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Dolomite

Scientific Name(s): CaMg(CO3)2, Carbonate mineral
Common Name(s): Dolomite, Dolomitic limestone, Dolostone

Clinical Overview

Use

Dolomite is used as a supplementary source of magnesium and calcium; however, clinical studies are lacking to support these uses.

Dosing

No recent clinical studies support dosing recommendations for dolomite.

Contraindications

Contraindications have not been identified.

Pregnancy/Lactation

Avoid use. Information regarding safety and efficacy in pregnancy and lactation is lacking.

Interactions

None well documented.

Adverse Reactions

Dolomite dust may cause respiratory symptoms (eg, cough, phlegm, wheezing, productive cough, shortness of breath), especially among exposed workers.

Toxicology

Dolomite preparations contaminated with heavy metals may lead to toxicities with long-term use.

History

Dolomite was described as a rock by the French geologist Déodat Gratet de Dolomieu in 1791 and has been used as a calcium and magnesium supplement in animal feeds.Dolomite 2005 Gardeners commonly add dolomite to soils as a source of magnesium. Dolomite as a dietary supplement is available in several doseforms.

Chemistry

Dolomite is a form of limestone, rich in approximately equal parts of magnesium carbonate and calcium carbonate.Mizoguchi 2005 Found throughout the world, dolomitic limestone contains about 5 times as much magnesium and about 63% less calcium than common limestone. Dolomite also contains small amounts of chlorine, phosphorus, potassium, and more than 20 other trace elements.Dolomite 2005

Uses and Pharmacology

Bone

Animal data

Limited studies in rodents suggest that dolomite is a source of magnesium. In a 9-week study of ovariectomized rats, dolomite increased circulating serum magnesium and decreased serum calcium levels. However, dolomite did not improve bone histological indices such as bone mass.Mizoguchi 2005 In another rodent study, dolomite repaired bone damage more effectively than the negative control; however, dolomite was less effective than the positive control (bovine bone).Moreschi 2010

Dosing

Clinical information is lacking. No recent clinical studies support dosing recommendations for dolomite.

Pregnancy / Lactation

Avoid use. Information regarding safety and efficacy in pregnancy and lactation is lacking.

Interactions

None well documented.

Adverse Reactions

A rash diagnosed as pityriasis rubra pilaris has been reported.Iraji 2013 Dolomite dust may cause respiratory symptoms (eg, cough, phlegm, wheezing, productive cough, shortness of breath), especially among exposed workers.Neghab 2012

Toxicology

Dolomite preparations contaminated with heavy metals may lead to toxicities with long-term use. Dolomite supplements had higher rates of lead contamination than other calcium sources.Mattos 2006 Calcium supplements made from sedimentary rocks (including dolomite and chalk) have higher polonium levels than organic calcium compounds.Strumińska-Parulska 2015

Short-term toxicity studies in rats did not result in mortality with dolomite 2 g/kg. During organogenesis (day 6 to 17 post-conception), dolomite did not induce maternal or embryo-fetal toxicity in rats.Lagarto 2013

References

Iraji F, Siadat AH. Pityriasis rubra pilaris following exposure to dolomite. J Res Med Sci. 2013;18(7):621-622.24516497
Lagarto A, Bellma A, Couret M, et al. Prenatal effects of natural calcium supplement on Wistar rats during organogenesis period of pregnancy. Exp Toxicol Pathol. 2013;65(1-2):49-53.2170383610.1016/j.etp.2011.05.009
Mattos JC, Hahn M, Augusti PR, et al. Lead content of dietary calcium supplements available in Brazil. Food Addit Contam. 2006;23(2):133-139.16449055
Mizoguchi T, Nagasawa S, Takahashi N, Yagasaki H, Ito M. Dolomite supplementation improves bone metabolism through modulation of calcium-regulating hormone secretion in ovariectomized rats. J Bone Miner Metab. 2005;23(2):140-146.15750692
Moreschi E, Hernandes L, Dantas JA, da Silva MA, Casaroto AR, Bersani-Amado CA. Effect of dolomite on the repair of bone defects in rats: histological study. Histol Histopathol. 2010;25(12):1547-1556.20886435
Neghab M, Abedini R, Soltanzadeh A, Iloon Kashkooli A, Ghayoomi SM. Respiratory disorders associated with heavy inhalation exposure to dolomite dust. Iran Red Crescent Med J. 2012;14(9):549-557.23115717
Strumińska-Parulska DI. Determination of (210)Po in calcium supplements and the possible related dose assessment to the consumers. J Environ Radioact. 2015;150:121-125.2631877410.1016/j.jenvrad.2015.08.006
University of Arizona, Department of Geosciences. Dolomite. The RRUF Project Database website. http://rruff.info/doclib/hom/dolomite.pdf. Updated 2005. Accessed November 03, 2015.

Disclaimer

This information relates to an herbal, vitamin, mineral or other dietary supplement. This product has not been reviewed by the FDA to determine whether it is safe or effective and is not subject to the quality standards and safety information collection standards that are applicable to most prescription drugs. This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take this product. This information does not endorse this product as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this product. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to this product. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from your health care provider. You should talk with your health care provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this product.

This product may adversely interact with certain health and medical conditions, other prescription and over-the-counter drugs, foods, or other dietary supplements. This product may be unsafe when used before surgery or other medical procedures. It is important to fully inform your doctor about the herbal, vitamins, mineral or any other supplements you are taking before any kind of surgery or medical procedure. With the exception of certain products that are generally recognized as safe in normal quantities, including use of folic acid and prenatal vitamins during pregnancy, this product has not been sufficiently studied to determine whether it is safe to use during pregnancy or nursing or by persons younger than 2 years of age.

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

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