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mafenide topical

Generic Name: mafenide topical (MAF en ide)
Brand Name: Sulfamylon

What is mafenide?

Mafenide is an antibiotic that fights bacteria in the body.

Mafenide topical (for the skin) is used to prevent infection in severe burn wounds.

Mafenide may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about mafenide?

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before receiving mafenide?

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to mafenide.

To make sure mafenide topical is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • kidney disease;

  • a genetic enzyme deficiency called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency;

  • asthma or sulfite allergy; or

  • if you are allergic to sulfa drugs.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether mafenide topical will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medicine.

It is not known whether mafenide topical passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while using this medicine.

How is mafenide used?

Your doctor will determine the correct amount and type of mafenide to use. You will receive this medication in a hospital or burn unit setting.

Mafenide cream is usually applied to the burn wound once or twice a day. The wound should be kept covered with this medicine at all times during treatment.

Mafenide powder is usually mixed together with a saline solution and applied over a gauze dressing using a syringe or irrigation tube. Mafenide is usually applied several times per day in order to keep the bandaging wet.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Because you will receive mafenide topical in a clinical setting, you are not likely to miss a dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Since this medicine is given by a healthcare professional in a medical setting, an overdose is unlikely to occur.

What should I avoid while being treated with mafenide?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Mafenide side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Tell your caregivers right away if you have:

  • pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, fever, confusion or weakness;

  • rapid breathing;

  • skin rash, bruising, severe tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness; or

  • severe skin irritation where the medicine is applied.

Common side effects may include:

  • rash, redness, blistering, or itching of treated skin;

  • pain or burning of treated skin; or

  • white or "pruned" appearance of the skin (caused by leaving wound dressings on for long periods of time).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

Mafenide topical dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Bacterial Infection:

Solution: Wet an 8-ply burn dressing with this solution and cover grafted area, keeping dressing wet by injecting solution into irrigation tubing every 4 hours as needed or by moistening dressing every 6 to 8 hours as needed

Comments:
-Discontinue treatment if allergic manifestations occur.
-Wound dressings may be left undisturbed, except for irrigations, for up to 5 days; additional soaks may be initiated until graft take is complete.
-Maceration of skin may result from wet dressings applied for intervals as short as 24 hours.
-Treatment should continue until autograft vascularization occurs and healing is progressing (usually in about 5 days); safety and efficacy have not been established for longer than 5 days for an individual grafting procedure.

Use: As adjunctive therapy to control bacterial infections when used under moist dressings over meshed autografts on excised burn wounds

Cream: Apply using a sterile glove to cleaned and debrided burn wounds once or twice a day, at a thickness of 1/16 inch; thicker application not recommended

Comments:
-The cream should be reapplied whenever it is removed (e.g., patient activity) to keep burns covered at all times.
-Dressings are not usually necessary, however, if the patient requires them, a thin layer of dressings may be used.
-Treatment should continue until healing is progressing well or until burn site is ready for grafting.

Use: As adjunctive therapy for the treatment of second- and third- degree burns

Usual Adult Dose for Burns - External:

Solution: Wet an 8-ply burn dressing with this solution and cover grafted area, keeping dressing wet by injecting solution into irrigation tubing every 4 hours as needed or by moistening dressing every 6 to 8 hours as needed

Comments:
-Discontinue treatment if allergic manifestations occur.
-Wound dressings may be left undisturbed, except for irrigations, for up to 5 days; additional soaks may be initiated until graft take is complete.
-Maceration of skin may result from wet dressings applied for intervals as short as 24 hours.
-Treatment should continue until autograft vascularization occurs and healing is progressing (usually in about 5 days); safety and efficacy have not been established for longer than 5 days for an individual grafting procedure.

Use: As adjunctive therapy to control bacterial infections when used under moist dressings over meshed autografts on excised burn wounds

Cream: Apply using a sterile glove to cleaned and debrided burn wounds once or twice a day, at a thickness of 1/16 inch; thicker application not recommended

Comments:
-The cream should be reapplied whenever it is removed (e.g., patient activity) to keep burns covered at all times.
-Dressings are not usually necessary, however, if the patient requires them, a thin layer of dressings may be used.
-Treatment should continue until healing is progressing well or until burn site is ready for grafting.

Use: As adjunctive therapy for the treatment of second- and third- degree burns

Usual Pediatric Dose for Bacterial Infection:

Solution:
3 months or older: Wet an 8-ply burn dressing with this solution and cover grafted area, keeping dressing wet by injecting solution into irrigation tubing every 4 hours as needed or by moistening dressing every 6 to 8 hours as needed

Comments:
-Discontinue treatment if allergic manifestations occur.
-Wound dressings may be left undisturbed, except for irrigations, for up to 5 days; additional soaks may be initiated until graft take is complete.
-Maceration of skin may result from wet dressings applied for intervals as short as 24 hours.
-Treatment should continue until autograft vascularization occurs and healing is progressing (usually in about 5 days); safety and efficacy have not been established for longer than 5 days for an individual grafting procedure.

Use: As adjunctive therapy to control bacterial infections when used under moist dressings over meshed autografts on excised burn wounds

Cream: Apply using a sterile glove to cleaned and debrided burn wounds once or twice a day, at a thickness of 1/16 inch; thicker application not recommended

Comments:
-The cream should be reapplied whenever it is removed (e.g., patient activity) to keep burns covered at all times.
-Dressings are not usually necessary, however, if the patient requires them, a thin layer of dressings may be used.
-Treatment should continue until healing is progressing well or until burn site is ready for grafting.

Use: As adjunctive therapy for the treatment of second- and third- degree burns

Usual Pediatric Dose for Burns - External:

Solution:
3 months or older: Wet an 8-ply burn dressing with this solution and cover grafted area, keeping dressing wet by injecting solution into irrigation tubing every 4 hours as needed or by moistening dressing every 6 to 8 hours as needed

Comments:
-Discontinue treatment if allergic manifestations occur.
-Wound dressings may be left undisturbed, except for irrigations, for up to 5 days; additional soaks may be initiated until graft take is complete.
-Maceration of skin may result from wet dressings applied for intervals as short as 24 hours.
-Treatment should continue until autograft vascularization occurs and healing is progressing (usually in about 5 days); safety and efficacy have not been established for longer than 5 days for an individual grafting procedure.

Use: As adjunctive therapy to control bacterial infections when used under moist dressings over meshed autografts on excised burn wounds

Cream: Apply using a sterile glove to cleaned and debrided burn wounds once or twice a day, at a thickness of 1/16 inch; thicker application not recommended

Comments:
-The cream should be reapplied whenever it is removed (e.g., patient activity) to keep burns covered at all times.
-Dressings are not usually necessary, however, if the patient requires them, a thin layer of dressings may be used.
-Treatment should continue until healing is progressing well or until burn site is ready for grafting.

Use: As adjunctive therapy for the treatment of second- and third- degree burns

What other drugs will affect mafenide?

It is not likely that other drugs you take orally or inject will have an effect on topically applied mafenide. But many drugs can interact with each other. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about mafenide topical.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 2.02.

Last reviewed: September 17, 2014
Date modified: January 10, 2017

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