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Folic Acid Dosage

Applies to the following strength(s): 1 mg ; 0.4 mg ; 5 mg/mL ; 0.8 mg

The information at Drugs.com is not a substitute for medical advice. Always consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Usual Adult Dose for:

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

Additional dosage information:

Usual Adult Dose for Megaloblastic Anemia

Usual therapeutic dose: 1 mg daily, orally, intramuscularly, IV, or subcutaneously
-Resistant cases may require larger doses

Maintenance dose:
-0.4 mg daily (adults)
-0.8 mg daily (pregnancy and lactation)
Minimum dose: 0.1 mg daily

Comments:
-Oral administration is preferred; patients who cannot absorb food folates are usually able to absorb oral folic acid.
-Do not use doses greater than 0.1 mg unless B12 deficiency anemia has been ruled out or is being adequately treated.
-Closely supervise patients; adjust maintenance dose if relapse appears imminent.
-Maintenance level may need to be increased for alcoholism, hemolytic anemia, anticonvulsant therapy, or chronic infection.

Uses: Megaloblastic anemia due to folic acid deficiency (e.g. sprue) and anemias of nutritional origin or pregnancy

Usual Adult Dose for Folic Acid Deficiency

Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA):
400 mcg daily, orally, intramuscularly, IV, or subcutaneously

Pregnancy: 600 mcg daily
Lactation: 500 mcg daily

Usual Adult Dose for Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation during Pregnancy/Lactation

Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA):
400 mcg daily, orally, intramuscularly, IV, or subcutaneously

Pregnancy: 600 mcg daily
Lactation: 500 mcg daily

Usual Pediatric Dose for Megaloblastic Anemia

Usual therapeutic dose: 1 mg daily, orally, intramuscularly, IV, or subcutaneously
-Resistant cases may require larger doses

Maintenance dose:
-Infants: 0.1 mg daily
-Children under 4 years: 0.3 mg daily
-Children 4 years and older: 0.4 mg daily
Minimum dose: 0.1 mg daily

Comments:
-Oral administration is preferred; patients who cannot absorb food folates are usually able to absorb oral folic acid.
-Do not use doses greater than 0.1 mg unless B12 deficiency anemia has been ruled out or is being adequately treated.
-Closely supervise patients; adjust maintenance dose if relapse appears imminent.
-Maintenance level may need to be increased for alcoholism, hemolytic anemia, anticonvulsant therapy, or chronic infection.

Uses: Megaloblastic anemia due to folic acid deficiency (e.g. sprue) and anemias of nutritional origin, infancy, or childhood

Usual Pediatric Dose for Folic Acid Deficiency

Usual therapeutic dose: 1 mg daily, orally, intramuscularly, IV, or subcutaneously
-Resistant cases may require larger doses

Maintenance dose:
-Infants: 0.1 mg daily
-Children under 4 years: 0.3 mg daily
-Children 4 years and older: 0.4 mg daily
Minimum dose: 0.1 mg daily

Comments:
-Oral administration is preferred; patients who cannot absorb food folates are usually able to absorb oral folic acid.
-Do not use doses greater than 0.1 mg unless B12 deficiency anemia has been ruled out or is being adequately treated.
-Closely supervise patients; adjust maintenance dose if relapse appears imminent.
-Maintenance level may need to be increased for alcoholism, hemolytic anemia, anticonvulsant therapy, or chronic infection.

Uses: Megaloblastic anemia due to folic acid deficiency (e.g. sprue) and anemias of nutritional origin, infancy, or childhood

Usual Pediatric Dose for Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation

Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA):
0 to 6 months: 65 mcg orally daily
1 to 3 years: 150 mcg orally daily
4 to 8 years: 200 mcg orally daily
9 to 13 years: 300 mcg orally daily
14 and older: 400 mcg orally daily

Renal Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Liver Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Dose Adjustments

Women of childbearing age: 0.4 mg daily, started prior to conception
Women who have previously given birth to a child with neural tube defect: 4 to 5 mg daily

Dialysis

Data not available

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