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albumin (human)

Pronunciation

Generic Name: albumin (human) (al BUE min (HUE man))
Brand Name: Albuked, Albumarc, Albumin-Alpine, Albuminar-25, Albunex, Alburx, Albutein, Buminate, Flexbumin, Human Albumin Grifols, Kedbumin, Plasbumin-25, Plasbumin-5, Albuminar-5, Plasbumin-20, Plasbumin-25 (Low Aluminum), Albuked 5

What is albumin?

Albumin is a protein produced by the liver that circulates in plasma (the clear liquid portion of your blood). Medicinal albumin is made of plasma proteins from human blood. This medicine works by increasing plasma volume or levels of albumin in the blood.

Albumin is used to replace blood volume loss resulting from trauma such as a severe burns or an injury that causes blood loss. This medicine is also used to treat low albumin levels caused by surgery, dialysis, abdominal infections, liver failure, pancreatitis, respiratory distress, bypass surgery, ovarian problems caused by fertility drugs, and other many other conditions.

Albumin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about albumin?

You should not receive albumin if you have severe anemia (lack of red blood cells), or severe heart failure.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving albumin?

You should not use albumin if you are allergic to it, or if you have:

  • severe anemia (lack of red blood cells); or

  • severe heart failure.

If possible before you receive albumin, tell your doctor if you have:

  • anemia;

  • heart disease, high blood pressure;

  • bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia;

  • lung problems;

  • kidney disease;

  • a latex allergy; or

  • if you are unable to urinate.

In an emergency situation it may not be possible to tell your caregivers about your health conditions. Make sure any doctor caring for you afterward knows you have received this medicine.

Albumin is made from human plasma (part of the blood) which may contain viruses and other infectious agents. Donated plasma is tested and treated to reduce the risk of it containing infectious agents, but there is still a small possibility it could transmit disease. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using this medication.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether albumin will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medicine.

It is not known whether albumin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

In an emergency situation it may not be possible to tell your caregivers if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Make sure any doctor caring for your pregnancy or your baby knows you have received this medication.

How is albumin given?

Albumin is injected into a vein through an IV. A healthcare provider will give you this injection.

Your breathing, pulse, blood pressure, electrolyte levels, kidney function, and other vital signs will be watched closely while you are receiving albumin. Your blood will also need to be tested regularly during treatment.

Drink plenty of liquids while you are being treated with albumin.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Because you will receive albumin in a clinical setting, you are not likely to miss a dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Since this medication is given by a healthcare professional in a medical setting, an overdose is unlikely to occur.

What should I avoid after receiving albumin?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Albumin side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; cough, difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Tell your caregiver right away if you have:

  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;

  • weak or shallow breathing;

  • throbbing headache, blurred vision, buzzing in your ears;

  • anxiety, confusion, sweating, pale skin; or

  • severe shortness of breath, wheezing, gasping for breath, cough with foamy mucus, chest pain, and fast or uneven heart rate.

Common side effects may include:

  • nausea, vomiting;

  • fever, chills;

  • fast heart rate;

  • mild rash; or

  • flushing (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

Albumin dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Peritonitis:

Albumin 5%:

Initial dose: 250 or 500 mL IV at a rate of 1 to 2 mL per minute in the absence of overt shock. The capacity of the administration set is the only limit in the exsanguinated patient. The rate of infusion and total volume administered are determined by the condition and response of the patient. The initial dose may be followed by additional albumin within 15 to 30 minutes if the response is inadequate.

Albumin 25%:

Initial dose: The patient may require 200 to 300 mL IV to reduce edema and to bring serum protein values to normal. Since such patients usually have approximately normal blood volume, doses of more than 100 mL of albumin 25% should not be given faster than 100 mL IV over 30 to 45 minutes to avoid circulatory overload. If slower administration is desired, 200 mL of albumin 25% may be mixed with 300 mL of 10% dextrose solution and administered by continuous drip at a rate of 100 mL an hour IV.

Usual Adult Dose for Shock:

Albumin 5%:

Initial dose: 250 or 500 mL IV at a rate of 1 to 2 mL per minute in the absence of overt shock. The capacity of the administration set is the only limit in the exsanguinated patient. The rate of infusion and total volume administered are determined by the condition and response of the patient. The initial dose may be followed by additional albumin within 15 to 30 minutes if the response is inadequate.

Albumin 25%:

Initial dose: The patient may require 200 to 300 mL IV to reduce edema and to bring serum protein values to normal. Since such patients usually have approximately normal blood volume, doses of more than 100 mL of albumin 25% should not be given faster than 100 mL IV over 30 to 45 minutes to avoid circulatory overload. If slower administration is desired, 200 mL of albumin 25% may be mixed with 300 mL of 10% dextrose solution and administered by continuous drip at a rate of 100 mL an hour IV.

Usual Adult Dose for Pancreatitis:

Albumin 5%:

Initial dose: 250 or 500 mL IV at a rate of 1 to 2 mL per minute in the absence of overt shock. The capacity of the administration set is the only limit in the exsanguinated patient. The rate of infusion and total volume administered are determined by the condition and response of the patient. The initial dose may be followed by additional albumin within 15 to 30 minutes if the response is inadequate.

Albumin 25%:

Initial dose: The patient may require 200 to 300 mL IV to reduce edema and to bring serum protein values to normal. Since such patients usually have approximately normal blood volume, doses of more than 100 mL of albumin 25% should not be given faster than 100 mL IV over 30 to 45 minutes to avoid circulatory overload. If slower administration is desired, 200 mL of albumin 25% may be mixed with 300 mL of 10% dextrose solution and administered by continuous drip at a rate of 100 mL an hour IV.

Usual Adult Dose for Burns - External:

Albumin 5%:

Initial dose: 250 or 500 mL IV at a rate of 1 to 2 mL per minute in the absence of overt shock. The capacity of the administration set is the only limit in the exsanguinated patient. The rate of infusion and total volume administered are determined by the condition and response of the patient. The initial dose may be followed by additional albumin within 15 to 30 minutes if the response is inadequate.

Albumin 25%:

Initial dose: The patient may require 200 to 300 mL IV to reduce edema and to bring serum protein values to normal. Since such patients usually have approximately normal blood volume, doses of more than 100 mL of albumin 25% should not be given faster than 100 mL IV over 30 to 45 minutes to avoid circulatory overload. If slower administration is desired, 200 mL of albumin 25% may be mixed with 300 mL of 10% dextrose solution and administered by continuous drip at a rate of 100 mL an hour IV.

Usual Adult Dose for Hypoproteinemia:

Albumin 5%:

Initial dose: 250 or 500 mL IV at a rate of 1 to 2 mL per minute in the absence of overt shock. The capacity of the administration set is the only limit in the exsanguinated patient. The rate of infusion and total volume administered are determined by the condition and response of the patient. The initial dose may be followed by additional albumin within 15 to 30 minutes if the response is inadequate.

Albumin 25%:

Initial dose: The patient may require 200 to 300 mL IV to reduce edema and to bring serum protein values to normal. Since such patients usually have approximately normal blood volume, doses of more than 100 mL of albumin 25% should not be given faster than 100 mL IV over 30 to 45 minutes to avoid circulatory overload. If slower administration is desired, 200 mL of albumin 25% may be mixed with 300 mL of 10% dextrose solution and administered by continuous drip at a rate of 100 mL an hour IV.

Usual Adult Dose for Postoperative Albumin Loss:

Albumin 5%:

Initial dose: 250 or 500 mL IV at a rate of 1 to 2 mL per minute in the absence of overt shock. The capacity of the administration set is the only limit in the exsanguinated patient. The rate of infusion and total volume administered are determined by the condition and response of the patient. The initial dose may be followed by additional albumin within 15 to 30 minutes if the response is inadequate.

Albumin 25%:

Initial dose: The patient may require 200 to 300 mL IV to reduce edema and to bring serum protein values to normal. Since such patients usually have approximately normal blood volume, doses of more than 100 mL of albumin 25% should not be given faster than 100 mL IV over 30 to 45 minutes to avoid circulatory overload. If slower administration is desired, 200 mL of albumin 25% may be mixed with 300 mL of 10% dextrose solution and administered by continuous drip at a rate of 100 mL an hour IV.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Peritonitis:

Albumin 5%:

Initial dose: 10 to 15 mL per pound (4.5 to 6.8 mL per kg) of body weight IV is usually adequate accompanied by close surveillance of the child.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Shock:

Albumin 5%:

Initial dose: 10 to 15 mL per pound (4.5 to 6.8 mL per kg) of body weight IV is usually adequate accompanied by close surveillance of the child.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Pancreatitis:

Albumin 5%:

Initial dose: 10 to 15 mL per pound (4.5 to 6.8 mL per kg) of body weight IV is usually adequate accompanied by close surveillance of the child.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Burns - External:

Albumin 5%:

Initial dose: 10 to 15 mL per pound (4.5 to 6.8 mL per kg) of body weight IV is usually adequate accompanied by close surveillance of the child.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Hypoproteinemia:

Albumin 5%:

Initial dose: 10 to 15 mL per pound (4.5 to 6.8 mL per kg) of body weight IV is usually adequate accompanied by close surveillance of the child.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Postoperative Albumin Loss:

Albumin 5%:

Initial dose: 10 to 15 mL per pound (4.5 to 6.8 mL per kg) of body weight IV is usually adequate accompanied by close surveillance of the child.

What other drugs will affect albumin?

Other drugs may interact with albumin, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist can provide more information about albumin.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 1.01. Revision Date: 2014-02-13, 8:25:15 AM.

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