Accutane

Pronunciation

Generic Name: isotretinoin (oral) (EYE so TRET i noyn)
Brand Names: Accutane, Amnesteem, Claravis, Sotret

What is Accutane?

Accutane is a form of vitamin A. It reduces the amount of oil released by oil glands in your skin, and helps your skin renew itself more quickly.

Accutane is used to treat severe nodular acne. It is usually given after other acne medicines or antibiotics have been tried without successful treatment of symptoms.

Accutane may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information

Accutane can cause severe, life-threatening birth defects. Never use Accutane if you are pregnant.

Women of child-bearing potential must agree in writing to use two specific forms of birth control and have regular pregnancy tests before, during, and after taking isotretinoin.

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Accutane is available only under a special program called iPLEDGE. It is dangerous to try and purchase Accutane on the Internet or from vendors outside of the United States.

Do not take vitamin supplements containing vitamin A while you are taking isotretinoin. Do not donate blood while taking Accutane and for at least 30 days after you stop taking it.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Accutane?

Accutane is available only under a special program called iPLEDGE. You must be registered in the program and sign documents stating that you understand the dangers of this medication and that you agree to use birth control as required by the program. Ask your doctor or call the drug maker if you have questions about the program or the written requirements.

It is dangerous to try and purchase Accutane on the Internet or from vendors outside of the United States. The sale and distribution of Accutane outside of the iPLEDGE program violates the regulations of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the safe use of this medication.

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to isotretinoin or to parabens, or if you are pregnant or may become pregnant.

To make sure you can safely take Accutane, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • a personal or family history of depression or mental illness;

  • heart disease, high cholesterol or triglycerides;

  • osteoporosis or other bone disorders;

  • an intestinal disorder such as inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, or Crohn's disease;

  • diabetes;

  • asthma;

  • an eating disorder (anorexia nervosa); or

  • liver disease.

Accutane can cause severe, life-threatening birth defects if the mother takes the medication during pregnancy. Even one dose of Accutane can cause major birth defects of the baby's ears, eyes, face, skull, heart, and brain. Never use Accutane if you are pregnant.

For Women: Unless you have had your uterus and ovaries removed (total hysterectomy with oophorectomy) or have been in menopause for at least 12 months in a row, you are considered to be of child-bearing potential.

Even women who have had their tubes tied are required to use birth control while taking Accutane.

You must have a negative pregnancy test 30 days before you start taking Accutane. A pregnancy test is also required before each prescription is refilled, right after you take your last dose of Accutane, and again 30 days later. All pregnancy testing is required by the iPLEDGE program.

You must agree in writing to use two specific forms of birth control beginning 30 days before you start taking Accutane and ending 30 days after you stop taking it. Both a primary and a secondary form of birth control must be used together.

Primary forms of birth control include:

  • tubal ligation (tubes tied);

  • vasectomy of the male sexual partner;

  • an IUD (intrauterine device);

  • estrogen-containing birth control pills (not mini-pills); and

  • hormonal birth control patches, implants, injections, or vaginal ring.

Secondary forms of birth control include:

  • a male latex condom plus spermicidal foam or gel;

  • a diaphragm plus spermicidal foam or gel;

  • a cervical cap plus spermicidal foam or gel; and

  • a vaginal sponge containing spermicide.

Stop using Accutane and call your doctor at once if you have unprotected sex, if you quit using birth control, if your period is late, or if you think you might be pregnant. If you get pregnant while taking Accutane, call the iPLEDGE pregnancy registry at 1-866-495-0654.

It is not known whether isotretinoin passes into breast milk. Do not take Accutane without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take Accutane?

Take Accutane exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Each prescription of Accutane must be filled within 7 days of the date it was prescribed by your doctor. You will receive no more than a 30-day supply of Accutane at one time.

Always take Accutane with a full glass of water to prevent the capsule from melting in your esophagus (food pipe), causing irritation. Do not chew or suck on the capsule. Swallow it as quickly as possible. Take Accutane with food or milk. Take this medication for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor. Your acne may seem to get worse at first, but should then begin to improve.

To be sure this medication is not causing harmful effects, your blood may need to be tested often. Your liver function may also need to be tested. Visit your doctor regularly.

Never share this medicine with another person, even if they have the same symptoms you have. Store Accutane at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Skip the missed dose and take the medicine at your next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. Overdose symptoms may include headache, dizziness, vomiting, stomach pain, warmth or tingling under the skin, swelling of the lips, and loss of balance or coordination.

What should I avoid?

Do not take vitamin supplements containing vitamin A while you are taking Accutane.

Do not donate blood while taking Accutane and for at least 30 days after you stop taking it. Donated blood that is later given to pregnant woman could lead to birth defects in her baby if the blood contains any level of Accutane.

Do not use wax hair removers or have dermabrasion or laser skin treatments while you are taking Accutane and for at least 6 months after you stop taking it. Scarring may result.

Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Accutane can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Accutane may impair your vision, especially at night. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to see clearly.

Accutane side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Accutane: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using Accutane and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • depressed mood, trouble concentrating, sleep problems, crying spells, aggression or agitation, changes in behavior, hallucinations, thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself;

  • sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body;

  • blurred vision, sudden and severe headache or pain behind your eyes, sometimes with vomiting;

  • hearing problems, hearing loss, or ringing in your ears;

  • seizure (convulsions);

  • severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, fast heart rate;

  • loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

  • severe diarrhea, rectal bleeding, black, bloody, or tarry stools;

  • fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms, purple spots under your skin, easy bruising or bleeding;

  • severe blistering, peeling, and red skin rash; or

  • joint stiffness, bone pain or fracture.

Less serious Accutane side effects may include:

  • joint pain, back pain;

  • feeling dizzy, drowsy, or nervous;

  • dryness of the lips, mouth, nose, or skin; or

  • cracking or peeling skin, itching, rash, changes in your fingernails or toenails.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

What other drugs will affect Accutane?

Before taking Accutane, tell your doctor if you are also taking:

  • steroids (prednisone and others);

  • seizure medication such as phenytoin (Dilantin); or

  • a tetracycline antibiotic such as demeclocycline (Declomycin), doxycycline (Doryx, Vibramycin), minocycline (Minocin), or tetracycline (Brodspec, Sumycin, Tetracap).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Accutane. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist can provide more information about Accutane.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2014 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 9.01. Revision Date: 3/21/2011 5:30:28 PM.

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