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Vasocidin (prednisolone / sulfacetamide sodium ophthalmic) Disease Interactions

There are 9 disease interactions with Vasocidin (prednisolone / sulfacetamide sodium ophthalmic):

Major

Ophthalmic Corticosteroids (Includes Vasocidin) ↔ Ocular Infections

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Ocular Infection

The use of ophthalmic corticosteroids is contraindicated in most viral diseases of the cornea and conjunctiva, including epithelial herpes simplex keratitis (dendritic keratitis), vaccinia, and varicella; fungal diseases of ocular structures; mycobacterial infections, including tuberculosis, of the eye; and any acute, purulent, untreated ocular infections. Corticosteroids may decrease host resistance to infectious agents, thus prolonging the course and/or exacerbating the severity of the infection while encouraging the development of new or secondary infection. In addition, administration of ophthalmic corticosteroids in severe ocular disease, especially acute herpes simplex keratitis, may lead to excessive corneal and scleral thinning, increasing the risk for perforation. In less serious ocular infections, therapy with ophthalmic corticosteroids may be administered but only with caution and accompanied by appropriate antimicrobial agents. Besides compromising host immune response, corticosteroids may also mask the symptoms of infection, thus hindering the recognition of potential ineffectiveness of the antibiotic therapy. If infection does not improve or becomes worse during administration of an ophthalmic corticosteroid, the drug should be discontinued and other appropriate therapy initiated.

References

  1. "Product Information. FML Ophthalmic Suspension (fluoromethalone ophthalmic)." Allergan Inc, Irvine, CA.
  2. "Product Information. Decadron Ocumeter (dexamethasone ophthalmic)." Merck & Co, Inc, West Point, PA.
  3. "Product Information. Pred Forte (prednisolone ophthalmic)." Allergan Inc, Irvine, CA.
View all 6 references
Major

Ophthalmic Corticosteroids (Includes Vasocidin) ↔ Ocular Toxicities

Severe Potential Hazard, High plausibility

Applies to: Cataracts, Glaucoma/Intraocular Hypertension

Prolonged use of corticosteroids may cause posterior subcapsular cataracts and elevated intraocular pressure, the latter of which may lead to glaucoma and/or damage to the optic nerves. Therapy with ophthalmic corticosteroids should be administered cautiously in patients with a history of cataracts, glaucoma, or increased intraocular pressure. If these agents are used for more than 10 days, the manufacturers recommend that intraocular pressure be routinely monitored, including in children. The equatorial and posterior subcapsular portions of the lens should be examined for changes.

References

  1. Francois J "Corticosteroid glaucoma." Ann Ophthalmol 9 (1977): 1075-80
  2. Seale JP, Compton MR "Side-effects of corticosteroid agents." Med J Aust 144 (1986): 139-42
  3. Foster CS, Alter G, Debarge LR, Raizman MB, Crabb JL, Santos CI, Feiler LS, Friedlaender MH "Efficacy and safety of rimexolone 1% ophthalmic suspension vs 1% prednisolone acetate in the treatment of uveitis." Am J Ophthalmol 122 (1996): 171-82
View all 13 references
Major

Topical Sulfonamides (Includes Vasocidin) ↔ Hematologic Toxicity

Severe Potential Hazard, Low plausibility

Applies to: Bone Marrow Depression/Low Blood Counts

Sulfonamides may be systemically absorbed when applied to the skin, eye, or mucosal membranes. The use of sulfonamides has been associated with hematologic toxicity, including methemoglobinemia, sulfhemoglobinemia, leukopenia, granulocytopenia, eosinophilia, hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, purpura, clotting disorder, thrombocytopenia, hypofibrinogenemia, and hypoprothrombinemia. Therapy with topical sulfonamides should be administered cautiously in patients with preexisting blood dyscrasias or bone marrow suppression. Complete blood counts should be obtained regularly during prolonged therapy (>2 weeks), and patients should be instructed to immediately report any signs or symptoms suggestive of blood dyscrasia such as fever, sore throat, local infection, bleeding, pallor, dizziness, or jaundice.

References

  1. Davies GE, Palek J "Selective erythroid and magakaryocytic aplasia after sulfasalazine administration." Arch Intern Med 140 (1980): 1122
  2. Damergis J, Stoker J, Abadie J "Methemoglobinemia after sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim therapy." JAMA 249 (1983): 590-1
  3. "Product Information. Gantrisin (sulfisoxazole ophthalmic)." Roche Laboratories, Nutley, NJ.
View all 23 references
Major

Topical Sulfonamides (Includes Vasocidin) ↔ Hypersensitivity Reactions

Severe Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Allergies, Asthma, HIV Infection

Sulfonamides may be systemically absorbed when applied to the skin, eye, or mucosal membranes. The use of sulfonamides is associated with large increases in the risk of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis and other serious dermatologic reactions, although these phenomena are rare as a whole. Hepatitis, pneumonitis, and interstitial nephritis have also occurred in association with sulfonamide hypersensitivity. Therapy with topical sulfonamides should be administered cautiously in patients with severe allergies, bronchial asthma or AIDS, since these patients may be at increased risk for potentially severe hypersensitivity reactions. Patients should be instructed to promptly report signs and symptoms that may precede the onset of cutaneous manifestations of the Stevens-Johnson syndrome, such as high fever, severe headache, stomatitis, conjunctivitis, rhinitis, urethritis, and balanitis. Sulfonamide therapy should be stopped at once if a rash develops.

References

  1. "Product Information. Azopt (brinzolamide ophthalmic)." Alcon Laboratories Inc, Fort Worth, TX.
  2. Sotolongo RP, Neefe LI, Rudzki C, Ishak KG "Hypersensitivity reaction to sulfasalazine with severe hepatotoxicity." Gastroenterology 75 (1978): 95-9
  3. Williams T, Eidus L, Thomas P "Fibrosing alveolitis, bronchiolitis obliterans, and sulfasalazine therapy." Chest 81 (1982): 766-8
View all 51 references
Major

Topical Sulfonamides (Includes Vasocidin) ↔ Porphyria

Severe Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Porphyria

Sulfonamides may be systemically absorbed when applied to the skin, eye, or mucosal membranes. Therapy with topical sulfonamides should be administered cautiously in patients with porphyria, since these drugs can precipitate an acute attack. The use of oral sulfonamides is considered contraindicated in patients with porphyria.

References

  1. "Product Information. Gantrisin (sulfisoxazole ophthalmic)." Roche Laboratories, Nutley, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Sulamyd Ophthalmic Solution (sodium sulfacetamide ophthalmic)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  3. "Product Information. Sultrin (triple sulfa topical)" Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Titusville, NJ.
View all 8 references
Moderate

Topical Sulfonamides (Includes Vasocidin) ↔ Crystalluria

Moderate Potential Hazard, Low plausibility

Applies to: Dehydration, Diarrhea, Vomiting

Sulfonamides may be systemically absorbed when applied to the skin, eye, or mucosal membranes. The use of sulfonamides has been associated with crystalluria due to precipitation of the sulfonamide and/or its N4-acetyl metabolite in the urinary tract. Renal toxicity such as uro- and nephrolithiasis, nephritis, toxic nephrosis, hematuria, proteinuria, and elevated BUN and creatinine has been reported. Hydration and adequate urinary output (> 1.5 L/day) should be maintained during sulfonamide administration. Patients who are dehydrated (e.g., due to severe diarrhea or vomiting) may be at increased risk for the development of crystalluria and lithiasis and should be encouraged to consume additional amounts of liquid. Renal function tests and urinalysis should be performed regularly during prolonged therapy (> 2 weeks).

References

  1. "Product Information. Sultrin (triple sulfa topical)" Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Titusville, NJ.
  2. "Product Information. Sulamyd Ophthalmic Solution (sodium sulfacetamide ophthalmic)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  3. Molina J, Belenfant X, Doco-Lecompte T, et al "Sulfadiazine-induced crystalluria in AIDS patients with toxoplasma encephalitis." AIDS 5 (1991): 587-9
View all 15 references
Moderate

Topical Sulfonamides (Includes Vasocidin) ↔ Liver Disease

Moderate Potential Hazard, Low plausibility

Applies to: Liver Disease

Sulfonamides may be systemically absorbed when applied to the skin, eye, or mucosal membranes. Hepatotoxicity, including jaundice, diffuse hepatocellular necrosis, hypersensitivity hepatitis and hepatic failure, has rarely been reported in patients receiving sulfonamides. In addition, sulfonamides are partially metabolized by the liver and may accumulate in patients with hepatic impairment. Therapy with topical sulfonamides should be administered cautiously in patients with liver disease.

References

  1. Horak J, Mertl L, Hrabal P "Severe liver injuries due to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim and sulfamethoxydiazine." Hepatogastroenterology 31 (1984): 199-200
  2. Ribe J, Benkov KJ, Thung SN, Shen SC, LeLeiko NS "Fatal massive hepatic necrosis: a probable hypersensitivity reaction to sulfasalazine." Am J Gastroenterol 81 (1986): 205-8
  3. Ransohoff D, Jacobs G "Terminal hepatic failure following a small dose of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim." Gastroenterology 80 (1981): 816-9
View all 40 references
Moderate

Topical Sulfonamides (Includes Vasocidin) ↔ Renal Dysfunction

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility

Applies to: Renal Dysfunction

Sulfonamides may be systemically absorbed when applied to the skin, eye, or mucosal membranes. Once absorbed, sulfonamides and their metabolites are eliminated by the kidney. Patients with renal impairment may be at greater risk for adverse effects from sulfonamides due to decreased drug clearance. Additionally, sulfonamides may cause renal toxicity secondary to crystalluria, including uro- and nephrolithiasis, nephritis, toxic nephrosis, hematuria, proteinuria, and elevated BUN and creatinine. Hydration and adequate urinary output (> 1.5 L/day) should be maintained during sulfonamide administration. Renal function tests and urinalysis should be performed regularly during prolonged therapy (> 2 weeks). Some manufacturers of topical sulfonamide products do not recommend their use in patients with impaired renal function.

References

  1. Cohen M, Pocelinko R "Renal transport mechanisms for the excretion of sulfisoxazole." J Pharmacol Exp Ther 185 (1973): 703-12
  2. "Product Information. Azopt (brinzolamide ophthalmic)." Alcon Laboratories Inc, Fort Worth, TX.
  3. Christin S, Baumelou A, Bahri S, Ben Hmida M, Deray G, Jacobs C "Acute renal failure due to sulfadiazine in patients with AIDS." Nephron 55 (1990): 233-4
View all 44 references
Moderate

Topical Sulfonamides (Includes Vasocidin) ↔ Urinary Obstruction

Moderate Potential Hazard, Low plausibility

Applies to: Urinary Retention

Sulfonamides may be systemically absorbed when applied to the skin, eye, or mucosal membranes. Once absorbed, sulfonamides are excreted and concentrated in the urine. Therapy with topical sulfonamides should be administered cautiously in patients with urinary obstruction or retention, since excessive drug accumulation may occur. These patients may also be at increased risk for sulfonamide crystalluria, which may be associated with renal toxicity such as uro- and nephrolithiasis, nephritis, toxic nephrosis, hematuria, proteinuria, and elevated BUN and creatinine. A urinary output of at least 1.5 L/day should be maintained during sulfonamide administration. Renal function tests and urinalysis should be performed regularly during prolonged therapy (> 2 weeks).

References

  1. "Product Information. Sulamyd Ophthalmic Solution (sodium sulfacetamide ophthalmic)." Schering Corporation, Kenilworth, NJ.
  2. Erturk E, Casemento JB, Guertin KR, Kende AS "Bilateral acetylsulfapyridine nephrolithiasis associated with chronic sulfasalazine therapy." J Urol 151 (1994): 1605-6
  3. "Product Information. Gantrisin (sulfisoxazole ophthalmic)." Roche Laboratories, Nutley, NJ.
View all 17 references

Vasocidin (prednisolone / sulfacetamide sodium ophthalmic) drug Interactions

There are 9 drug interactions with Vasocidin (prednisolone / sulfacetamide sodium ophthalmic)

Drug Interaction Classification

The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider.

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