Skip to Content

The originating document has been archived. We cannot confirm the completeness, accuracy and currency of the content.

To SMA parents, advice for you >

procyclidine

Generic Name: procyclidine (proe SYE kli deen)
Brand Name: Kemadrin

What is procyclidine?

Procyclidine reduces the effects of certain chemicals in your body that may become unbalanced as a result of disease (such as Parkinson's disease), drug therapy, or other causes.

Procyclidine is used to treat the stiffness, tremors, spasms, and poor muscle control of Parkinson's disease. It is also used to treat and prevent these same muscular conditions when they are caused by drugs such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), and others.

Procyclidine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about procyclidine?

Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Procyclidine may cause dizziness or blurred vision. If you experience dizziness or blurred vision, avoid these activities.

Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking procyclidine.

Avoid becoming overheated. Procyclidine may cause decreased sweating. This could lead to heat stroke in hot weather or with vigorous exercise.

Who should not take procyclidine?

You cannot take procyclidine if you

  • have ever had an allergic reaction to it

  • have narrow-angle glaucoma,

  • have an obstruction in your bowel or a complication of bowel disease known as megacolon; or

  • have myasthenia gravis.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have

  • an enlarged prostate or difficulty urinating,

  • epilepsy or another seizure disorder,

  • heart disease or an irregular heartbeat,

  • depression or any other psychiatric illness, or

  • kidney or liver disease.

You may need a lower dose or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Procyclidine is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether procyclidine will harm an unborn baby. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant.

It is also not known whether procyclidine passes into breast milk. Do not take procyclidine without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take procyclidine?

Take procyclidine exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water.

Take procyclidine after meals to lessen stomach upset.

Procyclidine is usually taken three to four times a day. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Store procyclidine at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and only take your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention.

Symptoms of a procyclidine overdose include large pupils; warm, dry skin; flushed face; fever; dry mouth; fast or irregular heartbeat; anxiety; hallucinations; confusion; agitation; hyperactivity; loss of consciousness; and seizures.

What should I avoid while taking procyclidine?

Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Procyclidine may cause dizziness or blurred vision. If you experience dizziness or blurred vision, avoid these activities.

Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking procyclidine.

Avoid becoming overheated. Procyclidine may cause decreased sweating. This could lead to heat stroke in hot weather or with vigorous exercise. Try to keep as cool as possible and watch for signs of heat stroke such as decreased sweating, nausea, and dizziness.

Procyclidine side effects

If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking procyclidine and seek emergency medical attention:

  • an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives);

  • unusual fever;

  • fast or irregular heartbeat;

  • anxiety, hallucinations, confusion, hyperactivity, or loss of consciousness;

  • agitation, disorientation, or unusual behavior;

  • seizures;

  • eye pain; or

  • a rash.

Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take procyclidine and talk to your doctor if you experience

  • a dry mouth,

  • large pupils or blurred vision,

  • drowsiness,

  • difficulty urinating or constipation,

  • upset stomach, or

  • decreased sweating.

Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

What other drugs will affect procyclidine?

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all medicines you are taking especially any of the following:

  • a tricyclic antidepressant (used to treat depression, pain, or obsessive-compulsive disorders) such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep), doxepin (Sinequan), or clomipramine (Anafranil);

  • other commonly used tricyclic antidepressants, including amoxapine (Asendin), desipramine (Norpramin), imipramine (Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and protriptyline (Vivactil);

  • a phenothiazine (used to treat mania, schizophrenia, other psychiatric conditions, and nausea and vomiting) chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), perphenazine (Trilafon), mesoridazine (Serentil), thioridazine (Mellaril), promazine (Sparine), trifluoperazine (Stelazine), and others;

  • an antihistamine such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl, others), chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton, others), triprolidine (Actifed, others), brompheniramine (Dimetapp, others), clemastine (Tavist), and others, (antihistamines are often found in prescription and over-the-counter cold, allergy, and sleep medicines);

  • quinidine (Quinora, Quinaglute, Quinidex, Cardioquin);

  • amantadine (Symmetrel)

  • digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps); or

  • haloperidol (Haldol).

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with procyclidine. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.

Further information

  • Your pharmacist has more information about procyclidine written for health professionals that you may read.

What does my medication look like?

Procyclidine is available with a prescription under the brand name Kemadrin. Other brand or generic formulations may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you.

  • Kemadrin 5 mg--white, round, scored tablets

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Hide