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Roux-en-y Gastric Bypass

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:

Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is a type of weight loss surgery. Staples are used to make a small stomach pouch that is separate from the rest of your stomach. The new stomach pouch is connected to the middle part of the small intestine When you eat, food bypasses the rest of the stomach and goes directly into the small intestine. The surgery makes your stomach smaller so that you feel full sooner and cannot eat as much during meals. Your body will not absorb as many calories from food because part of your stomach and intestines are bypassed.

DISCHARGE INSTRUCTIONS:

Call 911 for any of the following:

  • You feel lightheaded, short of breath, and have chest pain.
  • You cough up blood.

Seek care immediately if:

  • Your arm or leg feels warm, tender, and painful. It may look swollen and red.
  • Blood soaks through your bandages.
  • Your stitches or incisions come apart.
  • You cannot stop vomiting.

Contact your healthcare provider if:

  • You have a fever higher than 100°F (37.8°C).
  • You have pain or pressure in your abdomen or back, hiccups, and you feel restless.
  • You have redness, swelling, or pus coming from your incisions.
  • You have nausea and are vomiting.
  • You feel your heart beating faster than usual.
  • You have questions or concerns about your condition or care.

Medicines:

You may need any of the following:

  • Acetaminophen decreases pain and fever. It is available without a doctor's order. Ask how much to take and how often to take it. Follow directions. Read the labels of all other medicines you are using to see if they also contain acetaminophen, or ask your doctor or pharmacist. Acetaminophen can cause liver damage if not taken correctly. Do not use more than 4 grams (4,000 milligrams) total of acetaminophen in one day.
  • NSAIDs , such as ibuprofen, help decrease swelling, pain, and fever. NSAIDs can cause stomach bleeding or kidney problems in certain people. If you take blood thinner medicine, always ask your healthcare provider if NSAIDs are safe for you. Always read the medicine label and follow directions.
  • Prescription pain medicine may be given. Ask your healthcare provider how to take this medicine safely. Some prescription pain medicines contain acetaminophen. Do not take other medicines that contain acetaminophen without talking to your healthcare provider. Too much acetaminophen may cause liver damage. Prescription pain medicine may cause constipation. Ask your healthcare provider how to prevent or treat constipation.
  • Take your medicine as directed. Contact your healthcare provider if you think your medicine is not helping or if you have side effects. Tell him or her if you are allergic to any medicine. Keep a list of the medicines, vitamins, and herbs you take. Include the amounts, and when and why you take them. Bring the list or the pill bottles to follow-up visits. Carry your medicine list with you in case of an emergency.

Follow your nutrition plan:

Ask your dietitian or nutritionist any questions you have about what foods to eat and how much.

  • Eat slowly. Chew your food well before you swallow. Large bits of food may cause choking or may block your stomach.
  • Eat 3 small meals each day. Do not eat snacks between meals unless your healthcare provider says it is okay. Stop eating when you feel full, even if you have not eaten all of your meal.
  • Eat nutritious foods. Eat plenty of protein. You may need to protein drinks for the first week after surgery. Foods that contain protein include chicken, fish, eggs, and dairy products. Avoid candy, cookies, ice cream, and fried foods.
  • Drink liquids between meals. Wait at least 1 or 2 hours after a meal before you drink liquids. Do not drink liquids with meals. Drink water, diet drinks, or other drinks that have few or no calories. Do not drink carbonated liquids, such as soda.

Self-care:

  • Care for your wound as directed. When you allowed to bathe, carefully wash the wound with soap and water. Dry the area and put on new, clean bandages as directed. Change your bandages when they get wet or dirty.
  • Do activity or exercise as directed. Ask your healthcare provider about the best exercise plan for you.

Follow up with your healthcare provider as directed:

Write down your questions so you remember to ask them during your visits.

© 2017 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. All illustrations and images included in CareNotes® are the copyrighted property of A.D.A.M., Inc. or Truven Health Analytics.

The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

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