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Before Coronary Angioplasty And Intravascular Stent Placement

AMBULATORY CARE:

Coronary angioplasty

is a procedure that opens arteries in your heart that have a buildup of plaque. Plaque is a mixture of fat and cholesterol. This procedure helps to increase blood flow to your heart.

Intravascular stent placement

is a procedure to place a stent in an artery of your heart that has plaque buildup. Plaque is a mixture of fat and cholesterol. A stent is a small mesh tube made of metal that helps keep your artery open. A stent may be placed during a coronary angioplasty. Your healthcare provider may place a bare metal stent or a drug-eluting stent (DES) in your artery. A DES is coated with medicine that is slowly released and helps prevent more plaque buildup in the area where the stent is placed. The stent remains in your artery for life. You may need more than one stent.


Contact your healthcare provider if:

  • You have a fever or symptoms of the flu the day before, or the day of, your procedure.
  • You have questions or concerns about your condition or care.

Tests before your procedure:

You may need blood tests and a stress test before your procedure. You may also need angiography. Angiography is a procedure to look at blood vessels in your body. Angiography can be used to look for narrowing, a blockage, or problems with your blood vessels. These tests may be done several days before, or the day of, your procedure. Talk to your healthcare provider about these or other tests you may need.

What to tell your healthcare provider before your procedure:

  • Tell your healthcare provider if you have ever had an allergic reaction to contrast liquid. Contrast liquid will be used during your procedure to help healthcare providers see your heart better.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you have allergies to any medicines. Pain medicine and sedative medicine may be given during your procedure.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or think you are pregnant. X-rays used during the procedure may be harmful to your baby. Your healthcare provider may still do the procedure but decrease the amount of x-rays your baby is exposed to.

Quit smoking before your procedure:

Nicotine and other chemicals in cigarettes and cigars can cause heart, lung, and blood vessel damage. Smoking may increase your risk for complications during the procedure and prevent healing after your procedure. Ask your healthcare provider for information if you currently smoke and need help to quit. E-cigarettes or smokeless tobacco still contain nicotine. Talk to your healthcare provider before you use these products.

Eating and drinking before your procedure:

Your healthcare provider may tell you not to eat or drink anything after midnight on the day of your procedure. He may tell you that you can have clear liquids up until 2 hours before your procedure. Clear liquids include juices without pulp, water, ginger-ale and tea.

Medicines before your procedure:

Your healthcare provider will tell you what medicines to take or not take on the day of your procedure. Talk to your healthcare provider several days before your procedure about any medicines that you take regularly:

  • You may need to stop taking blood thinner, aspirin, or NSAID medicine several days before the procedure. This may prevent bleeding during and after your procedure.
  • You may need to stop taking certain vitamins or herbal supplements several days before the procedure. Some vitamins and herbal supplements may increase your risk for bleeding and other complications.
  • If you have diabetes, ask about your insulin. On the morning of your procedure, you may need to skip your dose or take a smaller dose. This will prevent your blood sugar level from going too low. Do not take your oral diabetic medicine on the morning of your procedure.
  • Ask your healthcare provider if you should take your blood pressure or heart medicine before your procedure. Do not stop your medicine without talking to your healthcare provider.
  • Take any medicine you were told to take with a sip of water on the morning of your procedure.

Arrange for someone to drive you home:

You may go home after your procedure, or you may need to spend the night in the hospital. Arrange for someone to drive you home from the hospital and stay with you for 24 hours. You may need help doing things around the house and someone to call 911 if there are complications after your procedure.

Activity after your procedure:

You will need to rest your arm or leg used for the procedure as much as possible. You will not be able to lift anything heavy for at least 48 hours. You will need to limit stair climbing for the first 48 hours and plan most of your activities on one level of your home. Ask your healthcare provider when you can return to work and your daily activities.

© 2017 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. All illustrations and images included in CareNotes® are the copyrighted property of A.D.A.M., Inc. or Truven Health Analytics.

The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

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