liver injury, including cases of acute liver failure resulting in liver transplant and death, has been reported in patients using acetaminophen. Therapy with acetaminophen should be administered cautiously, if at all, in patients who consume three or more alcoholic drinks a day. In general, patients should avoid drinking alcohol while taking acetaminophen-containing medications. Patients should be warned not to exceed the maximum recommended total daily dosage of acetaminophen (4 g/day in adults and children 12 years of age or older), and to read all prescription and over-the-counter medication labels to ensure they are not taking multiple acetaminophen-containing products, or check with a healthcare professional if they are unsure. They should also be advised to seek medical attention if they experience signs and symptoms of liver injury such as fever, rash, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, right upper quadrant pain, dark urine, and jaundice.

References

  1. Kaysen GA, Pond SM, Roper MH, Menke DJ, Marrama MA (1985) "Combined hepatic and renal injury in alcoholics during therapeutic use of acetaminophen." Arch Intern Med, 145, p. 2019-23
  2. O'Dell JR, Zetterman RK, Burnett DA (1986) "Centrilobular hepatic fibrosis following acetaminophen-induced hepatic necrosis in an alcoholic." JAMA, 255, p. 2636-7
  3. Seeff LB, Cuccherini BA, Zimmerman HJ, Adler E, Benjamin SB (1986) "Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in alcoholics." Ann Intern Med, 104, p. 399-404
  4. McClain CJ, Kromhout JP, Peterson FJ, Holtzman JL (1980) "Potentiation of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by alcohol." JAMA, 244, p. 251-3
  5. Kartsonis A, Reddy KR, Schiff ER (1986) "Alcohol, acetaminophen, and hepatic necrosis." Ann Intern Med, 105, p. 138-9
  6. Prescott LF, Critchley JA (1983) "Drug interactions affecting analgesic toxicity." Am J Med, 75, p. 113-6
  7. (2002) "Product Information. Tylenol (acetaminophen)." McNeil Pharmaceutical
  8. Whitcomb DC, Block GD (1994) "Association of acetaminopphen hepatotoxicity with fasting and ethanol use." JAMA, 272, p. 1845-50
  9. Bonkovsky HL (1995) "Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, fasting, and ethanol." JAMA, 274, p. 301
  10. Nelson EB, Temple AR (1995) "Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, fasting, and ethanol." JAMA, 274, p. 301
  11. Zimmerman HJ, Maddrey WC (1995) "Acetaminophen (paracetamol) hepatotoxicity with regular intake of alcohol: analysis of instances of therapeutic misadventure." Hepatology, 22, p. 767-73
View all 11 references
Major

Acetaminophen (applies to Orajel Maximum Strength Toothache) liver disease

Major Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility. Applicable conditions: Malnourished, Dehydration

Acetaminophen is contraindicated in patients with severe hepatic impairment or severe active liver disease. Patients with hepatic impairment may be at increased risk of toxicity. Severe liver injury, including cases of acute liver failure and death, have been reported in patients using this drug. Clinical monitoring of hepatic function is recommended. Caution is advised if using acetaminophen in patients with chronic malnutrition or severe hypovolemia. Instruct patients to avoid drinking alcohol while taking acetaminophen-containing medications. Patients should be warned not to exceed the maximum recommended total daily dosage of acetaminophen (4 g/day in adults and children 12 years of age or older), and to read all prescription and over-the-counter medication labels to ensure they are not taking multiple acetaminophen-containing products, or check with a healthcare professional if they are unsure.

References

  1. (2002) "Product Information. Tylenol (acetaminophen)." McNeil Pharmaceutical
  2. (2022) "Product Information. Acetaminophen (acetaminophen)." Hikma Pharmaceuticals USA Inc.
Moderate

Acetaminophen (applies to Orajel Maximum Strength Toothache) PKU

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility. Applicable conditions: Phenylketonuria

Several oral acetaminophen and acetaminophen-combination products, particularly flavored chewable tablets, contain the artificial sweetener, aspartame (NutraSweet). Aspartame is converted to phenylalanine in the gastrointestinal tract following ingestion. Chewable and effervescent formulations of acetaminophen products may also contain phenylalanine. The aspartame/phenylalanine content should be considered when these products are used in patients who must restrict their intake of phenylalanine (i.e. phenylketonurics).

References

  1. (2002) "Product Information. Tylenol (acetaminophen)." McNeil Pharmaceutical

Orajel Maximum Strength Toothache drug interactions

There are 124 drug interactions with Orajel Maximum Strength Toothache (acetaminophen).

Orajel Maximum Strength Toothache alcohol/food interactions

There is 1 alcohol/food interaction with Orajel Maximum Strength Toothache (acetaminophen).


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More about Orajel Maximum Strength Toothache (acetaminophen)

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Drug Interaction Classification

These classifications are only a guideline. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific individual is difficult to determine. Always consult your healthcare provider before starting or stopping any medication.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No interaction information available.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.