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Metoclopramide Disease Interactions

There are 10 disease interactions with metoclopramide:

Major

Metoclopramide (applies to metoclopramide) depression

Major Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility.

Metoclopramide has been reported to cause mental depression in patients with and without a prior history of depression. Symptoms have ranged from mild to severe and have included suicidal ideation and suicide. Therapy with metoclopramide in patients with a history of mental depression, especially suicidal tendencies, should be administered cautiously, and only if benefits are anticipated to outweigh the potential risks. Some patients who experience depression with metoclopramide have improved following temporary discontinuation of the drug and reinstitution at a lower dosage with gradual titration.

References

  1. Bottner RK, Tullio CJ "Metoclopramide and depression." Ann Intern Med 103 (1985): 482
  2. Weddington WW, Jr Banner A "Organic affective syndrome associated with metoclopramide: case report." J Clin Psychiatry 47 (1986): 208-9
  3. "Product Information. Reglan (metoclopramide)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  4. Feder R "Metoclopramide and depression." J Clin Psychiatry 48 (1987): 38
  5. Adams CD "Metoclopramide and depression." Ann Intern Med 103 (1985): 960
View all 5 references
Major

Metoclopramide (applies to metoclopramide) gastrointestinal disorders

Major Potential Hazard, High plausibility. Applicable conditions: Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage, Gastrointestinal Perforation, Intestinal Obstruction

The use of metoclopramide is contraindicated in patients with conditions where stimulation of gastrointestinal motility might be harmful, such as mechanical bowel obstruction, bowel perforation, or gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

References

  1. "Product Information. Reglan (metoclopramide)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
Major

Metoclopramide (applies to metoclopramide) NMS

Major Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility. Applicable conditions: Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome

Although not a neuroleptic agent, metoclopramide has antidopaminergic effects and may rarely precipitate or aggravate a potentially fatal symptom complex known as Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS). Clinical manifestations of NMS include hyperpyrexia, muscle rigidity, involuntary movements, altered mental status and autonomic instability (irregular pulse or blood pressure, tachycardia, diaphoresis and cardiac arrhythmias). Metoclopramide therapy should not be initiated in patients with active NMS and should be immediately discontinued if currently being administered in such patients. In patients with a history of NMS, introduction or reintroduction of metoclopramide or other antidopaminergic therapy should be carefully considered, since NMS may recur.

References

  1. Donnet A, Harle JR, Dumont JC, Alif Cherif A "Neuroleptic malignant syndrome induced by metoclopramide." Biomed Pharmacother 45 (1991): 461-2
  2. Friedman LS, Weinrauch LA, D'Elia JA "Metoclopramide-induced neuroleptic malignant syndrome." Arch Intern Med 147 (1987): 1495-7
  3. Bakri YN, Khan R, Subhi J, Kawi Z "Neuroleptic malignant syndrome associated with metoclopramide antiemetic therapy." Gynecol Oncol 44 (1992): 189-90
  4. Patterson JF "Neuroleptic malignant syndrome associated with metoclopramide." South Med J 81 (1988): 674-5
  5. Nonino F "Neuroleptic malignant syndrome associated with metoclopramide." Ann Pharmacother 33 (1999): 644-5
  6. Patel P, Bristow G "Postoperative neuroleptic malignant syndrome. A case report." Can J Anaesth 34 (1987): 515-8
  7. Henderson A, Longdon P "Fulminant metoclopramide induced neuroleptic malignant syndrome rapidly responsive to intravenous dantrolene." Aust N Z J Med 21 (1991): 742-3
  8. Cassidy T, Bansal SK "Neuroleptic malignant syndrome associated with metoclopramide." Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 296 (1988): 214
  9. Brower RD, Dreyer CF, Kent TA "Neuroleptic malignant syndrome in a child treated with metoclopramide for chemotherapy-related nausea." J Child Neurol 4 (1989): 230-2
  10. "Product Information. Reglan (metoclopramide)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  11. Shintani S, Shiigai T, Tsuchiya K, Kikuchi M "Hyperventilation alternating with apnea in neuroleptic malignant syndrome associated with metoclopramide and cisapride." J Neurol Sci 128 (1995): 232-3
View all 11 references
Major

Metoclopramide (applies to metoclopramide) pheochromocytoma

Major Potential Hazard, High plausibility.

The use of metoclopramide is contraindicated in patients with pheochromocytoma. In a study involving patients with essential hypertension, intravenously administered metoclopramide was shown to induce the release of catecholamines. Hypertensive crises may occur in patients with pheochromocytoma due to induction of catecholamine release from the tumor.

References

  1. Abe M, Orita Y, Nakashima Y, Nakamura M "Hypertensive crisis induced by metoclopramide in patient with pheochromocytoma." Angiology 35 (1984): 122-8
  2. Agabiti-Rosei E, Aliccandri CL, Corea L "Hyperstensive crisis in patients with phaeochromocytoma given metoclopramide." Lancet 1 (1977): 600
  3. "Product Information. Reglan (metoclopramide)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  4. Plouin PF, Menard J, Corval P "Hypertensive crisis in patient with phaeochromocytoma given metoclopramide." Lancet 2 (1976): 1357-8
  5. Filibeck DJ, Grimm D, Forman WB, Leidner BA "Metoclopramide-induced hypertensive crisis." Clin Pharm 3 (1984): 548-9
View all 5 references
Major

Metoclopramide (applies to metoclopramide) seizures

Major Potential Hazard, High plausibility.

The use of metoclopramide is contraindicated in patients with seizure disorders. Metoclopramide may increase the frequency and severity of seizures.

References

  1. Desmond PV, Watson KJ "Metoclopramide--a review." Med J Aust 144 (1986): 366-9
  2. "Product Information. Reglan (metoclopramide)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
Major

Metoclopramide (applies to metoclopramide) tardive dyskinesia

Major Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility.

Metoclopramide may precipitate symptoms of tardive dyskinesia (TD) following chronic administration. Elderly patients, particularly women, are most susceptible. Both the risk of developing TD and the likelihood that it will become irreversible increase with the duration and total cumulative dose of metoclopramide or other antidopaminergic therapy administered. Metoclopramide therapy should be discontinued in patients who develop signs or symptoms of tardive dyskinesia. There is no known treatment for tardive dyskinesia. In some patients, symptoms may lessen or resolve after metoclopramide treatment is stopped. Treatment with metoclopramide for longer than 12 weeks should be avoided in all but rare cases where therapeutic benefit is thought to outweigh the risk of developing tardive dyskinesia. In patients with preexisting drug-induced TD, initiating or increasing the dosage of metoclopramide therapy may temporarily mask the symptoms of TD but may eventually worsen the condition.

References

  1. Bateman DN, Rawlins MD, Simpson JM "Extrapyramidal reactions with metoclopramide." Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 291 (1985): 930-2
  2. Putnam PE, Orenstein SR, Wessel HB, Stowe RM "Tardive dyskinesia associated with use of metoclopramide in a child." J Pediatr 121 (1992): 983-5
  3. Grimes JD "Parkinsonism and tardive dyskinesia associated with long-term metoclopramide therapy." N Engl J Med 305 (1981): 1417
  4. Ganzini L, Casey DE, Hoffman WF, McCall AL "The prevalence of metoclopramide-induced tardive dyskinesia and acute extrapyramidal movement disorders." Arch Intern Med 153 (1993): 1469-75
  5. "Product Information. Reglan (metoclopramide)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  6. JimenezJimenez FJ, GarciaRuiz PJ, Molina JA "Drug-induced movement disorders." Drug Saf 16 (1997): 180-204
  7. Pall HS, Williams AC "Extrapyramidal disturbances caused by inappropriate prescribing." Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 295 (1987): 30-1
  8. Miller LG, Jankovic J "Metoclopramide-induced movement disorders. Clinical findings with a review of the literature." Arch Intern Med 149 (1989): 2486-92
  9. Lavy S, Melamed E, Penchas S "Tardive dyskinesia associated with metoclopramide." Br Med J 1 (1978): 77-8
  10. Sewell DD, Kodsi AB, Caligiuri MP, Jeste DV "Metoclopramide and tardive dyskinesia." Biol Psychiatry 36 (1994): 630-2
View all 10 references
Moderate

Metoclopramide (applies to metoclopramide) fluid retention

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility. Applicable conditions: Congestive Heart Failure, Cirrhosis

Metoclopramide produces a transient increase in plasma aldosterone and may cause fluid retention and volume overload in susceptible patients. Therapy with metoclopramide should be administered cautiously in patients with or at risk for fluid overload (e.g., cirrhosis, congestive heart failure). If these side effects occur at any time during metoclopramide therapy, the drug should be discontinued.

References

  1. "Product Information. Reglan (metoclopramide)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  2. Ahmad S "Metoclopramide-induced acute congestive heart failure." South Med J 84 (1991): 283-4
Moderate

Metoclopramide (applies to metoclopramide) hypertension

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility.

In a study involving patients with essential hypertension, intravenously administered metoclopramide was shown to induce the release of catecholamines. Therapy with metoclopramide should be administered cautiously in patients with hypertension because of potential increases in blood pressure.

References

  1. "Product Information. Reglan (metoclopramide)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  2. Filibeck DJ, Grimm D, Forman WB, Leidner BA "Metoclopramide-induced hypertensive crisis." Clin Pharm 3 (1984): 548-9
Moderate

Metoclopramide (applies to metoclopramide) parkinsonism

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility.

Metoclopramide has antidopaminergic effects and may cause parkinsonian-like symptoms such as akinesia, bradykinesia, tremors, pill-rolling motion, cogwheel rigidity, and postural abnormalities including stooped posture and shuffling gait. The onset is usually within the first six months following initiation of therapy but occasionally after longer periods. Symptoms generally subside within 2 to 3 months after drug discontinuation. Therapy with metoclopramide should be administered cautiously, if at all, in patients with Parkinson's disease or parkinsonian symptoms.

References

  1. "Product Information. Reglan (metoclopramide)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  2. Miller LG, Jankovic J "Metoclopramide-induced movement disorders. Clinical findings with a review of the literature." Arch Intern Med 149 (1989): 2486-92
  3. JimenezJimenez FJ, GarciaRuiz PJ, Molina JA "Drug-induced movement disorders." Drug Saf 16 (1997): 180-204
  4. Sirota RA, Kimmel PL, Trichtinger MD, Diamond BF, Stein HD, Yudis M "Metoclopramide-induced parkinsonism in hemodialysis patients. Report of two cases." Arch Intern Med 146 (1986): 2070-1
  5. Ganzini L, Casey DE, Hoffman WF, McCall AL "The prevalence of metoclopramide-induced tardive dyskinesia and acute extrapyramidal movement disorders." Arch Intern Med 153 (1993): 1469-75
  6. Grimes JD "Parkinsonism and tardive dyskinesia associated with long-term metoclopramide therapy." N Engl J Med 305 (1981): 1417
  7. Bateman DN, Rawlins MD, Simpson JM "Extrapyramidal reactions with metoclopramide." Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 291 (1985): 930-2
View all 7 references
Moderate

Metoclopramide (applies to metoclopramide) renal dysfunction

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility.

Renal function affects the clearance of metoclopramide. In patients with varying degrees of renal impairment, a reduction in creatinine clearance was correlated with a reduction in plasma clearance, renal clearance, and non-renal clearance, and increase in elimination half-life of metoclopramide. Therapy with metoclopramide should be administered cautiously in patients with impaired renal function. A dosage reduction may be appropriate to avoid drug accumulation.

References

  1. Bateman DN, Gokal R, Dodd TR, Blain PG "The pharmacokinetics of single doses of metoclopramide in renal failure." Eur J Clin Pharmacol 19 (1981): 437-41
  2. Caralps A "Metoclopramide and renal failure." Lancet 1 (1979): 554
  3. "Product Information. Reglan (metoclopramide)." Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, Philadelphia, PA.
  4. Lehmann CR, Heironimus JD, Collins CB, O'Neil TJ, Pierson WP, Crowe JT, Melikian AP, Wright GJ "Metoclopramide kinetics in patients with impaired renal function and clearance by hemodialysis." Clin Pharmacol Ther 37 (1985): 284-9
  5. Lloveras J, Masramon J, Aubia J, Llorach M "Amiodarone, metoclopramide, and renal failure." Lancet 1 (1979): 981-2
View all 5 references

Metoclopramide drug interactions

There are 340 drug interactions with metoclopramide

Metoclopramide alcohol/food interactions

There are 2 alcohol/food interactions with metoclopramide

Drug Interaction Classification

These classifications are only a guideline. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific individual is difficult to determine. Always consult your healthcare provider before starting or stopping any medication.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No interaction information available.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.