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Isopto Carbachol

Generic Name: carbachol ophthalmic (KAR ba kall)
Brand Name: Carbachol Ophthalmic, Isopto Carbachol, Miostat

What is carbachol ophthalmic?

Carbachol lowers pressure in the eye by increasing the amount of fluid that drains from the eye.

Carbachol ophthalmic (for the eye) is used to reduce pressure inside the eye after cataract surgery.

Carbachol ophthalmic may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about carbachol ophthalmic?

Before you are treated with carbachol ophthalmic, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions or allergies, and all the medicines you are using. Also make sure your doctor knows if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. In some cases, you may not be able to use carbachol ophthalmic, or you may need a dose adjustment or special precautions.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving carbachol ophthalmic?

You should not be treated with carbachol ophthalmic if you are allergic to it.

To make sure carbachol ophthalmic is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • swelling of your iris (the colored part of your eye);

  • a detached retina;

  • heart failure;

  • asthma;

  • a stomach ulcer;

  • an overactive thyroid;

  • urination problems;

  • Parkinson's disease; or

  • an allergy to latex.

It is not known whether carbachol ophthalmic will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant.

It is not known whether carbachol ophthalmic passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I use carbachol ophthalmic?

Carbachol ophthalmic is given as an injection into your eye. Your doctor will use a medicine to numb your eye before giving you the injection. You will receive this injection in your doctor's office or other clinic setting.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since carbachol ophthalmic is given by a healthcare professional during surgery, it does not have a daily dosing schedule.

What happens if I overdose?

Since this medicine is given by a healthcare professional in a medical setting, an overdose is unlikely to occur.

What should I avoid after receiving carbachol ophthalmic?

This medicine may cause blurred vision and may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly.

Carbachol ophthalmic side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • new or sudden vision problems;

  • seeing "floaters" in your vision; or

  • urination problems.

Common side effects may include:

  • blurred vision;

  • flushing (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling);

  • stomach pain or upset;

  • headache; or

  • a tight feeling in your bladder.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

What other drugs will affect carbachol ophthalmic?

It is not likely that other drugs you take orally or inject will have an effect on carbachol used in the eyes. But many drugs can interact with each other. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all medicines you use, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your doctor can provide more information about carbachol ophthalmic.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 7.01. Revision Date: 2016-03-02, 2:15:38 PM.

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