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Calcium carbonate / magnesium chloride Disease Interactions

There are 7 disease interactions with calcium carbonate / magnesium chloride:

Major

Calcium salts (applies to calcium carbonate/magnesium chloride) calcium- phosphate calcifications

Major Potential Hazard, High plausibility. Applicable conditions: Phosphate Imbalance

Elevated serum concentrations of calcium and phosphate can exceed the solubility level and result in calcium- phosphate precipitates that deposit in vascular and renal systems as well as other soft tissues of the body. Therapy with calcium should be administered with extreme caution in patients with hyperphosphatemia (hypoparathyroidism or severe renal impairment). Administration of oral calcium acetate or calcium carbonate, in addition to providing calcium, complexes phosphates within the GI tract. These complexes are eliminated in the feces. Clinical monitoring of serum calcium and phosphate concentrations is necessary.

References

  1. "Product Information. Posture (calcium phosphate, triphasic)." Whitehall-Robbins, Madison, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Neo-Calglucon (calcium glubionate)." Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ.
Major

Calcium salts (applies to calcium carbonate/magnesium chloride) cardiac contraction/conduction

Major Potential Hazard, High plausibility. Applicable conditions: Arrhythmias

Calcium is involved in cardiac muscle contraction and electrical impulse conduction. Therapy with calcium salt formulations (particularly IV) should be administered cautiously to patients with cardiac disease. Patients receiving cardiac glycosides and concomitant IV calcium may experience arrhythmias. Therapy with IV calcium should be administered slowly and at reduced dosages in patients with cardiac disease.

References

  1. "Product Information. Posture (calcium phosphate, triphasic)." Whitehall-Robbins, Madison, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Neo-Calglucon (calcium glubionate)." Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ.
Major

Calcium salts (applies to calcium carbonate/magnesium chloride) malabsorption

Major Potential Hazard, High plausibility. Applicable conditions: Achlorhydria, Malabsorption Syndrome

Calcium is absorbed from the intestinal tract by active transport and passive diffusion. Malabsorption syndromes (celiac disease, GI resection), deficiency of vitamin D, parathyroid hormone, or calcitonin, or an alkaline gastric pH (achlorhydria, carbonate or phosphate salts) can decrease the absorption of oral formulations of calcium. Calcium is available in oral and parenteral formulations.

References

  1. "Product Information. Neo-Calglucon (calcium glubionate)." Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Posture (calcium phosphate, triphasic)." Whitehall-Robbins, Madison, NJ.
Major

Calcium salts (applies to calcium carbonate/magnesium chloride) renal dysfunction

Major Potential Hazard, High plausibility.

Absorption of oral calcium formulations may be altered and elimination of calcium by the kidney decreased with renal impairment. Hyperphosphatemia occurs during renal failure. Calcium acetate or calcium carbonate, in addition to providing calcium, complexes phosphates within the GI tract. Calcium carbonate can partially correct metabolic acidosis associated with chronic renal failure. Clinical monitoring of renal function and serum calcium and phosphate concentrations is necessary.

References

  1. "Product Information. Neo-Calglucon (calcium glubionate)." Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Posture (calcium phosphate, triphasic)." Whitehall-Robbins, Madison, NJ.
Major

Calcium salts (applies to calcium carbonate/magnesium chloride) sarcoidosis

Major Potential Hazard, High plausibility.

Hypercalciuria, with or without hypercalcemia, may occasionally occur in patients with sarcoidosis. Elevated calcium levels may result from increased intestinal absorption of calcium, which is related to the extrarenal production of vitamin D by mononuclear phagocytes present within the sarcoid granuloma. Therapy with calcium salts should be administered cautiously and only if necessary in patients with sarcoidosis.

References

  1. "Product Information. Neo-Calglucon (calcium glubionate)." Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ.
  2. Fauci AS, Braunwald E, Isselbacher KJ, Wilson JD, Martin JB, Kasper DL, Hauser SL, Longo DL, eds. "Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 14th ed." New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Health Professionals Division (1998):
  3. "Product Information. Posture (calcium phosphate, triphasic)." Whitehall-Robbins, Madison, NJ.
Major

Magnesium IV (applies to calcium carbonate/magnesium chloride) cardiac disease

Major Potential Hazard, High plausibility. Applicable conditions: Heart Block, Myocardial Infarction

The parenteral administration of magnesium is contraindicated in patients with heart block or heart damage from myocardial infarction. These conditions may be exacerbated during magnesium infusion. High serum levels of magnesium (> 4.5 mEq/L) can cause sinus bradycardia, AV block, nodal rhythms, and bundle branch block, which can progress to asystole and cardiac arrest at magnesium levels of approximately 14 mEq/L to 15 mEq/L. If parenteral magnesium is used in patients with preexisting conduction disturbances, it should be infused at a slower rate, and cardiac function and serum magnesium level should be closely monitored. The usual precautionary measures should be observed to prevent hypermagnesemia, and IV calcium salts (e.g., calcium gluconate), pressors, cardiac pacemakers, and equipment for supportive care should be immediately available in case of acute magnesium intoxication.

References

  1. "Product Information. Magnesium Sulfate (magnesium sulfate)." Abbott Pharmaceutical, Abbott Park, IL.
  2. Sherer DM, Cialone PR, Abramowicz JS, Woods JR Jr "Transient symptomatic subendocardial ischemia during intravenous magnesium sulfate tocolytic therapy." Am J Obstet Gynecol 166 (1992): 33-5
  3. Viskin S, Belhassen B, Laniado S "Deterioration of ventricular tachycardia to ventricular fibrillation after rapid intravenous administration of magnesium sulfate." Chest 101 (1992): 1445-7
Major

Magnesium salts (applies to calcium carbonate/magnesium chloride) renal dysfunction

Major Potential Hazard, High plausibility.

Magnesium is eliminated by the kidney. The serum concentration of magnesium is increased in patients with renal impairment. Magnesium toxicity includes CNS depression, muscular paralysis, respiratory depression, hypotension and prolonged cardiac conduction time. Disappearance of the patellar reflex is a useful clinical sign of magnesium intoxication. Therapy with magnesium should be administered cautiously and dosages should be modified in patients with compromised renal function. Clinical monitoring of serum magnesium levels is recommended.

References

  1. "Product Information. Mag-Ox 400 (magnesium oxide)." Blaine, Erlanger, KY.
  2. "Product Information. Uro-Mag (magnesium oxide)." Blaine, Erlanger, KY.
  3. "Product Information. Losospan (magaldrate)." Whitehall-Robbins, Madison, NJ.
  4. "Product Information. Slow-Mag (magnesium chloride)." Searle, Skokie, IL.
  5. "Product Information. Magonate (magnesium gluconate)." Fleming and Company, Fenton, MO.
View all 5 references

Calcium carbonate / magnesium chloride drug interactions

There are 235 drug interactions with calcium carbonate / magnesium chloride

Calcium carbonate / magnesium chloride alcohol/food interactions

There is 1 alcohol/food interaction with calcium carbonate / magnesium chloride

More about calcium carbonate / magnesium chloride

Related treatment guides

Drug Interaction Classification

These classifications are only a guideline. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific individual is difficult to determine. Always consult your healthcare provider before starting or stopping any medication.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No interaction information available.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.