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Pimozide

Pronunciation

(PI moe zide)

Dosage Forms

Excipient information presented when available (limited, particularly for generics); consult specific product labeling.

Tablet, Oral:

Orap: 1 mg, 2 mg [scored]

Generic: 1 mg, 2 mg

Brand Names: U.S.

  • Orap

Pharmacologic Category

  • First Generation (Typical) Antipsychotic

Pharmacology

Pimozide, a diphenylbutylperidine conventional antipsychotic, is a potent centrally-acting dopamine-receptor antagonist resulting in its characteristic neuroleptic effects

Absorption

≥50%

Metabolism

Hepatic via N-dealkylation primarily by CYP3A4, but with contributions by CYP1A2 and CYP2D6; significant first-pass effect

Excretion

Urine

Onset of Action

Within 1 week; Maximum effect: 4 to 6 weeks

Time to Peak

Serum: 6 to 8 hours (range: 4 to 12 hours)

Duration of Action

Variable

Half-Life Elimination

Tourette disorder (Sallee 1987): Children 6 to 13 years (n=4): Mean ± SD: 66 ± 49 hours; Adults 23 to 39 years (n=7): Mean ± SD: 111 ± 57 hours

Schizophrenia: Adults: Mean: 55 hours

Protein Binding

99%

Use: Labeled Indications

Suppression of severe motor and phonic tics in patients with Tourette's disorder who have failed to respond satisfactorily to standard treatment

Use: Unlabeled

Parasitosis (Delusional)

Contraindications

Hypersensitivity to pimozide or any component of the formulation; severe toxic CNS depression; coma; history of cardiac arrhythmias; congenital long QT syndrome; concurrent use with QTc-prolonging agents; hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia; concurrent use of drugs that are inhibitors of CYP3A4, including concurrent use of the azole antifungals itraconazole and ketoconazole, macrolide antibiotics (eg, clarithromycin or erythromycin [Note: The manufacturer lists azithromycin, dirithromycin, and troleandomycin in its list of contraindicated macrolides; however, azithromycin does not inhibit CYP3A4, but may interact with pimozide on the basis of QTc prolongation]), protease inhibitors (ie, atazanavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir, saquinavir), citalopram, escitalopram, nefazodone, sertraline, and other less potent inhibitors of CYP3A4 (eg, fluvoxamine, zileuton); concurrent use with strong CYP2D6 inhibitors (eg, paroxetine); concurrent use with medications that may cause motor or phonic tics (eg, amphetamines, methylphenidate, pemoline) until it is determined if medications or Tourette’s is causing tics; treatment of simple tics or tics other than Tourette's

Dosing: Adult

Note: An ECG should be performed baseline and periodically thereafter, especially during dosage adjustment.

Tourette disorder: Oral: Initial: 1 to 2 mg/day in divided doses, then increase dosage as needed every other day; maximum dose: 10 mg/day or 0.2 mg/kg/day (whichever is less); Note: If therapy requires exceeding dose of 4 mg/day, CYP2D6 geno-/phenotyping should be performed; CYP2D6 poor metabolizers should be dose titrated in ≥14-day increments and should not receive doses in excess of 4 mg/day.

Delusional parasitosis (off-label): Oral: Initial: 0.5 to 2 mg once daily. Increase dose based on response and tolerability in 1 mg increments every 3 to 7 days up to a usual dosage of 2 to 4 mg daily (doses up to 12 mg daily have been studied, however manufacturer labeling recommends a maximum dose of 10 mg/day or 0.2 mg/kg/day). Consider taper of therapy in decrements of ≥1 mg weekly after adequate relief of symptoms for 1 month; assess for return of symptoms and need for continued long-term treatment (Lorenzo 2004). Additional data may be necessary to further define the role of pimozide in this condition.

Dosing: Geriatric

Note: An ECG should be performed baseline and periodically thereafter, especially during dosage adjustment.

Tourette disorder: Oral: Recommend initial dose of 1 mg/day; periodically attempt gradual reduction of dose to determine if tic persists; follow up for 1 to 2 weeks before concluding the tic is a persistent disease phenomenon and not a manifestation of drug withdrawal. Note: An ECG should be performed baseline and periodically thereafter, especially during dosage adjustment.

Dosing: Pediatric

Note: An ECG should be performed baseline and periodically thereafter, especially during dosage adjustment.

Tourette disorder: Oral:

Children 2 to 12 years: Initial: 0.05 mg/kg preferably once at bedtime; may be increased every third day to a maximum of 0.2 mg/kg/day (do not exceed 10 mg/day); usual range: 2 to 4 mg/day. Note: If therapy requires exceeding dose of 0.05 mg/kg/day, CYP2D6 geno-/phenotyping should be performed; CYP2D6 poor metabolizers should be dose titrated in ≥14-day increments and should not receive doses in excess of 0.05 mg/kg/day.

Children >12 years and Adolescents: Refer to adult dosing.

Dosing: Renal Impairment

No dosage adjustment provided in manufacturer’s labeling. Use with caution.

Dosing: Hepatic Impairment

No dosage adjustment provided in manufacturer’s labeling. Use with caution.

Dosing: Adjustment for Toxicity

ECG changes:

Children: QTc prolongation >0.47 seconds or >25% above baseline: Decrease dose.

Adults: QTc prolongation >0.52 seconds or >25% above baseline: Decrease dose.

NMS syndrome: Discontinue (monitor carefully if therapy is reinitiated).

Tardive dyskinesia signs/symptoms: Consider discontinuing.

Storage

Store at 25°C (77°F); excursion permitted to 15°C to 30°C (59°F to 86°F).

Drug Interactions

Abiraterone Acetate: May increase the serum concentration of CYP2D6 Substrates. Management: Avoid concurrent use of abiraterone with CYP2D6 substrates that have a narrow therapeutic index whenever possible. When concurrent use is not avoidable, monitor patients closely for signs/symptoms of toxicity. Consider therapy modification

AbobotulinumtoxinA: Anticholinergic Agents may enhance the anticholinergic effect of AbobotulinumtoxinA. Monitor therapy

Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: May diminish the therapeutic effect of Anticholinergic Agents. Anticholinergic Agents may diminish the therapeutic effect of Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors. Monitor therapy

Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors (Central): May enhance the neurotoxic (central) effect of Antipsychotic Agents. Severe extrapyramidal symptoms have occurred in some patients. Monitor therapy

Aclidinium: May enhance the anticholinergic effect of Anticholinergic Agents. Avoid combination

Alcohol (Ethyl): CNS Depressants may enhance the CNS depressant effect of Alcohol (Ethyl). Monitor therapy

Amisulpride: Antipsychotic Agents may enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Amisulpride. Avoid combination

Amphetamines: Antipsychotic Agents may diminish the stimulatory effect of Amphetamines. Monitor therapy

Analgesics (Opioid): Anticholinergic Agents may enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Analgesics (Opioid). Specifically, the risk for constipation and urinary retention may be increased with this combination. Monitor therapy

Anticholinergic Agents: May enhance the adverse/toxic effect of other Anticholinergic Agents. Monitor therapy

Antifungal Agents (Azole Derivatives, Systemic): May enhance the arrhythmogenic effect of Pimozide. Antifungal Agents (Azole Derivatives, Systemic) may increase the serum concentration of Pimozide. This increase in serum concentrations may lead to QTc interval prolongation and ventricular arrhythmias. Applicable Isavuconazonium considerations are addressed in separate monographs. Exceptions: Isavuconazonium Sulfate. Avoid combination

Anti-Parkinson Agents (Dopamine Agonist): May diminish the therapeutic effect of Antipsychotic Agents (First Generation [Typical]). Antipsychotic Agents (First Generation [Typical]) may diminish the therapeutic effect of Anti-Parkinson Agents (Dopamine Agonist). Management: Avoid concomitant therapy if possible and monitor for decreased effects of both agents when these combinations cannot be avoided. Atypical antipsychotics such as clozapine and quetiapine may be less likely to reduce the effects of anti-Parkinson agents. Consider therapy modification

Aprepitant: May increase the serum concentration of Pimozide. Avoid combination

Asunaprevir: May increase the serum concentration of CYP2D6 Substrates. Consider therapy modification

Azelastine (Nasal): CNS Depressants may enhance the CNS depressant effect of Azelastine (Nasal). Avoid combination

Blonanserin: CNS Depressants may enhance the CNS depressant effect of Blonanserin. Consider therapy modification

Boceprevir: May increase the serum concentration of Pimozide. Avoid combination

Bosentan: May decrease the serum concentration of CYP3A4 Substrates. Monitor therapy

Brimonidine (Topical): May enhance the CNS depressant effect of CNS Depressants. Monitor therapy

Cannabis: May decrease the serum concentration of CYP1A2 Substrates. Monitor therapy

Cannabis: May enhance the CNS depressant effect of CNS Depressants. Monitor therapy

Cimetropium: Anticholinergic Agents may enhance the anticholinergic effect of Cimetropium. Avoid combination

CNS Depressants: May enhance the adverse/toxic effect of other CNS Depressants. Monitor therapy

Conivaptan: May increase the serum concentration of CYP3A4 Substrates. Avoid combination

Crizotinib: May enhance the QTc-prolonging effect of Pimozide. Crizotinib may increase the serum concentration of Pimozide. Avoid combination

CYP1A2 Inducers (Strong): May increase the metabolism of CYP1A2 Substrates. Management: Consider an alternative for one of the interacting drugs. Some combinations may be specifically contraindicated. Consult appropriate manufacturer labeling. Consider therapy modification

CYP1A2 Inhibitors (Moderate): May decrease the metabolism of CYP1A2 Substrates. Monitor therapy

CYP1A2 Inhibitors (Strong): May decrease the metabolism of CYP1A2 Substrates. Consider therapy modification

CYP2D6 Inhibitors (Moderate): May decrease the metabolism of CYP2D6 Substrates. Monitor therapy

CYP2D6 Inhibitors (Strong): May increase the serum concentration of Pimozide. Avoid combination

CYP3A4 Inducers (Moderate): May decrease the serum concentration of CYP3A4 Substrates. Monitor therapy

CYP3A4 Inducers (Strong): May increase the metabolism of CYP3A4 Substrates. Management: Consider an alternative for one of the interacting drugs. Some combinations may be specifically contraindicated. Consult appropriate manufacturer labeling. Consider therapy modification

CYP3A4 Inhibitors (Moderate): May increase the serum concentration of Pimozide. Avoid combination

CYP3A4 Inhibitors (Strong): May increase the serum concentration of Pimozide. Avoid combination

CYP3A4 Inhibitors (Weak): May increase the serum concentration of Pimozide. Avoid combination

Cyproterone: May decrease the serum concentration of CYP1A2 Substrates. Monitor therapy

Dabrafenib: May decrease the serum concentration of CYP3A4 Substrates. Management: Seek alternatives to the CYP3A4 substrate when possible. If concomitant therapy cannot be avoided, monitor clinical effects of the substrate closely (particularly therapeutic effects). Consider therapy modification

Deferasirox: May decrease the serum concentration of CYP3A4 Substrates. Monitor therapy

Deferasirox: May increase the serum concentration of CYP1A2 Substrates. Monitor therapy

Dimethindene: May enhance the CNS depressant effect of CNS Depressants. Monitor therapy

Doxylamine: May enhance the CNS depressant effect of CNS Depressants. Management: The manufacturer of Diclegis (doxylamine/pyridoxine), intended for use in pregnancy, specifically states that use with other CNS depressants is not recommended. Monitor therapy

Dronabinol: May enhance the CNS depressant effect of CNS Depressants. Monitor therapy

Eluxadoline: Anticholinergic Agents may enhance the constipating effect of Eluxadoline. Avoid combination

Enzalutamide: May decrease the serum concentration of Pimozide. Avoid combination

Flunitrazepam: CNS Depressants may enhance the CNS depressant effect of Flunitrazepam. Consider therapy modification

FLUoxetine: May enhance the QTc-prolonging effect of Pimozide. FLUoxetine may increase the serum concentration of Pimozide. Avoid combination

Fosaprepitant: May increase the serum concentration of Pimozide. The active metabolite aprepitant is likely responsible for this effect. Avoid combination

Fusidic Acid (Systemic): May increase the serum concentration of CYP3A4 Substrates. Avoid combination

Gastrointestinal Agents (Prokinetic): Anticholinergic Agents may diminish the therapeutic effect of Gastrointestinal Agents (Prokinetic). Monitor therapy

Glucagon: Anticholinergic Agents may enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Glucagon. Specifically, the risk of gastrointestinal adverse effects may be increased. Avoid combination

Glycopyrrolate (Oral Inhalation): Anticholinergic Agents may enhance the anticholinergic effect of Glycopyrrolate (Oral Inhalation). Avoid combination

Grapefruit Juice: May increase the serum concentration of Pimozide. Avoid combination

Highest Risk QTc-Prolonging Agents: May enhance the QTc-prolonging effect of other Highest Risk QTc-Prolonging Agents. Avoid combination

HYDROcodone: CNS Depressants may enhance the CNS depressant effect of HYDROcodone. Management: Consider starting with a 20% to 30% lower hydrocodone dose when using together with any other CNS depressant. Dose reductions in the other CNS depressant may also be warranted. Consider therapy modification

Idelalisib: May increase the serum concentration of CYP3A4 Substrates. Avoid combination

Indapamide: May enhance the QTc-prolonging effect of Highest Risk QTc-Prolonging Agents. Consider therapy modification

Ipratropium (Oral Inhalation): May enhance the anticholinergic effect of Anticholinergic Agents. Avoid combination

Itopride: Anticholinergic Agents may diminish the therapeutic effect of Itopride. Monitor therapy

Ivabradine: May enhance the QTc-prolonging effect of Highest Risk QTc-Prolonging Agents. Avoid combination

Kava Kava: May enhance the adverse/toxic effect of CNS Depressants. Monitor therapy

Levosulpiride: Anticholinergic Agents may diminish the therapeutic effect of Levosulpiride. Avoid combination

Luliconazole: May increase the serum concentration of CYP3A4 Substrates. Monitor therapy

Macrolide Antibiotics: May enhance the QTc-prolonging effect of Pimozide. Macrolide Antibiotics may decrease the metabolism of Pimozide. This mechanism may not apply to azithromycin. Exceptions: Fidaxomicin; Spiramycin. Avoid combination

Magnesium Sulfate: May enhance the CNS depressant effect of CNS Depressants. Monitor therapy

Methotrimeprazine: CNS Depressants may enhance the CNS depressant effect of Methotrimeprazine. Methotrimeprazine may enhance the CNS depressant effect of CNS Depressants. Management: Reduce adult dose of CNS depressant agents by 50% with initiation of concomitant methotrimeprazine therapy. Further CNS depressant dosage adjustments should be initiated only after clinically effective methotrimeprazine dose is established. Consider therapy modification

Methylphenidate: Antipsychotic Agents may enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Methylphenidate. Methylphenidate may enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Antipsychotic Agents. Monitor therapy

Metoclopramide: May enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Antipsychotic Agents. Avoid combination

MetyroSINE: CNS Depressants may enhance the sedative effect of MetyroSINE. Monitor therapy

MetyroSINE: May enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Antipsychotic Agents. Monitor therapy

MiFEPRIStone: May enhance the QTc-prolonging effect of Pimozide. MiFEPRIStone may increase the serum concentration of Pimozide. Management: Avoid pimozide during and 2 weeks following mifepristone for treatment of hyperglycemia in Cushing's syndrome. The interaction magnitude could be lower with single doses used to terminate pregnancy, but neither effect has been studied clinically. Avoid combination

Minocycline: May enhance the CNS depressant effect of CNS Depressants. Monitor therapy

Mitotane: May decrease the serum concentration of CYP3A4 Substrates. Management: Doses of CYP3A4 substrates may need to be adjusted substantially when used in patients being treated with mitotane. Consider therapy modification

Moderate Risk QTc-Prolonging Agents: May enhance the QTc-prolonging effect of Highest Risk QTc-Prolonging Agents. Avoid combination

Nabilone: May enhance the CNS depressant effect of CNS Depressants. Monitor therapy

Nefazodone: May increase the serum concentration of Pimozide. Avoid combination

Obeticholic Acid: May increase the serum concentration of CYP1A2 Substrates. Monitor therapy

OnabotulinumtoxinA: Anticholinergic Agents may enhance the anticholinergic effect of OnabotulinumtoxinA. Monitor therapy

Orphenadrine: CNS Depressants may enhance the CNS depressant effect of Orphenadrine. Avoid combination

Oxatomide: May enhance the anticholinergic effect of Anticholinergic Agents. Avoid combination

OxyCODONE: CNS Depressants may enhance the CNS depressant effect of OxyCODONE. Management: When oxycodone is combined with another CNS depressant, a dose reduction of one or both agents should be considered. The extended release oxycodone starting dose should be reduced 50% to 67% when initiated in patients already receiving CNS depressants. Consider therapy modification

Paraldehyde: CNS Depressants may enhance the CNS depressant effect of Paraldehyde. Avoid combination

Peginterferon Alfa-2b: May decrease the serum concentration of CYP2D6 Substrates. Peginterferon Alfa-2b may increase the serum concentration of CYP2D6 Substrates. Monitor therapy

Peginterferon Alfa-2b: May increase the serum concentration of CYP1A2 Substrates. Monitor therapy

Perampanel: May enhance the CNS depressant effect of CNS Depressants. Management: Patients taking perampanel with any other drug that has CNS depressant activities should avoid complex and high-risk activities, particularly those such as driving that require alertness and coordination, until they have experience using the combination. Consider therapy modification

Perhexiline: CYP2D6 Substrates may increase the serum concentration of Perhexiline. Perhexiline may increase the serum concentration of CYP2D6 Substrates. Monitor therapy

Piribedil [INT]: Antipsychotic Agents may diminish the therapeutic effect of Piribedil [INT]. Piribedil [INT] may diminish the therapeutic effect of Antipsychotic Agents. Management: Use of piribedil with antiemetic neuroleptics is contraindicated, and use with antipsychotic neuroleptics, except for clozapine, is not recommended. Avoid combination

Potassium Chloride: Anticholinergic Agents may enhance the ulcerogenic effect of Potassium Chloride. Management: Patients on drugs with substantial anticholinergic effects should avoid using any solid oral dosage form of potassium chloride. Avoid combination

Pramlintide: May enhance the anticholinergic effect of Anticholinergic Agents. These effects are specific to the GI tract. Consider therapy modification

Protease Inhibitors: May increase the serum concentration of Pimozide. Avoid combination

QTc-Prolonging Agents (Indeterminate Risk and Risk Modifying): May enhance the QTc-prolonging effect of Highest Risk QTc-Prolonging Agents. Management: Avoid such combinations when possible. Use should be accompanied by close monitoring for evidence of QT prolongation or other alterations of cardiac rhythm. Consider therapy modification

Quinagolide: Antipsychotic Agents may diminish the therapeutic effect of Quinagolide. Monitor therapy

Ramosetron: Anticholinergic Agents may enhance the constipating effect of Ramosetron. Monitor therapy

RimabotulinumtoxinB: Anticholinergic Agents may enhance the anticholinergic effect of RimabotulinumtoxinB. Monitor therapy

Rolapitant: May increase the serum concentration of Pimozide. Avoid combination

Rufinamide: May enhance the adverse/toxic effect of CNS Depressants. Specifically, sleepiness and dizziness may be enhanced. Monitor therapy

Secretin: Anticholinergic Agents may diminish the therapeutic effect of Secretin. Management: Avoid using drugs with substantial anticholinergic effects in patients receiving secretin whenever possible. If such agents must be used in combination, monitor closely for a diminished response to secretin. Consider therapy modification

Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors: May enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Pimozide. Avoid combination

Serotonin Modulators: May enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Antipsychotic Agents. Specifically, serotonin modulators may enhance dopamine blockade, possibly increasing the risk for neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Antipsychotic Agents may enhance the serotonergic effect of Serotonin Modulators. This could result in serotonin syndrome. Exceptions: Nicergoline. Monitor therapy

Siltuximab: May decrease the serum concentration of CYP3A4 Substrates. Monitor therapy

Simeprevir: May increase the serum concentration of CYP3A4 Substrates. Monitor therapy

Sodium Oxybate: May enhance the CNS depressant effect of CNS Depressants. Management: Consider alternatives to combined use. When combined use is needed, consider minimizing doses of one or more drugs. Use of sodium oxybate with alcohol or sedative hypnotics is contraindicated. Consider therapy modification

St John's Wort: May decrease the serum concentration of CYP3A4 Substrates. Management: Consider an alternative for one of the interacting drugs. Some combinations may be specifically contraindicated. Consult appropriate manufacturer labeling. Consider therapy modification

Stiripentol: May increase the serum concentration of CYP3A4 Substrates. Management: Use of stiripentol with CYP3A4 substrates that are considered to have a narrow therapeutic index should be avoided due to the increased risk for adverse effects and toxicity. Any CYP3A4 substrate used with stiripentol requires closer monitoring. Consider therapy modification

Sulpiride: Antipsychotic Agents may enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Sulpiride. Avoid combination

Suvorexant: CNS Depressants may enhance the CNS depressant effect of Suvorexant. Management: Dose reduction of suvorexant and/or any other CNS depressant may be necessary. Use of suvorexant with alcohol is not recommended, and the use of suvorexant with any other drug to treat insomnia is not recommended. Consider therapy modification

Tapentadol: May enhance the CNS depressant effect of CNS Depressants. Management: Start tapentadol at a dose of one-third to one-half of the normal dose if being initiated in a patient who is taking another drug with CNS depressant effects. Monitor closely for evidence of excessive CNS depression. Consider therapy modification

Telaprevir: May increase the serum concentration of Pimozide. Avoid combination

Teriflunomide: May decrease the serum concentration of CYP1A2 Substrates. Monitor therapy

Tetrahydrocannabinol: May enhance the CNS depressant effect of CNS Depressants. Monitor therapy

Thalidomide: CNS Depressants may enhance the CNS depressant effect of Thalidomide. Avoid combination

Thiazide and Thiazide-Like Diuretics: Anticholinergic Agents may increase the serum concentration of Thiazide and Thiazide-Like Diuretics. Monitor therapy

Tiotropium: Anticholinergic Agents may enhance the anticholinergic effect of Tiotropium. Avoid combination

Tocilizumab: May decrease the serum concentration of CYP3A4 Substrates. Monitor therapy

Topiramate: Anticholinergic Agents may enhance the adverse/toxic effect of Topiramate. Monitor therapy

Trimeprazine: May enhance the CNS depressant effect of CNS Depressants. Monitor therapy

Umeclidinium: May enhance the anticholinergic effect of Anticholinergic Agents. Avoid combination

Vinflunine: May enhance the QTc-prolonging effect of Highest Risk QTc-Prolonging Agents. Avoid combination

Zileuton: May increase the serum concentration of Pimozide. Avoid combination

Zolpidem: CNS Depressants may enhance the CNS depressant effect of Zolpidem. Management: Reduce the Intermezzo brand sublingual zolpidem adult dose to 1.75 mg for men who are also receiving other CNS depressants. No such dose change is recommended for women. Avoid use with other CNS depressants at bedtime; avoid use with alcohol. Consider therapy modification

Test Interactions

Increased prolactin (S)

Adverse Reactions

Frequencies as reported in adults (limited data) and/or children with Tourette's disorder:

>10%:

Central nervous system: Sedation (70%), akathisia (40%), akinesia (40%), drowsiness (35%), behavior changes (22% to 25%), somnolence (up to 25% in children)

Gastrointestinal: Xerostomia (25%), constipation (20%)

Genitourinary: Impotence (15%)

Neuromuscular & skeletal: Muscle tightness (15%), weakness (14%)

Ocular: Accommodation decreased (20%), visual disturbance (3% to 20%)

1% to 10%:

Cardiovascular: Abnormal ECG (3%)

Central nervous system: Depression (10%), insomnia (10%), speech disorder (10%), nervousness (5% to 6%), headache (3% to 5%), dreams abnormal (3%), hyperkinesias (3%)

Dermatologic: Rash (3%)

Gastrointestinal: Salivation increased (6%), appetite increased (5%), diarrhea (5%), taste disturbance (5%), thirst (5%), dysphagia (3%)

Neuromuscular & skeletal: Rigidity (10%), stooped posture (10%), handwriting change (5%), myalgia (3%), torticollis (3%), tremor (3%)

Ocular: Photophobia (5%)

Frequency not defined, postmarketing, and/or case reports (some reported for disorders other than Tourette's disorder): Anorexia, blurred vision, cataracts, chest pain, diaphoresis, dizziness, excitement; extrapyramidal symptoms (dystonia, pseudoparkinsonism, tardive dyskinesia); GI distress, gingival hyperplasia (case report), hemolytic anemia, hyper-/hypotension, hyponatremia, libido decreased, nausea, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, orthostatic hypotension, nocturia, palpitation, periorbital edema, polyuria, QTc prolongation, seizure, skin irritation, syncope, tachycardia, ventricular arrhythmia, vomiting, weight gain/loss

Warnings/Precautions

Concerns related to adverse effects:

• Altered cardiac conduction: May alter cardiac conduction; life-threatening arrhythmias have occurred with therapeutic doses of antipsychotics. Contraindicated in patients with underlying QT prolongation, in those taking medicines that prolong the QT interval, or cause polymorphic ventricular tachycardia; monitor ECG closely for dose-related QT effects. Sudden unexplained deaths have occurred in patients taking high doses (~1 mg/kg). ECG monitoring recommended periodically during therapy. Use caution with concomitant medication or conditions which cause hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia; correct hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia prior to initiation of therapy.

• Anticholinergic effects: May cause anticholinergic effects (constipation, xerostomia, blurred vision, urinary retention); use with caution in patients with decreased gastrointestinal motility, paralytic ileus, urinary retention, BPH, xerostomia, or visual problems. Relative to neuroleptics, pimozide has a moderate potency of cholinergic blockade.

• Blood dyscrasias: Leukopenia, neutropenia, and agranulocytosis (sometimes fatal) have been reported in clinical trials and postmarketing reports with antipsychotic use; presence of risk factors (eg, pre-existing low WBC or history of drug-induced leuko-/neutropenia) should prompt periodic blood count assessment. Discontinue therapy at first signs of blood dyscrasias or if absolute neutrophil count <1000/mm3.

• Esophageal dysmotility/aspiration: Antipsychotic use has been associated with esophageal dysmotility and aspiration; use with caution in patients at risk of pneumonia (ie, Alzheimer's disease).

• Extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS): May cause extrapyramidal symptoms, including pseudoparkinsonism, acute dystonic reactions, akathisia, and tardive dyskinesia. Risk of dystonia (and possibly other EPS) may be greater with increased doses, use of conventional antipsychotics, males, and younger patients. Risk of tardive dyskinesia and potential for irreversibility may be increased in elderly patients (particularly women), prolonged therapy, and higher total cumulative dose; antipsychotics may also mask signs/symptoms of tardive dyskinesia. Consider therapy discontinuation with signs/symptoms of tardive dyskinesia.

• Hyperprolactinemia: Antipsychotics are associated with increased prolactin levels; clinical significance of hyperprolactinemia in patients with breast cancer or other prolactin-dependent tumors is unknown.

• Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS): Use may be associated with NMS; monitor for mental status changes, fever, muscle rigidity, and/or autonomic instability; may also be associated with increased CPK, myogloburia, and acute renal failure. Discontinue use; may recur upon rechallenge.

• Sedation: May be sedating, use with caution in disorders where CNS depression is a feature; patients must be cautioned about performing tasks which require mental alertness (eg, operating machinery or driving).

• Temperature regulation: Impaired core body temperature regulation may occur; caution with strenuous exercise, heat exposure, dehydration, and concomitant medication possessing anticholinergic effects.

Disease-related concerns:

• Cardiovascular disease: Use with caution in patients with severe cardiovascular disease.

• Glaucoma: Use with caution in patients with narrow-angle glaucoma; condition may be exacerbated by cholinergic blockade.

• Hepatic impairment: Use with caution in patients with hepatic impairment.

• Parkinson's disease: Use with caution in patients with Parkinson's disease; they may be more sensitive to adverse effects.

• Renal impairment: Use with caution in patients with renal impairment.

• Seizure disorder: Use with caution in patients at risk of seizures, including those with a history of seizures, head trauma, brain damage, alcoholism, or concurrent therapy with medications which may lower seizure threshold.

Concurrent drug therapy issues:

• Sedatives: Effects may be potentiated when used with other sedative drugs or ethanol.

Special populations:

• CYP2D6 poor metabolizers: Increased pimozide serum concentration and prolonged half-life are observed in CYP2D6 poor metabolizers; dose adjustment required

• Elderly: Increased risk for developing tardive dyskinesia, particularly elderly women.

Monitoring Parameters

Mental status; vital signs (as clinically indicated); ECG (baseline and periodically thereafter, especially during dosage adjustment); CYP2D6 genotyping or phenotyping (baseline); weight, height, BMI, waist circumference (baseline; at every visit for the first 6 months; quarterly with stable antipsychotic dose); CBC (as clinically indicated; monitor frequently during the first few months of therapy in patients with pre-existing low WBC or history of drug-induced leukopenia/neutropenia ); electrolytes (annually and as clinically indicated; perform potassium measurement at baseline); liver function (annually and as clinically indicated); fasting plasma glucose level/HbA1c (baseline, then yearly; in patients with diabetes risk factors or if gaining weight, repeat 4 months after starting antipsychotic, then yearly); fasting lipid panel (baseline; repeat every 2 years if LDL level is normal; repeat every 6 months if LDL level is >130 mg/dL); changes in menstruation, libido, development of galactorrhea, erectile and ejaculatory function (yearly); abnormal involuntary movements or parkinsonian signs (baseline; repeat weekly until dose stabilized for at least 2 weeks after introduction and for 2 weeks after any significant dose increase); tardive dyskinesia (every 6 months; high-risk patients every 3 months); visual changes (inquire yearly); ocular examination (yearly in patients >40 years; every 2 years in younger patients) (ADA, 2004; Lehman, 2004; Marder, 2004).

Pregnancy Risk Factor

C

Pregnancy Considerations

Adverse events were observed in some animal reproduction studies. Antipsychotic use during the third trimester of pregnancy has a risk for abnormal muscle movements (extrapyramidal symptoms [EPS]) and withdrawal symptoms in newborns following delivery. Symptoms in the newborn may include agitation, feeding disorder, hypertonia, hypotonia, respiratory distress, somnolence, and tremor; these effects may be self-limiting or require hospitalization.

Patient Education

• Discuss specific use of drug and side effects with patient as it relates to treatment. (HCAHPS: During this hospital stay, were you given any medicine that you had not taken before? Before giving you any new medicine, how often did hospital staff tell you what the medicine was for? How often did hospital staff describe possible side effects in a way you could understand?)

• Patient may experience fatigue, loss of strength and energy, constipation, or dry mouth. Have patient report immediately to prescriber signs of infection, vision changes, abnormal movements, twitching, change in balance, dysphagia, difficulty speaking, arrhythmia, angina, tachycardia, severe dizziness, passing out, severe headache, tremors, difficulty moving, rigidity, seizures, agitation, behavioral changes, urinary retention, breast enlargement, nipple discharge, sexual dysfunction, amenorrhea, signs of neuroleptic malignant syndrome (fever, muscle cramps or stiffness, dizziness, very bad headache, confusion, change in thinking, fast heartbeat, abnormal heartbeat, or sweating a lot), or signs of tardive dyskinesia (unable to control body movements; tongue, face, mouth, or jaw sticking out; mouth puckering; or puffing cheeks) (HCAHPS).

• Educate patient about signs of a significant reaction (eg, wheezing; chest tightness; fever; itching; bad cough; blue skin color; seizures; or swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat). Note: This is not a comprehensive list of all side effects. Patient should consult prescriber for additional questions.

Intended Use and Disclaimer: Should not be printed and given to patients. This information is intended to serve as a concise initial reference for health care professionals to use when discussing medications with a patient. You must ultimately rely on your own discretion, experience, and judgment in diagnosing, treating, and advising patients.

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