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Medications for Plague

Other names: Bubonic plague; Pneumonic plague; Septicemic plague

What is the plague?

The plague is an infection caused by a bacteria Yersinia pestis which is found on fleas, that live on small animals.

The bacteria can be passed to a new host in three ways. The first way is when an infected flea moves to a new host and bites it, therefore transmitting the bacterial infection. The second type of transmission is when there direct contact with infected body tissue or body fluids from an infected animal or person. The third way the plague bacteria is passed on is when a patient with a plague infection of the lungs (pneumonic plague) coughs or breathes out small particles containing bacteria and another person then inhales those bacteria into their own lungs.

Once infected with the plague it can show as different forms. Bubonic plague usually is due to being infected from the bite from an infected flea. Once bitten the bacteria travels from the infection site through the lymph system to the nearest lymph node. At the lymph node the bacteria replicates itself causing enlarged, inflamed and painful lymph node. As well the patient will have fever, chills, headaches and weakness.

Septicemic plague is the rarest form of the plague and occurs when bacteria spreads into the blood stream either from infection from a flea bite or infected through broken skin by direct contact with infected animals. The bacteria multiply in the bloodstream causing blood clots in small blood vessels which causes the death of tissue around the blood vessels. As septicemic plague progresses the blood can no longer clot causing bleeding into the skin and vomiting or spitting up blood. If it is not treated septicemic plague is usually fatal.

Pneumonic plague can occur as a progression of bubonic plague, when the bacteria travels from the infected lymph gland to the lung tissue. Pneumonic plague can also be passed from person-to-person by inhaling infected droplets from a patient with pneumonic plague.

All forms of plague are treated with antibiotics. It is important to seek medical attention for diagnosis and treatment as early as possible to reduce complications and death rates. Sometimes antibiotics are used to prevent infection for people who have been in contact with people who have pneumonic plague.

Drugs Used to Treat Plague

The following list of medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of this condition.

Drug name Rx / OTC Pregnancy CSA Alcohol Reviews Rating Popularity
ciprofloxacin C N Add review Rate

Generic name: ciprofloxacin systemic

Brand names:  Cipro, Cipro I.V., Cipro XR

Drug class: quinolones

For consumers: dosage, interactions,

For professionals: A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

levofloxacin C N Add review Rate

Generic name: levofloxacin systemic

Brand name:  Levaquin

Drug class: quinolones

For consumers: dosage, interactions,

For professionals: A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

streptomycin D N Add review Rate

Generic name: streptomycin systemic

Drug class: aminoglycosides, streptomyces derivatives

For consumers: interactions,

For professionals: A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

Cipro C N Add review Rate

Generic name: ciprofloxacin systemic

Drug class: quinolones

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: Prescribing Information

Levaquin C N Add review Rate

Generic name: levofloxacin systemic

Drug class: quinolones

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

doxycycline D N X Add review Rate

Generic name: doxycycline systemic

Brand names:  Vibramycin, Doryx, Doxy 100, Monodox, Morgidox, Vibra-Tabs, Doryx MPC, Ocudox, Oraxyl …show all

Drug class: tetracyclines, miscellaneous antimalarials

For consumers: dosage, interactions,

For professionals: A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

Vibramycin D N X Add review Rate

Generic name: doxycycline systemic

Drug class: tetracyclines, miscellaneous antimalarials

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: Prescribing Information

Doryx D N X Add review Rate

Generic name: doxycycline systemic

Drug class: tetracyclines, miscellaneous antimalarials

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: Prescribing Information

gentamicin D N Add review Rate

Generic name: gentamicin systemic

Brand name:  Garamycin

Drug class: aminoglycosides

For consumers: dosage, interactions,

For professionals: A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

Doxy 100 D N X Add review Rate

Generic name: doxycycline systemic

Drug class: tetracyclines, miscellaneous antimalarials

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: Prescribing Information

Garamycin D N Add review Rate

Generic name: gentamicin systemic

Drug class: aminoglycosides

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

Monodox D N X Add review Rate

Generic name: doxycycline systemic

Drug class: tetracyclines, miscellaneous antimalarials

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: Prescribing Information

chloramphenicol C N Add review Rate

Generic name: chloramphenicol systemic

Brand names:  Chloromycetin, Chloromycetin Sodium Succinate

Drug class: miscellaneous antibiotics

For consumers: interactions,

For professionals: A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

Floxin C N Add review Rate

Generic name: ofloxacin systemic

Drug class: quinolones

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: Prescribing Information

Avelox C N Add review Rate

Generic name: moxifloxacin systemic

Drug class: quinolones

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

Morgidox D N X Add review Rate

Generic name: doxycycline systemic

Drug class: tetracyclines, miscellaneous antimalarials

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

moxifloxacin C N Add review Rate

Generic name: moxifloxacin systemic

Brand names:  Avelox, Avelox I.V.

Drug class: quinolones

For consumers: dosage, interactions,

For professionals: A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

ofloxacin C N Add review Rate

Generic name: ofloxacin systemic

Brand name:  Floxin

Drug class: quinolones

For consumers: dosage, interactions,

For professionals: A-Z Drug Facts, AHFS DI Monograph, Prescribing Information

Vibra-Tabs D N X Add review Rate

Generic name: doxycycline systemic

Drug class: tetracyclines, miscellaneous antimalarials

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

Chloromycetin C N Add review Rate

Generic name: chloramphenicol systemic

Drug class: miscellaneous antibiotics

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: Prescribing Information

Cipro I.V. C N Add review Rate

Generic name: ciprofloxacin systemic

Drug class: quinolones

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

Cipro XR C N Add review Rate

Generic name: ciprofloxacin systemic

Drug class: quinolones

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: Prescribing Information

Doryx MPC D N X Add review Rate

Generic name: doxycycline systemic

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

Ocudox D N X Add review Rate

Generic name: doxycycline systemic

Drug class: tetracyclines, miscellaneous antimalarials

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

For professionals: Prescribing Information

Oraxyl D N X Add review Rate

Generic name: doxycycline systemic

Drug class: tetracyclines, miscellaneous antimalarials

For consumers: dosage, interactions, side effects

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Learn more about Plague

Micromedex® Care Notes

Symptoms and treatments

Mayo Clinic Reference

Legend

Off Label This medication may not be approved by the FDA for the treatment of this condition.
Prescription Only / Over the Counter
Rx Prescription Only
OTC Over the Counter
Rx/OTC Prescription or Over the Counter
Pregnancy
A Adequate and well-controlled studies have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus in the first trimester of pregnancy (and there is no evidence of risk in later trimesters).
B Animal reproduction studies have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women.
C Animal reproduction studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use in pregnant women despite potential risks.
D There is positive evidence of human fetal risk based on adverse reaction data from investigational or marketing experience or studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use in pregnant women despite potential risks.
X Studies in animals or humans have demonstrated fetal abnormalities and/or there is positive evidence of human fetal risk based on adverse reaction data from investigational or marketing experience, and the risks involved in use in pregnant women clearly outweigh potential benefits.
N FDA has not classified the drug.
Controlled Substances Act Schedule
N Is not subject to the Controlled Substances Act.
1 Has a high potential for abuse. Has no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. There is a lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision.
2 Has a high potential for abuse. Has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States or a currently accepted medical use with severe restrictions. Abuse may lead to severe psychological or physical dependence.
3 Has a potential for abuse less than those in schedules 1 and 2. Has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. Abuse may lead to moderate or low physical dependence or high psychological dependence.
4 Has a low potential for abuse relative to those in schedule 3. It has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. Abuse may lead to limited physical dependence or psychological dependence relative to those in schedule 3.
5 Has a low potential for abuse relative to those in schedule 4. Has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. Abuse may lead to limited physical dependence or psychological dependence relative to those in schedule 4.
Alcohol
X Interacts with Alcohol.

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