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Chest Pain

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:

Chest pain can be caused by a range of conditions, from not serious to life-threatening. Chest pain can be a symptom of a digestive problem, such as acid reflux or a stomach ulcer. An anxiety attack or a strong emotion, such as anger, can also cause chest pain. Infection, inflammation, or a fracture in the bones or cartilage in your chest can cause pain or discomfort. Sometimes chest pain or pressure is caused by poor blood flow to your heart (angina). Chest pain may also be caused by life-threatening conditions such as a heart attack or blood clot in your lungs.

DISCHARGE INSTRUCTIONS:

Call 911 if:

  • You have any of the following signs of a heart attack:
    • Squeezing, pressure, or pain in your chest that lasts longer than 5 minutes or returns
    • Discomfort or pain in your back, neck, jaw, stomach, or arm
    • Trouble breathing
    • Nausea or vomiting
    • Lightheadedness or a sudden cold sweat, especially with chest pain or trouble breathing

Return to the emergency department if:

  • You have chest discomfort that gets worse, even with medicine.
  • You cough or vomit blood.
  • Your bowel movements are black or bloody.
  • You cannot stop vomiting, or it hurts to swallow.

Contact your healthcare provider if:

  • You have questions or concerns about your condition or care.

Medicines:

  • Medicines may be given to treat the cause of your chest pain. Examples include pain medicine, anxiety medicine, or medicines to increase blood flow to your heart.
  • Do not take certain medicines without asking your healthcare provider first. These include NSAIDs, herbal or vitamin supplements, or hormones (estrogen or progestin).
  • Take your medicine as directed. Contact your healthcare provider if you think your medicine is not helping or if you have side effects. Tell him or her if you are allergic to any medicine. Keep a list of the medicines, vitamins, and herbs you take. Include the amounts, and when and why you take them. Bring the list or the pill bottles to follow-up visits. Carry your medicine list with you in case of an emergency.

Follow up with your healthcare provider within 72 hours, or as directed:

You may need to return for more tests to find the cause of your chest pain. You may be referred to a specialist, such as a cardiologist or gastroenterologist. Write down your questions so you remember to ask them during your visits.

Healthy living tips:

The following are general healthy guidelines. If your chest pain is caused by a heart problem, your healthcare provider will give you specific guidelines to follow.

  • Do not smoke. Nicotine and other chemicals in cigarettes and cigars can cause lung and heart damage. Ask your healthcare provider for information if you currently smoke and need help to quit. E-cigarettes or smokeless tobacco still contain nicotine. Talk to your healthcare provider before you use these products.
  • Eat a variety of healthy, low-fat foods. Healthy foods include fruits, vegetables, whole-grain breads, low-fat dairy products, beans, lean meats, and fish. Ask for more information about a heart healthy diet.
  • Ask about activity. Your healthcare provider will tell you which activities to limit or avoid. Ask when you can drive, return to work, and have sex. Ask about the best exercise plan for you.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. Ask your healthcare provider how much you should weigh. Ask him or her to help you create a weight loss plan if you are overweight.
  • Get the flu and pneumonia vaccines. All adults should get the influenza (flu) vaccine. Get it every year as soon as it becomes available. The pneumococcal vaccine is given to adults aged 65 years or older. The vaccine is given every 5 years to prevent pneumococcal disease, such as pneumonia.

© 2017 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. All illustrations and images included in CareNotes® are the copyrighted property of A.D.A.M., Inc. or Truven Health Analytics.

The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

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