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Sandostatin (octreotide) Disease Interactions

There are 7 disease interactions with Sandostatin (octreotide):

Major

Octreotide (applies to Sandostatin) renal dysfunction

Major Potential Hazard, High plausibility.

Octreotide is eliminated by the kidney. Approximately 30% of octreotide is excreted unchanged in the urine. The serum concentration of octreotide and the half-life is increased in patients with severe renal dysfunction. Therapy with octreotide should be administered cautiously and dosage modification considered in patients with severe renal impairment as the half-life of octreotide may be increased, necessitating adjustment of the dosage.

References

  1. "Product Information. Sandostatin (octreotide)." Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ.
Moderate

Octreotide (applies to Sandostatin) gallbladder/biliary dysfunction

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility. Applicable conditions: Gallbladder Disease, Biliary Obstruction

Octreotide inhibits gallbladder contractility and may alter bile composition. An average of 29% of patients develop new gallstones during octreotide therapy, and up to 20% of patients develop biliary sludge. Associated pancreatitis has been reported in rare cases. Gallbladder hypercontractility, sometimes resulting in biliary colic, has been reported upon withdrawal of octreotide.

References

  1. Hussaini SH, Pereira SP, Veysey MJ, Kennedy C, Jenkins P, Murphy GM, Wass JAH, Dowling RH "Roles of gall bladder emptying and intestinal transit in the pathogenesis of octreotide induced gall bladder stones." Gut 38 (1996): 775-83
  2. Daughaday WH "Octreotide is effective in acromegaly but often results in cholelithiasis." Ann Intern Med 112 (1990): 159-60
  3. Gradon JD, Schulman RH, Chapnick EK, Sepkowitz DV "Octreotide-induced acute pancreatitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome." South Med J 84 (1991): 1410-1
  4. Dowling RH, Hussaini SH, Murphy GM, Wass JA "Gallstones during octreotide therapy." Digestion 55 Suppl 1 (1993): 107-20
  5. Sadoul JL, Benchimol D, Thyss A, Freychet P "Side-effects of octreotide withdrawal." Lancet 339 (1992): 376
  6. Redfern JS, Fortuner WJ "Octreotide-associated biliary tract dysfunction and gallstone formation: pathophysiology and management." Am J Gastroenterol 90 (1995): 1042-52
  7. Catnach SM, Wass JA, Anderson JV, Besser M, Fairclough P, Hussaini H, Dowling H "Gall stones induced by octreotide." BMJ 305 (1992): 313
  8. Fredenrich A, Sosset C, Bernard JL, Sadoul JL, Freychet P "Acute pancreatitis after short-term octreotide." Lancet 338 (1991): 52-3
  9. Dowling RH, Hussaini SH, Murphy GM, Besser GM, Wass JA "Gallstones during octreotide therapy." Metabolism 41(9 Suppl) (1992): 22-33
  10. "Product Information. Sandostatin (octreotide)." Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ.
  11. Baxter JN, Imrie CW, McKay CJ "Acute pancreatitis and octreotide." Lancet 338 (1991): 389
  12. James RA, Rhodes M, Rose P, Kendall-Taylor P "Biliary colic on abrupt withdrawal of octreotide." Lancet 338 (1991): 1527
  13. Shi YF, Zhu XF, Harris AG, Zhang JX, Dai Q "Prospective study of the long-term effects of somatostatin analog (octreotide) on gallbladder function and gallstone formation in Chinese acromegalic patients." J Clin Endocrinol Metab 76 (1993): 32-7
  14. Ahrendt SA, McGuire GE, Pitt HA, Lillemoe KD "Why does somatostatin cause gallstones?" Am J Surg 161 (1991): 177-82;disc. 182-3
View all 14 references
Moderate

Octreotide (applies to Sandostatin) glucose intolerance

Moderate Potential Hazard, High plausibility. Applicable conditions: Diabetes Mellitus

The incidence of hypoglycemia may increase during octreotide therapy due to inhibition of glucagon and growth hormone. Hyper- and hypoglycemia have been associated with the use of octreotide in nondiabetic patients with acromegaly. Clinical monitoring of blood glucose is recommended in patients with diabetes or insulinoma.

References

  1. Breidert M, Pinzer T, Wildbrett J, Bornstein SR, Hanefeld M "Long-term effect of octreotide in acromegaly on insulin resistance." Horm Metab Res 27 (1995): 226-30
  2. McKnight JA, McCance DR, Crothers JG, Atkinson AB "Changes in glucose tolerance and development of gall stones during high dose treatment with octreotide for acromegaly." BMJ 299 (1989): 604-5
  3. Osei K, O'Dorisio TM, Malarkey WB, Craig EL, Cataland S "Metabolic effects of long-acting somatostatin analogue (sandostatin) in type I diabetic patients on conventional therapy." Diabetes 38 (1989): 704-9
  4. "Product Information. Sandostatin (octreotide)." Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ.
  5. Abrahamson MJ "Death from diabetic ketoacidosis after cessation of octreotide in acromegaly." Lancet 336 (1990): 318-9
  6. Lamberts SWJ, Vanderlely AJ, Deherder WW, Hofland LJ "Octreotide exacerbated fasting hypoglycaemia in a patient with a proinsulinoma; the glucostatic importance of pancreatic glucagon - commentary." Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) 43 (1995): 120-2
  7. Gama R, Marks V, Wright J, Teale JD "Octreotide exacerbated fasting hypoglycaemia in a patient with a proinsulinoma; the glucostatic importance of pancreatic glucagon." Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) 43 (1995): 117-20
View all 7 references
Moderate

Octreotide (applies to Sandostatin) heart disease

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility.

Bradycardia, arrhythmias and conduction abnormalities, including QT prolongation have been reported with the use of octreotide. Patients taking other drugs that have bradycardic effects may need dose adjustments. Caution is recommended in patients with cardiac function abnormalities.

Moderate

Octreotide (applies to Sandostatin) hepatic impairment

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility. Applicable conditions: Liver Disease

The half-life of octreotide may be increased in patients with liver cirrhosis, necessitating adjustment of dosage. This dose should be up titrated based on clinical response and speed of response as deemed necessary by the physician.

Moderate

Octreotide (applies to Sandostatin) thyroid dysfunction

Moderate Potential Hazard, Low plausibility. Applicable conditions: Hyperthyroidism, Hypothyroidism

Rarely, hypothyroidism requiring thyroid hormone replacement may occur during chronic therapy. More commonly, a statistically significant, but usually clinically insignificant, increase in TSH may be observed, possibly caused by slight inhibition of peripheral deiodination of thyroxin. Therapy with octreotide should be administered cautiously to patients with uncontrolled thyroid disorders. Clinical monitoring of thyroid function is recommended.

References

  1. "Product Information. Sandostatin (octreotide)." Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ.
  2. Christensen SE, Weeke J, Kaal A, Harris AG, Orskov H "SMS 201-995 and thyroid function in acromegaly: acute, intermediate and long-term effects." Horm Metab Res 24 (1992): 237-9
Moderate

Octreotide (applies to Sandostatin) vitamin B12 deficiency

Moderate Potential Hazard, Moderate plausibility. Applicable conditions: Folic Acid/Cyanocobalamin Deficiency

Decreased serum concentrations of vitamin B12 have occurred during chronic administration of octreotide. Therapy with octreotide should be administered cautiously to patients with uncontrolled vitamin B12 deficiency.

References

  1. "Product Information. Sandostatin (octreotide)." Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ.

Sandostatin (octreotide) drug interactions

There are 137 drug interactions with Sandostatin (octreotide)

Sandostatin (octreotide) alcohol/food interactions

There is 1 alcohol/food interaction with Sandostatin (octreotide)

Drug Interaction Classification

These classifications are only a guideline. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific individual is difficult to determine. Always consult your healthcare provider before starting or stopping any medication.
Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No interaction information available.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.