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Potassium phosphate

Generic Name: potassium phosphate (poe TASS ee um FOSS fate)
Brand Name: Neutra-Phos-K

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Apr 21, 2020 – Written by Cerner Multum

What is potassium phosphate?

Phosphorus is a naturally occurring substance that is important in every cell of the body. Phosphorous is contained in all body cells and is used for growth and repair of cells and tissues.

Potassium phosphate is used to treat or prevent hypophosphatemia (low blood levels of phosphorus). Potassium phosphate is sometimes added to intravenous (IV) fluids given to people who cannot eat or drink anything.

Potassium phosphate may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important Information

You should not use potassium phosphate if you have low levels of calcium, or high levels of potassium or phosphorus in your body.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use potassium phosphate if you have:

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Do not give potassium phosphate to a child younger than 4 years old without a doctor's advice.

How is potassium phosphate given?

Potassium phosphate is given as an infusion into a vein. A healthcare provider will give your first dose and may teach you how to properly use the medication by yourself.

Read and carefully follow any Instructions for Use provided with your medicine. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you don't understand all instructions.

Potassium phosphate must be mixed with a liquid (diluent) before using it. When using injections by yourself, be sure you understand how to properly mix and store the medicine.

Prepare an injection only when you are ready to give it. Do not use if the medicine has changed colors or has particles in it. Call your pharmacist for new medicine.

You will need frequent medical tests.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Call your doctor for instructions if you miss a dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking potassium phosphate?

Do not use potassium supplements or salt substitutes, unless your doctor has told you to.

Avoid taking a vitamin or mineral supplement that contains calcium or vitamin D, unless your doctor tells you to.

Ask your doctor before using an antacid, and use only the type your doctor recommends. Some antacids can make it harder for your body to absorb potassium phosphate.

Potassium phosphate side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Tell your caregivers right away if you have any signs of electrolyte imbalance, such as:

  • confusion, severe weakness;

  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;

  • nausea, chest pain, irregular heartbeats;

  • numbness or tingling in your arms or legs;

  • weakness or heavy feeling in your legs;

  • loss of movement in any part of your body; or

  • slow heart rate, weak pulse, fainting, slow breathing.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Potassium phosphate dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Hypophosphatemia:

Hypophosphatemia: Dose and rate of administration are dependent on individual patient needs

Total parenteral nutrition: 12 to 15 millimolar phosphorous is recommended for each 500 mL 50% dextrose injection
-Keep in mind the amount of potassium being infused; monitor serum potassium and/or electrocardiographic changes as needed

Comments:
-Must be diluted before administration.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Hypophosphatemia:

Hypophosphatemia: Dose and rate of administration are dependent on individual patient needs

Infants receiving total parenteral nutrition: 1.5 to 2 millimolar phosphorous/kg/day
-Keep in mind the amount of potassium being infused; monitor serum potassium and/or electrocardiographic changes as needed

Comments:
-Must be diluted before administration.

What other drugs will affect potassium phosphate?

Tell your doctor about all your other medicines, especially:

  • digoxin, digitalis; or

  • a diuretic or "water pill."

This list is not complete. Other drugs may affect potassium phosphate, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.